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'Linn' for £77

enjoy_the_music

Wammer
Wammer
Jul 20, 2006
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Brittany , France
AKA
Farmer Rich
Yeah pretty good buy that...bit of oil and check the springs ...nice
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M

murray johnson

Guest
I'm sure any subsequent Linn 'upgrades' could be applied to it although I'd leave it alone.

 

JonR

Wammer
Wammer
Sep 3, 2005
1,475
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Herts
AKA
Unknown
Wow - if you're looking for evidence of where the LP12 came from, you can't get much clearer than that really, can you!

 
M

murray johnson

Guest
JonR wrote:

Wow - if you're looking for evidence of where the LP12 came from, you can't get much clearer than that really, can you!
From Analog Addicts

"...The truth is, the two designs share a number of things in common. They are both three point sprung suspensions as both are based on the original AR white paper for transcription turntables. They both use a wood plinth which looks similar, a two-piece platter, and identical dust covers (except for the logo--LP12 Vs Ariston).

There used to be another saying that Hamish Robertson who designed the Ariston RD11 was by nature a drinking man and not an entrepreneur. There came into his life a certain Ivor Tiefenbrun who suggested that his fathers' firm, from memory I think was called Castle Engineering, could machine parts for the Ariston turntable. Hamish accepted the offer and soon the product rolled of Ivor's production line. Imagine the shock some little time later when Ivor appeared at a northern Hi-Fi show with what seemed to be a carbon copy of the RD11 under his arm but now bearing the name Linn LP12.

From the above, it would appear that at least the Ariston and the LP12 were designed by the same engineer, to whit, Hamish Robertson..!!

Hamish, daunted by this, took to his bottle and some time later was found dead at home after a particularly heavy drinking bout. Rumour has it that he had committed suicide but I seem to remember the autopsy showed that he had asphyxiated by inhaling his own vomit....."

I don't know how much of that is true but the Ariston did come out in 1971 & the LP12 1972. Castle Engineering did used to make the parts for Ariston. Where the supposed 'tuneplaying' capability suddenly came from is anyone's guess...
wink.png


 

The Strat

Wammer
Wammer
Aug 17, 2005
14,024
130
123
Buckingham, UK
AKA
Lindsay
HiFi Trade?
  1. No
murray johnson wrote:

JonR wrote:
Wow - if you're looking for evidence of where the LP12 came from, you can't get much clearer than that really, can you!
From Analog Addicts

"...The truth is, the two designs share a number of things in common. They are both three point sprung suspensions as both are based on the original AR white paper for transcription turntables. They both use a wood plinth which looks similar, a two-piece platter, and identical dust covers (except for the logo--LP12 Vs Ariston).

There used to be another saying that Hamish Robertson who designed the Ariston RD11 was by nature a drinking man and not an entrepreneur. There came into his life a certain Ivor Tiefenbrun who suggested that his fathers' firm, from memory I think was called Castle Engineering, could machine parts for the Ariston turntable. Hamish accepted the offer and soon the product rolled of Ivor's production line. Imagine the shock some little time later when Ivor appeared at a northern Hi-Fi show with what seemed to be a carbon copy of the RD11 under his arm but now bearing the name Linn LP12.

From the above, it would appear that at least the Ariston and the LP12 were designed by the same engineer, to whit, Hamish Robertson..!!

Hamish, daunted by this, took to his bottle and some time later was found dead at home after a particularly heavy drinking bout. Rumour has it that he had committed suicide but I seem to remember the autopsy showed that he had asphyxiated by inhaling his own vomit....."

I don't know how much of that is true but the Ariston did come out in 1971 & the LP12 1972. Castle Engineering did used to make the parts for Ariston. Where the supposed 'tuneplaying' capability suddenly came from is anyone's guess...
wink.png
I have it on pretty good authority that all of this is true. When I bought my Ariston RD 80 in 1985 with a LVX/K9 in comparison with a LP12 similarly equipped much similarity in sound.

 

enjoy_the_music

Wammer
Wammer
Jul 20, 2006
1,913
1
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Brittany , France
AKA
Farmer Rich
Rock and Roll!

Off to a dinner tonight with friends from spain, germany, peru and france. Hopefully i won't end up like i did here two weeks ago on a trip to luxembourg...flatline pissed at 4am in the morning in a very swanky bar...fell headfirst into a leather sofa, my face becoming wedged inbetween the seats and my feet in the air...ROCK.

''Hamish, daunted by this, took to his bottle and some time later was found dead at home after a particularly heavy drinking bout. Rumour has it that he had committed suicide but I seem to remember the autopsy showed that he had asphyxiated by inhaling his own vomit....."

 
M

murray johnson

Guest
LOL there's a definite mixture of amusement, annoyance and incomprehension in those eyes! You really weren't there were you?!!

 

Davewhityetagain

Wammer
Wammer
Jul 24, 2005
11,690
4
0
, ,

enjoy_the_music

Wammer
Wammer
Jul 20, 2006
1,913
1
0
Brittany , France
AKA
Farmer Rich
Murray we definitely need to drink many beers one night.

Indeed yes i was quite drunk and at that moment awoken...like the Kraken.

Amazing night it was and indeed i took the train to Paris the day after to continue my good preaching...
biggrin.png


murray johnson wrote:

LOL there's a definite mixture of amusement, annoyance and incomprehension in those eyes! You really weren't there were you?!!
 

Davewhityetagain

Wammer
Wammer
Jul 24, 2005
11,690
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0
, ,
notaclue wrote:

This guy has a bit to say too

http://www.n.mackie.btinternet.co.uk/linn/tlp12faq.html#history

There used to be a saying among the Scottish Hi-Fi community that the engineers coming out of university turned left to go to Heybrook and right to go to Linn.

Despite the apocryphal nature of this anecdote, the truth is, the two designs share a number of things in common. They are both three point sprung suspensions as both are based on the original AR white paper for transcription turntables. They both use a wood plinth which looks similar, a two-piece platter, and identical dust covers (except for the logo--LP12 Vs TT2).

The differences are in the details. The Heybrook TT2 has a massive sub-chassis compared to the Linn. It is very thick aluminium compared to the thin steel Linn use. The TT2 plinth is constructed of 1" thick MDF with a wood veneer, the LP12 of solid wood, usually English ash. In addition, most of the cavities inside the chassis of the TT2 are filled with shaped wood blocks, in the Linn they are not.

The springs in the TT2 are stiffer and can be adjusted from the top plate using a 5mm Allen key. The springs of the Linn are adjusted from below by nuts. The top plate on the TT2 is much thicker than the Linn and black. The TT2 has a transport screw for locking down the suspension when shipping. The LP12 does not.

The armboard in the TT2 is thicker but shorter while the LP12 arm board is the full front to back depth of the plinth. It is non-laminated like the older Linn armboards, but unlike the Linn, the Heybrook arm board is made of a plywood sandwich not MDF. Later models had different power supply arrangements. The TT2 bearing and platter are not so heavy as the Linn nor so finely machined. The oil is lighter weight than the Linn bearing oil.

As far as sound quality goes, the TT2 is like a Linn. It has warmth and rhythmn and coloration. It is very comparable to an early Linn LP12 with Basik power supply. It lacks the refinement of the later Linns and the bass foundation of a better power supply, such as the Lingo or Armageddon.

There used to be another saying that " Hamish Robertson who designed the Ariston RD11 was by nature a drinking man and not an entrepreneur. There came into his life a certain Ivor Tiefenbrun who suggested that his fathers' firm, from memory I think was called Castle Engineering, could machine parts for the Ariston turntable. Hamish accepted the offer and soon the product rolled of Ivor's production line.

Imagine the shock some little time later when Ivor appeared at a northern Hi-Fi show with what seemed to be a carbon copy of the RD11 under his arm but now bearing the name Linn LP12.

From the above, it would appear that at least the Ariston and the LP12 were designed by the same engineer, to whit, Hamish Robertson..!!

Hamish, daunted by this, took to his bottle and some time later was found dead at home after a particularly heavy drinking bout. Rumour has it that he had committed suicide but I seem to remember the autopsy showed that he had asphyxiated by inhaling his own vomit.

Ivor's reaction to this sad event is unfortunately not recorded and the demise of Hamish could not have come at a better time for him. Ivor went on to successfully exploit the design as Hi-Fi history will attest.

The Ariston name passed to John Carrick and later emerged as Systemdek.

I believe the marque has since been absorbed by one P. Quortrop of Audio Note fame."
 
M

murray johnson

Guest
This isn't right Dave. there was a considerable period of time when Ariston & Systemdek were operating as two separate and unconnected companies before Ariston closed. I believe the Systemdek IIx design was sold to PQ but I'm not sure the Systemdek name was.

Peter Dunlop who started Systemdek was actively involved in the original Ariston company before leaving to do his own thing.

 

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