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chebby

Fresh, hand ground, coffee. A revelatation!

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A daughter was asking me what i’d like for Christmas the other day just as I was at that point in the Ipcress File where he is preparing his morning coffee by grinding the beans with a neat little battery powered coffee grinder. So - at a loss for ideas - I asked for a coffee grinder. 

Today I opened her present to find a neat little Hunt Brothers manual grinder, a bag of Waitrose Colombian beans (medium roast) and a ‘three cup’ cafetiere from Sainsburys. (Enough for one mug.)

No-one else in the house is into coffee so this is the perfect one-man coffee ‘kit’ for me.

I have just tried it out (instructions on YouTube), using a fairly coarse setting, and the results blew me away! 

I was expecting something like a Costa/Starbucks Americano in flavour but this is ten times better. Why? 

All I can say is their beans can’t be much good.

Edited by chebby
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If at a later date, if you go for a Bialetti Expresso Pot....the taste of the coffee takes another big jump in improvement. The type you go for, depends on whether you use an induction hob, or not.

Bialetti Moka Express Espresso Maker, 2 Cup ,Silver

Bialetti Venus Induction Espresso Maker 4 Cup

The type of Grinder makes a difference....and Burr Grinders keep more of the flavour.

Edited by CnoEvil

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14 minutes ago, CnoEvil said:

If at a later date, if you go for a Bialetti Expresso Pot....the taste of the coffee takes another big jump in improvement. The type you go for, depends on whether you use an induction hob, or not.

Bialetti Moka Express Espresso Maker, 2 Cup ,Silver

Bialetti Venus Induction Espresso Maker 4 Cup

The type of Grinder makes a difference....and Burr Grinders keep more of the flavour.

Mine says it is a burr grinder.

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2 minutes ago, chebby said:

Mine says it is a burr grinder.

I know. It said so on the ad.

You can mess around with the coarseness of the grind....as it effects the taste.

An Expresso pot makes the coffee strong......so if not having a small expresso cup, it can be put in a mug and well diluted.

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Thanks.

This little grinder and cafetiere suits me for now. I need something simple and quick (and quiet) for those early starts at home (where I work from most of the time) but that is also easy to carry in to work for those occasional team sessions we have starting at 04:00 on a Sunday morning! (Now I can avoid the instant or machine **** that I usually have to suffer there.)

I’ve kept the cafetiere’s box for transporting it on such occasions.

Edited by chebby

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FWIW. The Bialetti is also quick, simple and quieter than a boiling kettle....makes better coffee...and isn't made of glass.....and doesn't have a plunger that gets gunked up - not that I'm trying to talk you into an upgrade, or anything. :ph34r:

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We have an induction hob and a Grunwerg Cafe Ole model like the one shown under the Bialetti.

It is fairly new, being used twice and gets loaded with Lavazza, then the hob ring is set at 6 which is the recommended temperature for coffee prep, upon completion removed for serving.

However, both times our efforts have resulted in burnt coffee. Odd as we used to have a gas hob set on high and the Bialetti never experienced any duff results.

Would be surprised if it’s the coffee granual size, but the lower chamber is where the burnt grounds are deposited.

Perplexed.

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Super Wammer

Glad you’re enjoying it!  

We seem to have almost every permutation at home - cafetière, filter, Nespresso machine, even instant!  Only have a blade grinder though, as we rarely grind our own, and have never tried a stove top machine either.  

In particular I find Starbucks too burned and nutty tasting for everyday enjoyment.  Costa is better and can be very good, but there’s nothing like fine tuning to your own taste at home.  

The other thing we find is even brand coffees vary considerably from batch to batch. Lavazza Red or Black label is one of the best, we find, and it still comes in 250 gram bags, not 227 or 200 as many do now. 

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When I first got an induction hob I got a pot like the lower one in CnoEvil's photo, and that seemed always to burn the coffee. I've now got a Bialetti Induction. It works well. And I always use Lavazza Rosso or Illy coffee.

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9 minutes ago, Guzziboy said:

When I first got an induction hob I got a pot like the lower one in CnoEvil's photo, and that seemed always to burn the coffee. I've now got a Bialetti Induction. It works well. And I always use Lavazza Rosso or Illy coffee.

The lower one is a Bialetti (Venus) Induction Hob version.

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I think the Venus was the one I got originally. I was never keen on it. Then I found this one in a small shop in Amalfi. It's a lot better.

8245185E-7F69-4ECB-9A32-22D66799A5EA.jpeg

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We use a Sage Bean to cup which is really good with a can of Illy cos I've got the grind coarseness spot on through experiment.  Different brands require different grinds.

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Having broken several glass cafetieres, I was in a cafe and they had stainless steel ones. Best thing I ever bought. Twin walled; keeps the coffee roasting hot for half an hour. And can't be broken. They come in large and small. Mine holds exactly one large mugful.

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I only drink freshly ground...

image.jpeg.7202ab08c388f6eb9d4619deb0751df7.jpeg

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How ever you make your coffee the most significant upgrade (can't get away from hi-fi lingo!) is to have freshly roasted coffee beans and grind them just before making your drink.  The hand grinder described by the OP is perfect for small amounts.  Coffee is at it's best between 3 to 14 days after roasting and then gradually goes stale (and much quicker if it is already ground).  With 'best before' dates upto and beyond 6 months on supermarket coffee there is no knowing when it was roasted and taste suffers accordingly.

Much like recent abundance of micro breweries there are many small batch producers of coffee on the internet who will post out to you.  I have a subscription (with Rave Coffee) which means that every week i get a bag of coffee that has been roasted no more than 2-3 days beforehand.  In my case an espresso blend as I use a machine but for a cafetière lighter roasts and single origin coffees opens up a truly wide range of flavours from fruity to mocha.  

Edited by lostwin
Clarification

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