papillon

Acoustic Treament (Furnitures)

Recommended Posts

Hello,

Seeing that installing usual acoustic treatment panels will be a waf issue, do you have some information on sellers of furnitures for a living room that could improve the sound. Even if not as great as specific panels?

for example yesterday, a hifi seller told me that the back wall behing the speakers could be covered with a tv-wall furniture. Carpets also of course.

thanks for your different ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no specific information on this but if we are talking about treatment of highs and mids I believe that any ordinary furniture in a non-minimalistic living room will have a beneficial impact on the sound. A not too well organized bookshelf will be a good diffuser and if the books have some distance to the back wall of the shelf the arrangement will also constitute a Helmholtz resonator. If the bookshelf further can be placed in the first reflection point the impact will be great. A thick rug in front of the speakers (first reflection point again) will be beneficial. I think an upholstered sofa close to a wall even will have impact on lower frequencies. (But, many thanks to Linn for Space Optimization. :)). In my opinion ordinary furniture well placed will do the job and the WAF threshold will be quite low.

Edited by HansBertil
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found that using thick curtains can have a very beneficial effect on sound quality 

Spending the time to place the speakers in the ideal position is extremely helpful.

Large potted plants can act as diffusers.

As HansBertil mentions book racks as effective diffusers, so are racks of records.

Having good solid HiFi furniture that holds all your HiFi equipment can be very helpful, as well as ensuring that you have physically separated all your mains cables away from your other cables, by at least 10cm.
 

If you do decide to place some acoustic panels in the room, at some point, my acoustic panel manufacturer suggests diffusers should be on one side of the room, and absorption panels on the opposite side of the room.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always wondered if you could put oil paintings, or posters over acoustic panels? Would this new "skin" on them reduce their efficacy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I am going to have a go at building my own panels. Going to try tree branches of different diameters cut down into varying heights and then glued down onto plywood with a wood picture frame. I think the wall behind my new Spendor speakers will benefit...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Jail4CEOs2 said:

I've always wondered if you could put oil paintings, or posters over acoustic panels? Would this new "skin" on them reduce their efficacy?

Hard to say. 

If you had paintings painted on canvas, that may help absorb some of the mids and highs, but is it is painted on wood or paper rag, then maybe not as effective. It would probably act more like a diffuser.

There are many manufacturers, such as ATS,  of acoustic panels that allow you to digitally send them pictures , and then they print the pictures right in the absorption panel.

One of the guys in Texas has 4 or 5 acoustic panels that covered the rear wall, with full size pictures of Jimmy Hendrix, John Lennon and so on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Jail4CEOs2 said:

I've always wondered if you could put oil paintings, or posters over acoustic panels? Would this new "skin" on them reduce their efficacy?

I think, if the panel is porous it might not be beneficial to add an airtight skin on it. Not saying it wouldn’t work, but it will not work as intended. But the oil painting as such will have an effect without a panel behind. The question is which, however.

Edit: Having a look on the great web on membrane absorbers one find that an oil painting with some lossy material behind might work. But maybe the arrangement needs to be airtight on the rear side. Then the crux is to predict the frequency.

Edited by HansBertil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, PhotoMax said:

I think I am going to have a go at building my own panels. Going to try tree branches of different diameters cut down into varying heights and then glued down onto plywood with a wood picture frame. I think the wall behind my new Spendor speakers will benefit...

Yes, something like at his would be an extremely effective diffuser, and with your carpentry skills you could easily build this 

https://vicoustic.com/product/multifuser-wood-mkii?g=0&multifuser-wood-colors=Natural Wood&multifuser-wood-size=64

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GIK Acoustics in the UK do Art Panels - picture on canvass over an acoustic panel.  You can chose one of their images or upload your own.  They ship WW but there must be local suppliers in most major countries.

http://gikacoustics.co.uk/product-category/acoustic-art-panels/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-ZLVtdvl5wIVQrTtCh0azgKoEAAYASAAEgKGXPD_BwE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know what an "acoustic panel" is, but if it's a sound absorber, then instead, you could install heavy curtains. This will tame the RT60.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, papillon said:

I meant sound absorber. curtains on the windows yes, but on the wall behind the speakers??

Anywhere but behind the speakers. I've tried sound absorption behind the speakers. It made things worse. All you need to do is clap your hands once in the room. Listen for a secondary echo. This is what you want to go away, and the curtains will do just that. You should hear some reverb, as you want the music to be lively, not dead.

Edited by akamatsu
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would think posters or paintings (with complete paint coverage) would cover the acoustic function of the panels?
 

Images printed on canvas might be better as there is airflow through the fibers. 

I have several of my photographs printed on canvas. There are pros and cons to this print method. The upside is you upload your edited image to a printing company and they ship you a mounted image on stretched canvas ready to hang on your wall. No framing, matting or heavy glass needed. The downside to printed canvas is that that the image detail takes a hit. You give up quality with the fabric. But if you take care with the style of image this can look great, ESPECIALLY if the viewing distance from the print is not too close. The closer you get the more fibers of the canvas becomes obvious...

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.