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Passive Akubariks and Akudoriks will be phased out

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1 hour ago, Derkali said:

Ohhh schoolmaster David the Islander has spoken :geek:  

No, never a schoolmaster, just a pedant. That one I couldn't resist ... :) 

I think that I managed to get past 4,000 posts on the old Linn forum. All gone now. :( 

David

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22 hours ago, DavidHB said:

No, never a schoolmaster, just a pedant. That one I couldn't resist ... :) 

Hello, David,
this is very OT now, but you disappoint me because you don't seem to know the etymology of the word pedant, teacher, schoolmaster. The term pedant has a negative connotation, even in the English language. I am therefore surprised that you consciously refer to yourself as such, especially since pedantry is one of the core symptoms of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (ICD-10: F60.5).
But as the saying goes: self-knowledge is the first path to recovery. 

Karl

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30 minutes ago, Derkali said:

Hello, David,
this is very OT now, but you disappoint me because you don't seem to know the etymology of the word pedant, teacher, schoolmaster. The term pedant has a negative connotation, even in the English language. I am therefore surprised that you consciously refer to yourself as such, especially since pedantry is one of the core symptoms of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (ICD-10: F60.5).
But as the saying goes: self-knowledge is the first path to recovery. 

Karl

I think he knows. 

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6 minutes ago, arm said:

I think he knows. 

I think so, too ... :) 

David

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Karl,

and ‘David the Islander’ means what exactly? Is that some type of compliment where you come from...?

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Super Wammer
22 minutes ago, Gussy said:

Karl,

and ‘David the Islander’ means what exactly? Is that some type of compliment where you come from...?

I’m sure Karl has his reasons, but I saw it as simply a reference to David living on the island called the Isle of Wight.

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6 minutes ago, Nopiano said:

I’m sure Karl has his reasons, but I saw it as simply a reference to David living on the island called the Isle of Wight.

It isn’t.

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6 minutes ago, Nopiano said:

I saw it as simply a reference to David living on the island called the Isle of Wight.

So did I, actually. Incidentally, by the local definition, I don't qualify to be an Islander, which means someone born here. 

David 

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1 minute ago, DavidHB said:

So did I, actually. Incidentally, by the local definition, I don't qualify to be an Islander, which means someone born here. 

David 

David,

’...the islander’ is a derogatory remark aimed at Brits from German native speakers. It is a personal insult. Another favourite is ‘Inselaffe’ which means ‘island monkeys’

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20 minutes ago, DavidHB said:

So did I, actually. Incidentally, by the local definition, I don't qualify to be an Islander, which means someone born here. 

David 

You be a furriner!

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25 minutes ago, Gussy said:

David,

’...the islander’ is a derogatory remark aimed at Brits from German native speakers. It is a personal insult. Another favourite is ‘Inselaffe’ which means ‘island monkeys’

Really? I am a native German speaker and I haven't heard this interpretation before... 

The term 'Inselaffe' I never heard before, but this one is obvioulsy intended as insult. 

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28 minutes ago, Gussy said:

’...the islander’ is a derogatory remark aimed at Brits from German native speakers. It is a personal insult. Another favourite is ‘Inselaffe’ which means ‘island monkeys’

Ah. Clearly a gap in my knowledge. That's what you get for learning German by studying Goethe and Schiller. And if it's derogatory, that doesn't translate very well. With the initial capital and apart from the obvious meaning, in English,  (the Britten-Norman) Islander is an aeroplane.

18 minutes ago, MickC said:

You be a furriner!

The correct term is "overner" (someone from over on the North Island).

David

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On 31/05/2020 at 10:48, DavidHB said:

So did I, actually. Incidentally, by the local definition, I don't qualify to be an Islander, which means someone born here. 

David 

So, outsider ? 

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, arm said:

So, outsider ? 

No, as I said, "overner" - a dialect word meaning "someone from over there". It works out like this..

"Overner" is any incomer, however long they stay. My mother-in-law lived here for 75 years, but she was always an overner.

"Islander" is a person born here. My late wife was an Islander.

"Caulkhead" means someone whose family were all born and have lived on the Island for at least three generations (different people will give you a different number). This was originally a term of abuse coined by Royal Navy sailors ("caulk" is the villainous mixture of hemp fibres and tar used to seal gaps between planks on wooden sailing ships), but is now, in the way of such things, claimed as an honourable distinction. However, my mother-in-law, Edwardian through and through, firmly instructed her daughters not to marry Caulkheads under any circumstances, "because of the inbreeding, dear".

David

Edited by DavidHB
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