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Fermented bean curd

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avole

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Bought a jar and am wondering what to do with it - was to be used as a base for vegetarian red curry paste, but it looks, well, a bit cheesy to me, and certainly no substitute for shrimp paste.

 

rabski

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Bought a jar and am wondering what to do with it - was to be used as a base for vegetarian red curry paste, but it looks, well, a bit cheesy to me, and certainly no substitute for shrimp paste.
I would personally take it to the end of the garden then blow it up with about a kilo of TNT. That actually may not be enough. Fermented bean curd is the sort of shit that is near impossible to destroy. I believe Dr Who faced it in one episode and actually gave up.

Why the fuck anyone would ferment bean curd remains one of the world's great unanswered questions. It's crap to start with, and fermented, it simply turns into indestructible stinking crap.

Wrap it up and send it somewhere, a long, long way away.

 
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Pierre The Bear

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It has uses.

Smear it on the car door handles of bad parkers, that's a good one. Whatever you do don't eat any.

 

mikehit

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I like bean curd but, boy that stuff tastes strong: I bought a jar once and binned it after tasting one (small) mouthful. There are many different types (the one I tried was reed Szichuan fermented tofu), but after that one tasting I won't try anymore.

I would say that if you like strong (and I mean) strong blue cheeses (I don't) then give it a go. But the chinese tend to use it as a condiment to things like congee (rice porridge) rather than eating it as you would normal tofu.

 

Hornucopia

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Bean curd is well known as a Calming agent.

Which is why we can tell Richard has never eaten any?

I would personally take it to the end of the garden then blow it up with about a kilo of TNT. That actually may not be enough. Fermented bean curd is the sort of shit that is near impossible to destroy. I believe Dr Who faced it in one episode and actually gave up.Why the fuck anyone would ferment bean curd remains one of the world's great unanswered questions. It's crap to start with, and fermented, it simply turns into indestructible stinking crap.

Wrap it up and send it somewhere, a long, long way away.
 

Jezzer

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I like bean curd but, boy that stuff tastes strong: I bought a jar once and binned it after tasting one (small) mouthful. There are many different types (the one I tried was reed Szichuan fermented tofu), but after that one tasting I won't try anymore. I would say that if you like strong (and I mean) strong blue cheeses (I don't) then give it a go. But the chinese tend to use it as a condiment to things like congee (rice porridge) rather than eating it as you would normal tofu.
:goodone:

For me, it's one to avoid - in the same way as I would avoid 'century eggs'.

 

JBCobra

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My policy is to expel fermented materials:whistle:, not eat them and add more fuel to the fire! :shock: :nerves:

 
A

avole

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I like bean curd but, boy that stuff tastes strong: I bought a jar once and binned it after tasting one (small) mouthful. There are many different types (the one I tried was reed Szichuan fermented tofu), but after that one tasting I won't try anymore. I would say that if you like strong (and I mean) strong blue cheeses (I don't) then give it a go. But the chinese tend to use it as a condiment to things like congee (rice porridge) rather than eating it as you would normal tofu.
Cheers for the info.Am going ahead with curry plans on the weekend - the problem is that Thai and Cambodian curries use both shrimp paste and fish sauce, and while soy sauce is an adequate substitute for fish sauce, I've found nothing that gives the extra depth in taste like shrimp paste does.

Bought the szechuan red fermented bean curd by the way, the others all looked a bit grey.

P.S Don't mind century eggs once every decade or so!

 

mikehit

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I agree about shrimp paste vs fish sauce vs soy sauce - you cannot substitute one for the other. I remember first going into a restaurant in Vietnam 20 years ago and being smacked in the face with this strong smell of fish sauce - every place setting had a small dish of fish sauce on the side as a condiment/dip so you can imagine that in the heat it became a pervading smell. At first it was overpowering but I soon got used to it and now love the taste and smell. I thought it would be that way with fermented bean curd, but alas, no.

I do like Szechuan cooking for its strong, bold flavours but the bean curd is a step too far for me.

FWIW, I like cooking noodle dishes and fried rice the Thai way: relatively mild but have a pot of fish sauce and a pot of rice vinegar each stacked with finely sliced fresh bird's eye chillies. Then spoon them on to make the dish as salty/sour/hot as you want.

 

TheMinimalCriminal

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I agree about shrimp paste vs fish sauce vs soy sauce - you cannot substitute one for the other. I remember first going into a restaurant in Vietnam 20 years ago and being smacked in the face with this strong smell of fish sauce - every place setting had a small dish of fish sauce on the side as a condiment/dip so you can imagine that in the heat it became a pervading smell. At first it was overpowering but I soon got used to it and now love the taste and smell. I thought it would be that way with fermented bean curd, but alas, no. I do like Szechuan cooking for its strong, bold flavours but the bean curd is a step too far for me.

FWIW, I like cooking noodle dishes and fried rice the Thai way: relatively mild but have a pot of fish sauce and a pot of rice vinegar each stacked with finely sliced fresh bird's eye chillies. Then spoon them on to make the dish as salty/sour/hot as you want.
If no fish sauce, try sprinkling crushed up Smiths' Scampi crisps over the top instead.

 
A

avole

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...FWIW, I like cooking noodle dishes and fried rice the Thai way: relatively mild but have a pot of fish sauce and a pot of rice vinegar each stacked with finely sliced fresh bird's eye chillies. Then spoon them on to make the dish as salty/sour/hot as you want.
That's how I do it - substitute soy sauce these days, and leave out for an hour or two so the chilli taste penetrates the sauce. Adds a bit of zing to the dishes in Thai restaurants, which, particularly here in France, tend to be watered down so as not to offend the local palate.
 

Joelsim

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Vegetarians coming to dinner? Simply serve them a nice bit of steak or veal. Since they`re always going on about how tofu, Quorn, meat substitute etc `tastes exactly like the real thing`, they won`t know any difference.

On a serious note though, I am having my first ever Vegan Xmas dinner this year at some friends' house. Funnily enough I'm quite looking forward to seeing what they do.

 

Hornucopia

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Tastes like the real thing, only if you have no taste buds!

Can never understand why you'd want, as a vegetarian, a Meat SUBSTITUTE!

This coming from me who ran a Veg Cafe for 28 years!

Nearly as bad as Alcohol-free wine/Beer, or de-caf coffee?

Vegan food CAN be fine, if done with imagination.

 

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