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15 minutes ago, Jules_S said:

I did note that you were using a fairly low-powered amp @The Chronicals and was interested to note your comments about the relative volumes of the KEFs vs Q's. Wisdom would have said that with a low-sensitivity speaker you'd struggle for volume (although I note that you say your room isn't huge - not sure what your preferred listening levels are?). Just goes to show that specs aren't the be-all and end-all... ;)

I love my Concept 40's but would happily swap them for the 500's I think (although I "get" the stands for the 300's and quite like the 50's / 60's style influence, they wouldn't work in my room). I think I'm going to need to look again at my sources first though - good though they are for items at the "budget" end of the scale, I think their flaws would be too easily revealed on the end of such revealing speakers.

Yes this is exacrly what I thought. True I don't like loud music and wont ever listen to anything loud, but the PAthos can go LOUD with ease - I think even though it is only classed as 25W, Pathos have there Inpol circuitry which means it pumps much bigger than its figures would suggest. But yes as you say, specs are just specs, measurements are just measurements, they give you an idea, but have no real world meaning in the grand scheme of things. Its like driving a car, the manufacturer will give you a set of specs, MPG, 0-60 etc, but in the real world those figures are very different. 

I would have loved the 500's! but man they are big. Like missile silo big. I also dont believe in using bungs with speakers as they have been tuned to work without, and it changes their whole design, so the room would have to be mentally big for the 500's to work properly. Why not nip into your nearest Sevenoaks with your amp, see how it fares with the 300/500's, you may get a surprise

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36 minutes ago, The Chronicals said:

Why would I want to measure both in my room to get an 'accurate' idea? How dull. 

I have ears. Granted my ears are way better than most, so not everyone is blessed with such organic talent hence needing to measure things,but still. 

(Also not sure how you can have an accurate 'idea')

Do either of you two chaps own QAcoustics speakers, being that this is an owners thread? Lawrence dosent seem to own anything. xD

No but I was impressed with a pair of Concept 40s I heard once.

My system is only visible and audible to those with the most golden ears. The dealer told me it's called the Emperor's New System. Cost me a bloody fortune but me and my mates think it sounds great xD

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2 minutes ago, Lawrence001 said:

No but I was impressed with a pair of Concept 40s I heard once.

My system is only visible and audible to those with the most golden ears. The dealer told me it's called the Emperor's New System. Cost me a bloody fortune but me and my mates think it sounds great xD

Cool, you know its an owners thread right?

How much does it cost and what does it comprise of? Photos or it didn't happen. 

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58 minutes ago, The Chronicals said:

I would have loved the 500's! but man they are big. Like missile silo big. I also dont believe in using bungs with speakers as they have been tuned to work without, and it changes their whole design, so the room would have to be mentally big for the 500's to work properly. Why not nip into your nearest Sevenoaks with your amp, see how it fares with the 300/500's, you may get a surprise

Certainly my experience in a 'normal' sized living room and using half bungs fairly close to rear wall, would suggest otherwise.  They are large and when first installed I wondered whether or not I had done the right thing!  Turn them on and wonder takes on a whole new meaning.  (not knocking the 300s though)

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4 minutes ago, samd said:

Certainly my experience in a 'normal' sized living room and using half bungs fairly close to rear wall, would suggest otherwise.  They are large and when first installed I wondered whether or not I had done the right thing!  Turn them on and wonder takes on a whole new meaning.  (not knocking the 300s though)

Im sure they sound amazing because they are just bloody good speakers, but being bunged up and close to the wall, means they arent performing at their best or how they were designed to perform, thats all I meant.

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Hi all

So I appreciate that this post isn't about Q Acoustics per-se, but as it does involve my Concept 40's in the evaluation I'm about to describe, I hope you'll forgive me. Also this is going to be a "war & peace" posting - I don't do concise :D

So for those following this thread, you'll know that I'm auditioning a couple of stereo amplifiers to replace the underperforming AV amp that's been doing duty in my system for both movies and music. Ignoring the AV stuff, which is of secondary importance, my system is as-described in my profile, with a couple of front ends that I admit are on the "budget" end of things but nevertheless capable of delivering a wholly acceptable-for-the-price performance. My objective, with this audition, is to find an amp that will partner beautifully with my Concept 40's, and survive a couple of future upgrades of front end and (potentially) speakers too.

Musically, I listen to a pretty varied selection of genres, with the exception of hip-hop / rap / r 'n' b and similar. Also my house is a virtually jazz-free zone (with a few fringe exceptions like Nina Simone). I listen to a lot of female vocalists such as Imogen Heap, Annie Lennox, Kate Bush, Fiona Apple, Thea Gilmore, and male vocalists (Bowie, Seal, David Sylvian). Most of my favourite music is absolutely NOT from the audiophile end of the spectrum and hence recording / production quality tends to be very average in the main, with a few "awful"s and a few "amazing"s thrown in for good measure. So what's important to me is that my system can make the very best of what it's given, and turn out a wholly enjoyable result within the limitations of the source. Systems that only shine with the best recordings are no use to me whatsoever. What my systems past and present have always lacked for me is that sense of scale, effortlessness and palpability that gives you the "in the room with me" illusion (and yes, I know it's only my own interpretation of reality, hence the deliberate use of "illusion" in my last statement). I prioritise stereo imaging and dynamics over a ruler-flat frequency response, provided the latter isn't obviously out of kilter and I'm not hung up on timing and rhythm - if the system does it decently I'll be tapping my feet anyway so I'll know!

I decided to go down the Class-D route looking for a suitable amp. A number of factors I won't go into influenced that decision, and from reading and digesting a variety of opinions, both professional and owner, I narrowed the decision down to a few models that fitted the nominal budget. For the past two weeks I've had the Gato Audio DIA-250S here at home on demo. I've also had a preliminary dem of the highly-regarded Peachtree Audio Nova 300, which has previously been noted as being a good match for the Concept 40's. Thanks to the generosity of the seller, I currently have this sat at home with me too, so for the last few days I've been able to compare both amps in my own system, in my own environment and my own time, without the pressures of a dealer showroom and someone keen for a sale. I've also identified the Primare I25 as a possible solution, as well as the NAD M10, however in the interests of not over-complicating things I've not tried to get all the amps together. I know my limits - I'm not a professional reviewer! My though process was that whichever of the two amps I prefer from the current two, I'd consider demoing against one of the other two, and so on until I have a winner.

In one of my earlier posts I relayed my first initial impressions of both the Gato and the Peachtree. I confess my prejudices - I love the design and quality of the Gato and if I'm honest I've been desperate for it to be the out and out winner in the contest. That it didn't acquit itself well on that initial "first blast" of music through my system was, I admit, a deflating moment. I found the sound to be much too forward, bordering on harsh at higher volumes (I have some hearing issues so I tend to listen at higher levels than normal I suppose). In fact it was quite the opposite of what I had been expecting, i.e. this lush sound that almost oozes from the speakers. Given that Q Acoustics voicing is on the fuller, warmer side of the balance, I was at a loss to understand why I heard what I did. Was it my cheapo front end? The cabling? The room? The recordings? A change in my perception versus the sound I've got used to from my AV amp? Tiredness? Electrical interference? All of the above???? I was frustrated and confused.

Assuming that the amp was brand spanking new (it arrived immaculately packaged) I agreed with others on here that it probably needed some days to settle in, so over the next few days I ran it in with a range of different albums on both vinyl & CD. Due to having to have my phono stage serviced the LP front end is currently out of play, so the remainder of my notes are based purely on CD replay via my Cambridge Audio CXC transport and 740C CD player, linked via a Chord Clearway coax. The 740C hence is being used purely as a DAC with its 384kHz upsampling enabled. As front ends go, it's on the detailed, analytical side of things, not in any way euphonic.

So how have things changed over the last 10 days? What I can say is that the Gato and I have settled down to become pretty comfy bedfellows. Whether it's the amp or my perception that's changed more I wouldn't like to say, but what I'm hearing is very different from those first few hours. If I were to give an overall description of the sound, I'd say that it's still on the leaner side, and my room is definitely still having an impact here on this, but the unpleasant harshness that I first heard has definitely abated. What's left is a balanced, involving sound that draws my attention right into the heart of the music. It has a wonderful "hear though" quality that lets you listen right into the mix, following any individual strand of the performance without losing the detail when things start to get complicated.

When the Gato first arrived I appreciated this quality but felt that it was taking things too far, separating out the instrumentation so much that it no longer felt like a performance, but just a collection of different sounds. I suppose this is what the critics of early Class-D were talking about - a "soulless" presentation that doesn't involve you emotionally, and initially I'd have agreed. My foot stayed firmly planted to the floor! However over the past few days I felt that the amp was loosening up and drawing the musicians back together. If the Gato had been a shy person invited to a party, it would have been stood politely on the sidelines for the first hour, smiling to people and trying to be unnoticed. Now it's had a couple of glasses of rum punch, and is dancing shirtless in the middle of the floor! I've begun getting the goosebumps when listening to some of my favourite albums. One example would be the fabulous recording of the Ramirez arrangement of the Misa Criolla (Decca - 467 095-2). Mercedes Sosa's vocals send shivers down my spine when the system gets it right, and her soulful, heartfelt performance absolutely hits the spot now. The way the rest of the choir swells and diminishes behind her during the opening Kyrie is stunning, and on later tracks where the south American instrumentalists and vocalists chime in there's that sense of palpability that I was hoping for, giving real structure to the music. Beautiful stuff.

Proving that the Gato can do it's thang with more rhythm-driven stuff, the opening track "Footsteps" from Alison Moyet's album Hoodoo is a sassy combination of her peerless vocals, backing band and brass. This really got my foot going, the Gato showing that it does do bass, it just doesn't make a big song and dance of it. There's no emphasis in the lower frequencies, but great definition in the bass guitar that's not overshadowed by the drum kit. Despite all that's going on in this quite complex mix, the Gato keeps wonderful composure and carries on digging out that detail and letting you hear whatever bits you choose to tune into.

What convinced me that the amp was definitely losing that initial harshness was listening to one of my absolute favourite albums - "Satellites" by The Big Dish. Not, I think, a well-known band, I came across them many decades ago when I was still doing my Saturday job in my local Tandy, and one of the other sales guys brought in the album "Creeping Up on Jesus". I was absolutely hooked by the fantastic melodies and Steven Lindsay's brittle yet powerful vocals. Played the album to death for months on end, and then discovered their swansong album "Satellites". With a more mature, less "jangly" sound, this one runs from upbeat singalong-and-tap-your-feet (25 years), through to numbers that really tug at the heartstrings (Learn to Love). I heard the album through from end to end, and was really made aware of the variation in the production across the whole album, from tracks that were a bit disorganised to those that just flowed soooo smoothly from the Concept 40's. And therein I realised that the amp was now just getting on with the job of making the most of what it was being fed. Even with the poorer tracks the result was very listenable and I was able to relax and just enjoy each track without being unduly distracted by the sound quality.

I've been through all sorts of albums over the past week, from Lady Antebellum's "Golden" to Underworld "Barking", Kate Bush "Hounds of Love" to the David Sylvian compliation "Everything and Nothing", Jane's Addiction's "Nothings Shocking" (worth it for "Mountain Song" alone) to Heather Nova's "Siren". And the more I listen, the more I'm enjoying what I'm hearing. The thing I like the most is that insightful presentation - the brilliant staging of the various instruments in a three-dimensional space that gives each strand of the music room to breathe without tripping over another, and yet is stall part of the "whole". The upper frequencies sparkle like ripples in water on a sunny day, giving a sense of "air" and tangibility to each instrument. Allied to a bass that can definitely go deep when the music demands, but that stays resolutely under control with no artificial "bloom" or overhang to the notes, it's an alluring combination. Bass lines are taut and have that rhythmic quality without feeling like they're being stifled, and lovely balance. It may help that I've also been lent a pair of Chord Company's Epic speaker cables, which do seem to be helping with the overall presentation compared to the cheaper Chord C-Screen that I usually use. Nonetheless I have to say that I'm becoming more and more impressed by the Gato each day.

Issues? I still have some reservations about the leanness in the presentation that can make the sound appear more forward. I'm concerned that living with it long term may prove to be wearing. I've been down this road before, however - one of my previous setups used a pair of Wilson Benesch Curves, and they could be pretty ruthless. However I am also pretty certain that my living room has a lot to answer for in this respect as there's a commonality to the sound of both that earlier system (from memory), the Gato and also the Peachtree (see later). I am currently working to understand the acoustics of my room, and I'm prepared to give the Gato the benefit of the doubt on this for the moment, as I feel that with proper preparation, I can dial-out a bit of that forwardness.

On a practical front if I decide to keep it I'll need to find a way to manage three analogue inputs (LP, CD, AV). The Gato has a home theatre bypass facility that will help with the latter, but there are only two sets of unbalanced RCA inputs and one set of balanced, so I might have to consider a change to the front end, swapping my longstanding 740C CD player-used-as-a-DAC for something with a balanced output, possibly even the 840C if I can get one. Incidentally, I tried the Gato's built-in DAC and wasn't impressed compared to running my 740C in on the analogue inputs - I felt it squashed the life out of the recording and restricted the dynamic and frequency ranges, so that's not an option, for me. That said, it's more than good enough for me to feed the optical input from my Sonos Connect into for non-critical listening and internet radio. Oh, and just a passing mention of the fact that the Gato has built-in Bluetooth wireless streaming capability. I paired it with my iPhone to test it, out of curiosity really. And... it works. Enough said. Again, fine for non-critical listening, and a nice-to-have feature but for me, of little interest.

So what of the Peachtree? Obviously my initial demo in an unfamiliar location was still sufficiently impressive for me to consider getting it home for a proper audition. The seller was kind enough to agree to lend it to me for a few days so I can get to grips with it properly and see if it proves to be a match, or more than a match, for the Gato. The Peachtree Nova 300 is in some ways a better solution for me, having a better feature set (a "loop" facility that could be potentially used as a third unbalanced analogue input, and a volume bypass facility on all available inputs). It's also a lovely looking thing, the example I have being finished in the piano black lacquer (a Rosewood- type finish is also available). It's notionally more powerful than the Gato, being rated at 300W as compared to the Gato's 250W but as I got nowhere near to the latter's limit at home before my eardrums brought out the white flags, I don't think there's much in it. Suffice to say both amps would no doubt drive far more demanding speakers than the Concept 40's with ease and little sign of strain, they both have a lovely muscular grip on the Q's bass / mid drivers and provided the control that I felt they were looking for.

I'm going to describe the Peachtree in terms of comparison to the Gato rather than outright as I feel I've hopefully given you enough of an insight into the latter for you to understand how I perceived the differences. What both amps have in common is that muscularity, obviously not on a US mega-amp scale but more than enough to give music the underpinning it needs. The Nova 300 bops along really well, and to begin with I found myself tapping my foot more often than I did with the Gato. What seemed immediately obviously is that it had a lot more bass - it delivered a fuller, more powerful sound than the Gato, which was left sounding a bit emaciated by comparison. It's very easy to relax into the music with the Nova 300, with nothing obviously out of place. 

The more I listened however, the more I became more aware of the unevenness of the bass in my room. The Nova 300 seemed to upset the room more and caused me to notice more room modes than the Gato did. On the Underworld track "Always Loved a Film" from the aforementioned album "Barking", there's one particular bass note (I think it's a B) that sets my room off into a fit of apoplexy. The Gato did it, but it was even more noticeable with the Nova, and in addition there were other albums that set off other resonances I hadn't noticed with the Gato. Now that may be the fault of my lousy living room rather than the amp, but I have to consider the room as part of the hi-fi too, and it's the one thing I can't really change. So although the Peachtree gave that initial impression of being more even, in fact it became less so on prolonged listening. I also noticed that due to the extra "oomph" (if you will) in the bass, Alison Moyet's vocals took on a "plummy" quality that wasn't particularly pleasant, almost as though she has nasal congestion. Switching back to the Gato initially makes you think she's shrunk, but on balance I felt was a more accurate and pleasant interpretation. I found the same on Sara Bareilles album "The Blessed Unrest". Sara has a wide vocal range, and I found that on both "Chasing the Sun" and "Satellite Call" suffered from a combination of bloom and "shoutiness", if that's such a term!

Conversely, and despite the initial impressions, it was the Peachtree that also seemed to emphasis the mid to upper-mid range that bit more, and I felt less and less comfortable turning up the volume levels. I can't explain this as when I consider the overall presentation I'd have expected the Gato to be the more wearing to listen to at high volumes. Nevertheless, I found myself backing-off the decibels more with the Nova 300. We're hardly talking about PA-levels of nastiness here, but I just felt a bit uncomfortable at times. Again, this may very well be because my room is accentuating those parts of the frequency range, and the Nova 300 is performing more strongly there than the Gato. Nonetheless it was a surprise and not for the better.

One exception to all of that was with the new album from "Wild Things" from Ladyhawke. For those not familiar, this is an electronic-led female-vocal led album, with reasonable but not exceptional production. Maybe because of that, I enjoyed the album more through the Peachtree than the Gato, with the more "beefy" presentation of the former giving it the edge.

One area that I felt the Gato absolutely ran rings around the Peachtree was in imaging. Initially the latter sets up a tangible stereo image and I actually thought it had the measure of the Gato. Main vocalists are thrown further forward in the room than the Gato, which tends to present them more in the same plane as other instruments. This lent the presentation a more "sit up and listen" quality that made me very much aware of the singer. However, as soon as the music starts to get complicated, the tables were turned. Despite the Gato having a flatter "front" to the image, it extended so much further widthwise and rearwards, setting up the performers in a far larger space and giving them each room to breathe. Thanks to that "hear through" quality I mentioned earlier, l felt that it was just as easy to listen to the main vocalist as it was via the Nova 300, even though they weren't as prominent. The Peachtree seemed to run out of ideas with complex mixes, presenting a more homogenous performance that lacked clarity, although to be fair to it, probably gave a little more cohesion to the performance. It also works really well on simpler performances where I was more aware of a proper sense of depth and height to the imaging.

So... what to make of it all? It probably sounds as though I've been pretty tough on the Peachtree Nova 300, but in fact I have to say that it's a cracking amp with tons and tons going for it. In isolation, had I not heard the Gato, would I have been able to live with it long term? I'm going to cop-out here a bit and say "possibly". Not that I think there's much wrong with the Nova 300, and I think it makes a very good match with the concept 40's, as I was led to believe. However the elephant in the room is, unfortunately, the room itself, and the combination of the two just rubbed each other up the wrong way, to the point where I found certain albums difficult to listen to at my preferred volume level. I also preferred the more open and slightly less rich presentation of the Gato audio. In a different room, the tables may have turned. Unfortunately there's little chance of me moving house or changing listening rooms in the forseeable future, and for me the Gato wins out.

A few last little things I noticed during this test. The display on the Gato is a white dot-matrix style split either side of the volume control. It shows input and volume level, or can be set to show the sampling rate for digital inputs if that's your thing. The lovely part is that it is easily visible from almost 6m away across my room. The remote control is slim and feels well-made, although having two different methods of selecting inputs (individual buttons per input AND a pair of up/down buttons to cycle through them in order) feels a bit over the top and confusing. My other half kept hitting the input select ones instead of the volume up/down, cue a few choice words! That aside the Gato is beautifully built and finished, the speaker terminals and RCA jacks are quality items, and the former a tight fit for banana plugs - I struggled to disconnect the Chord plugs when swapping between amplifiers! The volume control is a thing of joy to operate, having that sort of old-school tuner weighted feel to it when you spin it. It's rather "low-geared" though - it takes a lot of twisting to get the volume up to moderate levels from zero.

The Peachtree Nova 300 is also well-made, although given the difference in materials it may not exude that "hewn from solid" feel of the Gato. Nevertheless it looks absolutely beautiful in the gloss black finish, the front fascia is beautifully made and logically laid out. One area it scores over the Gato big-time is in the inclusion of a 1/4" headphone socket on the front panel - the Gato lacks any form of concession to headphone listening whatsoever. I didn't try it out for quality, but it least it does permit private listening without having to add a separate headphone amp to the Gato's pre-outs. The Peatchtree lacks a balanced analogue input, but counters that with an additional optical input, USB-A AND B inputs (the former optimised for connecting i-Things if Apple is your flavour of choice) and an optional wi-fi module for network streaming. I wasn't supplied with the correct remote for the Nova 300, but for one of their wi-fi speaker thingies, so it covered the basic volume / mute functions but couldn't change inputs or select the loop (which you can use to insert something like a room EQ setup). I'm assuming that the proper remote is very similar, in which case it's also a nice item with a comfy notch in the back for your index finger. Easy to use and with a nice brushed metallic face plate.

I'll miss the Peachtree Nova 300, it's been fun having it here but I think I'm sticking with the Gato DIA-250S for now. Next up, if I have the appetite for it, is a comparison with the Primare I25. Thing is, I'm really enjoying the Gato so I might just wait a little while and get properly seduced by its charms before I play the part of the fickle owner!

And while I think of it., what of the Q Acoustics Concept 40's? As far as I'm concerned they acquitted themselves fabulously throughout all the auditioning, including the initial Peachtree trial on the mezzanine floor of a small industrial unit! They possess all the qualities I love, being easy to listen to, generating a good scale and focused soundstage and being rewarding when given the right support. They've really blossomed being driven by the two amps, showing me that there's more to come from them yet, and I think they'll benefit from more fine tuning of positioning and the room acoustics. I think they're keepers for the moment, until I get the courage to listen to their bigger Concept 500 cousins.

Hope you found some of this waffling useful, all thoughts, opinions, questions etc very welcome. :flowers:

Jules

P.S. Do I get an award for the longest-ever post, or do I have to try harder? lol

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@Jules_S Great insight - which makes comment easier....and FWIW. some of my meanderings have been so long, I've split them into 3 parts.

My thoughts on your post would be as follows (and some are a repetition of what I've said before):

- You are well on your way to hearing what the Gato is capable of - to the point that it should be possible to get it sounding "Right".

- Can you describe your room - Suspended Wooden Floor? Is it Laminate? What other shiny, reflective surfaces are there? Soft furnishings? Size and shape? Speaker and seating position in relation to the walls/corners? What about some photographs?

- I have the Gato driving some Harbeth 40.2s, which with room reinforcement, are pretty much Full Range...and I can assure you that the Amp isn't Lean. On certain tracks, the whole room vibrates.

- When an Amp exerts decent control over the Bass Drivers, it can come across as "Leaner than you are used to". If you get the bass, when it's on the recording, then it's doing its job. I can suggest tracks with serious bass, if you wish.

- If there is any silver in your cables, I strongly suggest buying (or borrowing) some copper ones. I would suggest cheap Linn Blacks from eBay as I/Cs and some 6mm OFC copper S/C, from the likes Van Damme or Mogami...Or Linn K20 (4mm) 

- If you have mitigated the room as much as possible (which includes the isolation of the Speakers); and removed any Silver Cabling...and are still getting a leaness of presentation, then it's time to look at components.

- IME. Proper isolation of the Speakers can make a dramatic difference to the bass

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Hi @CnoEvil

I've posted details of my room in another thread so I won't repeat myself here, but the basics are:

Room is part-solid, part-suspended floor (the bit where the hi-fi is is suspended)

Carpeted but lots of hard surfaces to the sides

A picture paints a thousand words so here's a couple. Forgive the weird perspectives in the second one - it's a panoramic shot to show the whole room from the seating position (imagine it as an L-shaped room with the bit on the left off at a perfect 90 degree angle and you'll get the idea). Excuse the dog!

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_1365.thumb.jpg.9acf2a5da8c2b964e107648cd355bdf5.jpgUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_1361.thumb.jpg.cd806e85ef4528cb1b27e64ab1339664.jpg

There are very few possible placements for the hi-fi rack except where it is or back over in the dining area. That, however, requires a long run of speaker cable, around 14m and also puts it rather near to a radiator. Curtains for the patio doors are forthcoming - there's a wooden Venetian there at the moment that I drop down and tilt slightly when listening, in an attempt to at least break up some of the reflection. Behind the listening position (sofa is 1m in from the rear wall) on the wall is a large rug. There's nothing in the back corners yet although surround speakers will be appearing eventually, and hopefully some bass traps if I can fit them in (and get them past the better half!)

Another plan I have is to isolate the speakers as you have suggested. I have some 6mm acoustic insulation (the company is called Acoustiblok if you want to look it up) - it's like a heavy rubbery material. I was going to have an experiment by using two layers of that between three quartz floor tiles to make a multi-layer sandwich, and swap the spikes on the bottom of the speakers for some soft feet (to stop the speakers sliding everywhere on the tiles). I might even do 3 layers insulation / 4 tiles - push the boat out, why not? :D

I have been doing my auditioning mainly with a set of Chord Epic cables that I was kindly lent. 6m length, factory terminated with their spade / banana plugs. It's a silver plated copper design. I've given those back now with the Peachtree amp, and reverted to my Chord C-Screen, which is all copper. I have noticed a degree of reduction in the harshness which is welcome, but also a drop in "sparkle" and a less-defined stereo image as a result. What I'd really like is to find something that gives all the lovely detail and separation / spaciousness of the Epic, but with the smoothness of the basic C-Screen.

Oh, and I'm using Van den Hul First Ultimate Mk II RCAs - I've used the Mk I for years and like the presentation. Digital Coax is a Chord Clearway.

I've also been noticing that the Gato needs a good hour to start coming on song. From cold it sounds bass-light and lacklustre. As it warms, that starts to change and after an hour it begins to deliver. Last night I was listening to an old Seal album (Seal II, as it happens) and halfway through one song, I think it was "People Asking Why", something seemed to happen to the sound - it was as though you got hold of the musical canvas and stretched it out in all directions, increasing the space, the clarity, the insight... it was weird and wonderful at the same time. Mains-related? Or is the Gato just stepping up another notch with even more "on-time"?

Incidentally, and this a question for all Concept 40 owners - to bung, or not to bung? And how do you position them? I'm running them bung-free, and as you can see quite a way in from the rear wall (partly for practical reasons and partly because I prefer them that way).

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@Jules_S Thank you for posting all that.

I love your room, but ATM efforts to mitigate the suspended floor should probably be your highest priority.

Hopefully your efforts to isolate will work, but if it doesn't, you could look at Auralex Sub Dude or Gramma - which sorted my problem when I had Floorstanders. I now use Something Solid "Missing Link" isolating spike shoes for my Harbeths.

i like Linn K200, for its mixture of musicality and sparkle.

Van Den Hul has a (maybe unfair) reputation for being a bit Van Den Dull. Again, I like Linn Silver I/Cs (all Copper).

I leave my Gato on Standby...and I recon it takes maybe half an hour to come on song.

How many hours has the Gato clocked up now? I recon it improves a lot up to 40 or 50 hours and maybe a little after that.

I do believe that "dirty mains" can have an effect, with music sounding better outside "heavy use" times, like late at night or Sunday Mornings.

Edited by CnoEvil
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I love a good Pinter-esque rambling! :) 

Still think you need Class A and stop doing the merrygo round with class D..it never gets anynbetter and you kid yourself into thinking its good...then you get a quality Class A and you realise all that pissing around was a complete waste of time :) but that Gato is one good looking piece of kit. Looks matter! Thats why I got into Pathos initially, the Remix units wither their industrial design are just boss. So I ended up with the Classic Remix (class A/B) and then the Inpol Remix 2 (Class A). 

I had a Peachtree Nova 125SE...it eas liveable and good at what it did, but overall, harsh, fatiguing, and just empty sounding like most Class D I have tried. 

Chord Epic cables are a good choice for the Concept 40's, they inject a little spice into them but I found them ultimately harsh. I personally just don't like silver in anything audio related.

Edited by The Chronicals
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18 minutes ago, The Chronicals said:

I love a good Pinter-esque rambling! :) 

Still think you need Class A and stop doing the merrygo round with class D..it never gets anynbetter and you kid yourself into thinking its good...then you get a quality Class A and you realise all that pissing around was a complete waste of time :) but that Gato is one good looking piece of kit. Looks matter! Thats why I got into Pathos initially, the Remix units wither their industrial design are just boss. So I ended up with the Classic Remix (class A/B) and then the Inpol Remix 2 (Class A). 

I had a Peachtree Nova 125SE...it eas liveable and good at what it did, but overall, harsh, fatiguing, and just empty sounding like most Class D I have tried. 

Chord Epic cables are a good choice for the Concept 40's, they inject a little spice into them but I found them ultimately harsh. I personally just don't like silver in anything audio related.

I owned a full Class A (MF AMS 35i) and now a Gato.

With many speakers I would take the Class A, but not so much on the big Harbeths.

If you don't want the downsides of Class A and want a vfm, aesthetically pleasing, musical and versatile amp - Gato ticks a lot of boxes.

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Just now, CnoEvil said:

I owned a full Class A (MF AMS 35i) and now a Gato.

With many speakers I would take the Class A, but not so much on the big Harbeths.

If you don't want the downsides of Class A and want a vfm, aesthetically pleasing, musical and versatile amp - Gato ticks a lot of boxes.

Theres downsides of Class A?

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1 minute ago, CnoEvil said:

I'm happy to list them. :geek:

Yeah deffo, I havent found any yet! apart from not worrying about nasty digital class D sound xD

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Class ‘D’ isn’t digital.

Keith

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  • oldius changed the title to Q Acoustics

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