plasticpenguin

World of Soul

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On 04/12/2019 at 18:11, Bazzer said:

Double header from the masters of choreography , not a soulful voice as such but what a voice .

That reminds me. Not Soul but were the kings of Disco in the mid-late 1970s.

More traditional.

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James Browns 70s LPs are superb, intelligent, raw, with some heavy weight musicians behind him, quite something, the best IMO is 'Payback', a double LP of epic proportions with a story to beat any bullshit prog lp anyday.

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35 minutes ago, SCIDB said:

Hi,

Russell Tomkins Jr is still alive.

You just said that twice! So he must be! ;-)

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Anything that's black and moves you counts IMHO.

When I was growing up "white soul brothers" was a simple insult - white people didn't do soul. Even though the Northern Soul scene was huge - I can't remember any white people singing on any of the 7"'s. I'm still struggling to think of one and I'd like to so as not to appear racist. There must be one somewhere. Surely?  Sat here listening to the Atlantic Box Set and many of those artists truly had soul. If I could think of a white person who could sing like Otis Redding, Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, many of the Phili stars (like Lou Rawls or the O'Jays) or, say, James Brown I would mention them trust me!

Someone help me out!!!   :)

That's not to say, white musicians don't move me. Of course they do. Just in a different way. Country. Rock. Classical. Dusty Springfield on Dusty in Memphis is smooth as they come. Just not when it comes to real soul.

NB, Looks like Randy could use a good dentist...

Edited by Tune
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Agreed, white singers can't do soul like black artists. It isn't pretty watching Randy sing but she sure has a lovely voice, as does Gladys and sooo many more black singers from that era. Can't think of many white voices that would come close, Dusty and Karen Carpenter maybe.

White artists can Funk :)

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Where was the vocal :) You see, for me now, it's an average backing track for some proper music, the sort session musicians would bring together for an artist in those days.

I remember it well so I'm not knocking it 100%. It was popular and it introduced many white folk to black music. I AM saying however that, IMHO, if the guys weren't white and from Scotland, it would never have got ten minutes of airplay on Radio 1. 

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Anything that's black and moves you counts IMHO.
When I was growing up "white soul brothers" was a simple insult - white people didn't do soul. Even though the Northern Soul scene was huge - I can't remember any white people singing on any of the 7"'s. I'm still struggling to think of one and I'd like to so as not to appear racist. There must be one somewhere. Surely?  Sat here listening to the Atlantic Box Set and many of those artists truly had soul. If I could think of a white person who could sing like Otis Redding, Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, many of the Phili stars (like Lou Rawls or the O'Jays) or, say, James Brown I would mention them trust me!
Someone help me out!!!  
That's not to say, white musicians don't move me. Of course they do. Just in a different way. Country. Rock. Classical. Dusty Springfield on Dusty in Memphis is smooth as they come. Just not when it comes to real soul.
NB, Looks like Randy could use a good dentist...
Have to disagree with this. Plenty of white singers made sone great soul music.

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

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Have to disagree with this. Plenty of white singers made sone great soul music.

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk



Try this link
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dean_Parrish

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

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Since the sad demise a few years ago of Sharon Jones and Charles Bradley, both on the Daptone label, Colemine Records seems to stepping up to the plate  of late especially with this new release It's Only Us by Monophonics. An old sounding, old school soul LP presented in an old style heavy cardboard tip-on sleeve with powerhouse vocals by (the white - see above posts :S) Kelly Finnegan .

Jazzman Records

Also, I must mention last year's American Love Call by Durand Jones And The Indications, also on Colemine Records, and one of my top 5 albums from 2019. Saw them live at Nile Rogers' curated Meltdown Festival at London's Southbank last August and they we're brilliant.  Like the Monophonics, they have that old school vibe with vocals shared by the more typical soul voice of Durand Jones and the falsetto of drummer Aaron Frazer (white again - who would have thought?!).

Durand Jones & the Indications: American Love Call Album Review ...

If you like soul music both are worthy of your hard-earned.

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