Room correction/DSP

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flak monkey

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Thought I would have a go as sorting out the room bass nodes with a bit of EQ. I've spent ages moving my speakers and listening position around and not been able to deal with it that way. And I don't have space for some big bass traps.

The dark red line is the original response plot, the bright red is after some DSP/EQ applied. Could probably do more, but it sounds better to me 😁

before and after.jpg

 

Andrew_C

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Is that R`e`w it looks different but the same dark background?

Did you use the filters the software recommended?

 

Andrew_C

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Sorry for the inquisition what did you use to implement the filters and finally you also lifted the treble?

 

tuga

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Thought I would have a go as sorting out the room bass nodes with a bit of EQ. I've spent ages moving my speakers and listening position around and not been able to deal with it that way. And I don't have space for some big bass traps.

The dark red line is the original response plot, the bright red is after some DSP/EQ applied. Could probably do more, but it sounds better to me 😁

View attachment 107633
May I suggest that you try EQ'ing only up to 500Hz an give it a listen?

To my eyes it looks like the upper-midrange and treble are somewhat exaggerated.

It's definitely a matter of preference but, unless you're listening nearfield, the response should show a tilt like this:

JaIuJKb.jpg


 
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flak monkey

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May I suggest that you try EQ'ing only up to 500Hz an give it a listen?

To my eyes it looks like the upper-midrange and treble are somewhat exaggerated.

It's definitely a matter of preference but, unless you're listening nearfield, the response should show a tilt like this:

Unless the room and position are abslolutely symmetric (they harbly ever are) the filters should be applied to each speaker individually. Not sure if that is what you did.
At the moment I'm experimenting. I can't apply corrections to each channel separately yet. Its in my plan.

The room is actually pretty symmetrical, at least compared to most. Measuring each speaker separately the results are almost identical within the normal variation of such measurements.

I'll have a play with a slope on the overall response. The main thing for me was getting the bass under tighter control. It sounds far better now than it did.

 
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newlash09

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At the moment I'm experimenting. I can't apply corrections to each channel separately yet. Its in my plan.

The room is actually pretty symmetrical, at least compared to most. Measuring each speaker separately the results are almost identical within the normal variation of such measurements.

I'll have a play with a slope on the overall response. The main thing for me was getting the bass under tighter control. It sounds far better now than it did.
I would agree that the above corrected curve, definitely sounds better than no correction :D

Iam too dumb to do this myself, so I used a DSpeaker antimode 2.0, which is a automated correction system in the bass region. And if I remember right, I think it was also running a series of test sweeps, through both the speakers simultaneously for the correction. Since it corrects only upto 150hz, which is below the schroeder frequency of most rooms, I was of the opinion that the output of both speakers could be summed if correcting for a single listening position. And I presume that your goodselves have done something similar. So should be alright in my half baked opinion. If iam wrong, iam sure @tugawill be along shortly :D

 
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2010*zuma

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I always thought an unpaid, unhappy excavator operator worked wonders for some room correction...

.
e0b94944ab329a2e4a9a6214c0e0ddd9.jpg
95b49e700d8e3a2bded3b6cea52bb017.jpg
ccc51e2ba60d6536e87648a3820e6786.jpg
1466cd3eb3fbf8646c0b62c6095a1d25.jpg


Sent from my CLT-L09 using Tapatalk
 

 
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Psilonaught

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May I suggest that you try EQ'ing only up to 500Hz an give it a listen?

To my eyes it looks like the upper-midrange and treble are somewhat exaggerated.

It's definitely a matter of preference but, unless you're listening nearfield, the response should show a tilt like this:

I agree, you shouldn't be boosting the highest frequencies

 

tuga

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Since it corrects only upto 150hz, which is below the schroeder frequency of most rooms, I was of the opinion that the output of both speakers could be summed if correcting for a single listening position.
Unless the room and positioning are absolutely symmetrical the dips and peaks will be different for each speaker. Correcting the response of the two speakers playing together will end up adding dips and peaks where there are none.

Think of an Romantic period orchestral music recording, where the double bass section is usually on the right, or a jazz trio/quartet. If you correct for the pair you are averaging the correction but the sound of the instrument(s) is coming (mostly) from a single speaker.

 
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flak monkey

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I agree, you shouldn't be boosting the highest frequencies
IMO, not a judgement you can make unless you hear the system. It sounds better to me. Will keep playing around with it. But had a long listening session this afternoon comparing with and without correction and I'm happier with it now.

Red line is in room peak levels. On a 20-20k sweep just now.

Screenshot_20220116-151148_Spectroid.jpg

Unless the room and positioning are absolutely symmetrical the dips and peaks will be different for each speaker. Correcting the response of the two speakers playing together will end up adding dips and peaks where there are none.

Think of an orchestral music recording, where the double bass section is on the right, or a jazz trio/quartet. If you correct for the pair you are averaging the correction but the sound is coming (mostly) from a single speaker.
As usual measurements were done using 20-20k sweeps. Not sure I really understand why the bit about stereo recording of instruments is relevant, Ive clearly missed the point. I can see how the interactions between both speakers can affect the results though. I'll put the measurements up from the individual speakers tomorrow when I'm at my laptop. Not that I can do anything about it, I can correct everything or nothing with what I currently have. All I'm doing is messing around with it.

 

tuga

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These measurements were made a few years ago in an asymmetric room. Correcting the average response would leave some of the peaks untouched and add a few dips in either one or the other speaker, all of low amplitude but still a sub-optimal correction.

x0n5Vqs.png


fMOIh4v.png


 
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flak monkey

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These measurements were made a few years ago in an asymmetric room. Correcting the average response would leave some of the peaks untouched and add a few dips in either one or the other speaker, all of low amplitude but still a sub-optimal correction.



My individual measurements for each channel don't have anywhere that much variance. I'll try and post the plots tomorrow. I can see how it would be beneficial to correct individual channels in such cases.

My room is 4x4.5m. All brick walls. Only asymmetry is the outside wall has a window, not a bay, which is on the left side of the room. Normally listen with the curtain shut anyway.

 
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tuga

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My individual measurements for each channel don't have anywhere that much variance. I'll try and post the plots tomorrow. I can see how it would be beneficial to correct individual channels in such cases.

My room is 4x4.5m. All brick walls. Only asymmetry is the outside wall has a window, not a bay, which is on the left side of the room. Normally listen with the curtain shut anyway.
If the response up to 400Hz is identical then I guess it might be OK to corrected the average response. I would avoid the use high-Q filters if possible for room correction below 2-300Hz.

 
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bencat

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I think you are doing things in the right way and adding in your view what is needed then listening and adjusting accordingly . As it is your music with your system in your room then it has to please you and not anyone else's idea of what is right . Never had or used Roon so not sure what is and is not available . I use DIRAC Live and i use it across the full spectrum I tweak the filter from the one it suggests and listen as I alter things . I found it very helpful for me to make some really huge changes and listen to what they did (which was of course make it sound wrong and weired) then slowly bring the filter back up and listen to the music as it slowly changes . This gave me a bit of an idea of what changing each part sounded like and has enabled me to know very closely exactly what filter curve I like and suits my room . Not scientific at all I know but for me at least it works .