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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/08/18 in all areas

  1. Flat earth is the term used to identify a period when UK hifi was dominated by the linn naim bollocks speweing alliance. There was even a mag devoted to it, the flat response I think it was called. You basically bought a sondek, best linn arm and cart you could, a naim amp, and any money left on speakers. Any other UK maker stuff was second rate, and Jap was crap. The UK market missed out on some fantastic gear because of it.
    4 points
  2. As it goes I was not replying to you, so its hardly surprising you said nothing of the sort Is it. I must have missed the bit where they made you a mod, and you got to choose what stays , and what goes on the forum. sorry beaten to it on both counts
    4 points
  3. I was lucky to see the late, and very great Gary Moore a couple of times. Probably the best guitar player I have ever seen...
    3 points
  4. [1987] Level 42 ‎– Running In The Family [LP]
    3 points
  5. and back to Tidal James Taylor - Hourglass finally getting released on vinyl in October
    3 points
  6. Aye, like ye applies to ye own handful of members whilst directing and encouraging personal attacks on people from other forums.
    3 points
  7. That's right. A blues and blues rock thread. Let's go.
    2 points
  8. Good stuff also loved the Zeppelin clip. In through the out door possibly the most underrated album of all time. Bonham and Jones incredible on it. Agree Blackening best metal album this century (along with Christ Illusion Slayer). I’m more into older thrash and heavier stuff like Carcass, Death, Sepultura. Let’s keep it going keep the metal faith alive (C Shuldiner, Death)!
    2 points
  9. I love the Muddy Waters version on the Folk Singer too.
    2 points
  10. [1978] Kate Bush ‎– The Kick Inside [flac]
    2 points
  11. 2 points
  12. [1982] Dire Straits - Love Over Gold [2010 Pallas remastered/reissued 180g LP]
    2 points
  13. That is what I have done in the past also, Colin and if it makes the sound radiated by cabinet vibrations inaudible below the sound from the drive units, then the damping is adequate. More useful information here if anyone fancies a long read in-depth read: http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/rd/pubs/reports/1977-03.pdf
    2 points
  14. Grab yourself a Roksan Kandy K3 and you will have a very good MOSFET amp with 8 trannies on the heat sink and a beefy torroid to keep them fed. From the Far East a Yamaha A-S3000 or A-S2100 will be a good choice for a FET.
    2 points
  15. this one for me its a classic slayer album
    2 points
  16. [1978] Jeff Wayne ‎– Jeff Wayne's Musical Version Of The War Of The Worlds [2017 remastered/reissued 2 x 180g LP's]
    2 points
  17. The additional issue is of course that what some consider 'evidence', others do not. Hearsay is not admissible in courts of law, but here, it is considered as gospel, if you will pardon the irony. What we are discussing here is 'belief', so 'evidence' is not only inadmissible, but is frankly unimportant. Some believe in a god, some - including me - do not. That does not make any of us 'right'. And frankly, it does not matter either. Some of our closest friends are atheists, some are very strict Hindus, some are Jewish and we even have a couple of Christians among them. Their beliefs do not matter to me, their observance of their faith does not either (except I hate catering for vegetarians ). What does matter is that they are people we can call on if we need help. And they can equally call on us.
    2 points
  18. Pink floyd -. Atom heart mother original vinyl , albeit a bit crackly.
    2 points
  19. Always loved a good live album and this is the one that got me into Slayer. Then listened to Seasons in the Abyss non-stop for a couple of months.
    2 points
  20. Or alternatively, in the 60s the UK hifi market was old and stale and measurements were king. If you saw a review then it was 85% discussion on what it looks like and how it measured and then a conclusion with the very brave adding a sentence or two on how it sounded. Then a big change occurred. A new breed of reviewer and companies came along. The magazine were subjectively focused, well written and they did not read like a manual. They concentrated on new emerging companies. These products were different and challenged the status quo. Previously speakers were king and of course you could have pages and pages of measurements on speakers. The new guys listened. The new companies reversed the status quo, turntables made the sound and therefore they were the most important component, source first. Turntables dictated the sound of the system. Then amps and then speakers. The new companies were mainly Linn and Naim whose components complemented each other. Linn were very sharp business guys led by a characterful leader. This group listened to loud aggresive music not bland jazz and classical. A similar revolution was going on in the BBC with groups turning up with guitars and drums and playing LOUD. Wonderful just what the industry needed and it happened when younger guys were starting to get a lot of new money. Because of the subjective approach they became known as 'flat earthers' because they did not follow the measurements ethos. A derogatory term to insinuate they were dumb and believed in the flat earth. It soon became a badge of honour. The new gang. As for all trends it went too far and everything else was treated with disdain. Reviewers reviewing turntables from rival companies without taking them out of their boxes. If you wanted to sell Naim you could not sell any other amp, apart from Exposure, which was not as good. Despite that the Linn/Naim systems were exciting, they played modern music and made it sound great. The older systems were for contemplating your navel with but the newer system made you want to dance. A favourite album was New Boots and Panties by Ian Dury and the Blockheads. The older guys favourite was 35 different stereo effects involving steam engines and garage doors slamming... And of course it ran out of steam and other newer companies came along with valves and efficient speakers and such like. They had control of most of the hifi magazines including Hifi Answers, Popular Hifi, Flat Response, Hifi Choice etc.......Gramaphone and Hifi News stuck to the old ways but even they changed.
    2 points
  21. "Writing about music is like dancing about architecture" - I don't know who said it, but they had a point....and for me, judging a system is about the music and my enjoyment of it. Putting this on paper in a way that other people can relate to, is more difficult. What I have found over 40+ years in this wonderful hobby, is that (for me), chasing Neutrality, or Fidelity to what the Mastering engineer heard, is a waste of time. Measurements are useful, but not the final deal maker. I look for hard to define characteristics, that are totally subjective and not measurable, like Realism, Euphony, Believeability, Authenticity, Emotional Connection, Immediacy, Authority, Excitement and Refinement. Like many others, I use live acoustic/orchestral music as the benchmark - especially Piano, Violin, Trumpet, Cymbals/ Snare Drum, Soprano and Tenor. Give me Natural over Neutral, any day of the week...not least, as I find Natural easier to figure out. It greatly helps that I know what I like and I now have a much better idea of how to achieve it, but it has taken many years. There are (ime) few shortcuts to this. You simply have to get out there and listen to as many brands as possible....and get your head round Vinyl, Digital, Solid State, Valves, Hybrids, every Class of Amp and as many speaker designs as possible (Sealed/Reflex/TL etc). In my time at WHF, almost everybody who took the bother to try Valves/Hybrid, jumped in that direction....and the biggest complaint was "My system is too bright and tiring to listen to". I find that it helps to find which reviewers have taste closest to yours (and learn to read between the lines, as Mags tend not to be too critical, as they are part of the HiFi industry). I also have people on forums whose ears and taste I have come to trust. I recently had a difficult speaker decision, which involved a lot of head scratching, being totally honest with myself and truly examining what was most important to me. This post is now long enough....and if you can bear with me for a little longer, I will write a bit more about my decision regarding some Kef Ref 3 and Harbeth 40.2s on another post. Thank you to those who made it this far.
    2 points
  22. Seems its been too long since this thread was posted on... so recently back from a full service by Angus/Phonomac is my SP10 MK.2 which has been dropped into a Design & Sound plinth, with a Puresound Tenuto platter mat and Micro Seiki microsorber feet. The tonearm (with thanks to Hugo @ Ammonite Acoustics) is a Jelco TK850S with an Timestep T-01HS ebony headshell and a Hana SL cartridge. I also have a custom made ebony armboard (supplied by Steve @ Magna Audio) but I'm waiting to see if the Jelco does the business before having it drilled... It sounds fab, even though the Hana SL only has around 14 hours on it and is barely run in
    2 points
  23. Rightfully this place is a cat forum. The more of us the better. Steering away from being a cat forum is one of the reasons why the Wigwam dwindled in recent times. I did warn about that. Anyway, we're here now so it can only go upwards.
    2 points
  24. Gran bought me this for me 17th: Best JP LP, but Painkiller, above, is a good one too.
    2 points
  25. Well, another refugee from WHF who just jumped ship. Glad to see some familiar names here already And did I say my new home looks cool
    2 points
  26. George is being polite as always, but some people don't understand that. So I'm not going to be polite. Play nicely, or this thread is going in the bin. Nobody except admin and the moderators decide what is allowed here. We all have other things to do apart from dealing with children on a day out. Think before you post.
    2 points
  27. Good to see that us metalheads have some representation on the Wam! A couple from yester year And one more recent one...
    2 points
  28. Reading the spec at the link you gave, it sounds like 3 separate amplifiers, fed via a 3-way active crossover. So definitely an active speaker.
    2 points
  29. If you genuinely can't tell them apart, and you MUST get rid of one.... Keep the Rotel - purely on the basis of it being a better looking unit. You've already stated the sound is not a consideration. With all that said, I do like the idea of selling both and buying something better.
    2 points
  30. 2 points
  31. My bro has purchased the 1.0 Eco Boost. It's a fabulous drive and very quick for such a tiny engine. I would suggest it isn't too far off my 2.0 JTS Alfa for 0-60 times. It's dirt cheap to run - it's win, win... for owners. That's the influence of F1 technology seeping down into everyday cars.
    2 points
  32. Its frustrating. The bee keeping shops and Amazon don't seem to have any bee keeping hats wth a picnic flap. If I can't get a food flap I'd be happy with a rubber surrounded port for a drinking straw. I suppose I could always sneak a bun up the ring base and get my hand out quickly before the wasps notice. But yeah, for my beer I want a straw port to enable continued sipping, with peace of mind. Any secret bee keepers able to help with my picnic needs ?
    2 points
  33. A good british thrash band Xenteix which at the time they were just as big as Metallica and the best album i like is Kin and i found out that have just got back together again but with a different lead singer which is a shame but the band are based in yorkshire and it seems a lot of the good bands come from up north .
    2 points
  34. Thanks vlad …….nice comment O G ……. Bryce Janey …. another one of my faves.
    1 point
  35. Yes, he is good, probably exceptional as a guitar player, but my pick (Without You) is one of those tunes that really touches my soul.
    1 point
  36. I was going to say the Roksan k3. I have one. It's great
    1 point
  37. 1 point
  38. wow , thanks for that . yes richard , 4 months ago i would have probably bought them but got some new tannoy eaton i bought off the same dealer !! they are quite small and fit the room well and i might have a job convincing my good lady but they are very tempting . verity make some beautiful speakers certainly a good uplift from my verity rienzi
    1 point
  39. A new one for me. Don’t know how I missed this. Now added to the playlist. Thanks.
    1 point
  40. here is a great band from the 1990s ugly kid joe there are some great songs on this album
    1 point
  41. Excellent post and mirrors much of my experience, expect like Paul, I remain unsure about the speaker that shall not be named. For me, it's piano. Always. Any system that can render a piano decently can almost always do everything else well. Any system that can't is a no go for me.
    1 point
  42. If I was to upgrade my shortlist would be as follows, in no particular order: Hegel; Lavardin; Accuphase; Luxman
    1 point
  43. Skid row a great band in there day with a singer with such a powerful range and this album shows that And then he went on to do a solo career
    1 point
  44. The two Blaze Maiden albums received something of a bad press, but they are not bad. The last two Dickinson albums before he left did not compare with the earlier ones. Metal went through a hard time in the 90s when Grunge took over and I think this contributed a lot to the decisions of Dickinson and Halford to quit their bands. Glad to see an interest in Metal on WAM now.
    1 point
  45. hi folks, i came from whathifi. i bought my first hifi in may of 2016. i've started with a pioneer a30 + elac fs 147 + qed xt40. then i bought van damme 2*4 hifi, cambridge cxa80, polk audio tsx 220b, primare i22, elac bs 403, elac fs 249.3, pro-ject dac box s2. next step would be a primare i32 full analogue version and a vertere pulse xmini speaker cable. great to see other whathifi members and hope this community will be just as good.
    1 point
  46. Blaze seen him live used to sing for Iron Maiden on 2 albums then went solo but had a band before joining iron Maiden but can't remember what the band was called but a great singer and worth checking out
    1 point
  47. grand magus which i find by mistake they are also a bit like Manowar but a little harder this is a great album which has some thrash to there songs with good riffs . megadeth a great thrash band i have seen this band live on the countdown to extinction tour which i feel was there best album to date .
    1 point
  48. The way I see it, people can practice audiophilia for a multitude of reasons: some like vintage equipment, others crave for the latest gear, some are tweakers and DIY'ers while others are brand addicts, some like rock, some electronic, others jazz or classical, some like analog others digital, tubes or transistors, some are tech savvy and more rational while a few more will go at it in a mostly subjective manner, some are well-off while many suffer from budget constraints...audiophiles are hybrid beings in the way they build their system and the vast majority will probably shift their objectives back and forth throughout their lives. The construction of an audio (or recorded music playback) system is a personal journey, guided by our own objectives and our tastes (both musical and sonic). My path has combined the possible experimentation with some research on technical documentation and reading accounts of individual experiences. The development of my system has been growing towards an approach that is driven by two major concepts: "transparency" (an absolute "respect" for signal integrityof the recorded signal) and "naturalness". I find that to achieve musical expressiveness one must first get as much information as possible from the support. The music genre which I appreciate the most is "classical", with a special emphasis on symphonic music of the Romantic period: piano (solo or in concert), cello (accompanied by piano or the orchestra) and also some music with vocal content (opera, songs and cantatas). From an audiophile point of view, the advantage of using this type of acoustic music (played in spaces with natural reverberation) is that it can be used as a sonic reference in the evaluation of equipment, systems and recordings; it usually benefits from careful recording and mastering, unlike most the studio recordings that only "exist" as they exit the mixer or in the amplified concerts where the sound heard by the audience is a "reproduction" of what was captured by the microphones or the table, amplified and transduced by PA systems that do not have fidelity as their main objective. Moreover, the sonic and musical complexity, the wide frequency band, the wide dynamic range and the variety of sounds / sound sources of "classical" music provide a particularly demanding challenge both in its recording and subsequent reproduction in a domestic environment. Good recordings also capture the ambience or the venue, the acoustic cues which will transport you to the original event and which may prove challenging to reproduce. Having "natural/realistic" reproduction of "classical" music as a goal, I expect my system to reproduce recordings with the highest possible fidelity and to achieve this it is necessary to choose equipment topologies that offer the greatest potential and to seek the maximum technical excellence in each of them (within my budget, of course). Ideally this would mean a frequency response covering the whole range of human hearing (20-20,000Hz), a dynamic range limited only by the recording and the listening room background noise, with negligible amounts of the various distortions, in such a way as to allow "clarity" and transient response needed to produce sounds as "naturally" as possible. . I hate performing AB comparisons; tedious is probably the best way to describe them. I use measured performance - a comprehensive set of measurements, not manufacturers specs sheets - for shortlisting, from magazines and manufacturers. Shows are nice to get a vague idea of what speakers sound like but these not always partnered with adequate amplification, the room acoustics is usually quite bad and you must wait to seat in the sweet-spot. There's no way one can get any meaningless impression about the sound of a source. Music is often too loud and hardly ever good for assessing performance and they're never too keen on playing your music (I always take a couple of tracks which are suited to the task). Bake-offs are a good alternative, you can play your music, adjust the volume and no need to fight for the hot-seat. A/B and blind A/B comparisons are only capable of revealing gross differences; level-matching is paramount, make sure your dealer isn't fiddling with the volume (use an app). I evaluate aspects of sound through listening just as I would through measurements: things like tonal balance, noise-floor, various types of distortion. Different recordings expose shortcomings in different aspects of performance. Long term listening is more revealing in the long run. . Some (subjective) characteristics that in my opinion define "transparency" and therefore a "good" sound: • tonal balance ("flat" frequency response) - no part of the spectrum stands out from the others • resolution at low listeing levels (absence of noise and "distortions") - when the volume is lowered the "detail" remains relatively stable (despite the inevitable but slight change in tone) • "smooth" or "comfortable" sound (absence of noise and "distortions") - it is possible to chat without difficulty even with the system playing at relatively high sound pressure levels • "loose" dynamics • absence of "hardness" or "grain"
    1 point
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