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16 hours ago, CJ1045 said:

What is the problem with VTF accuracy and the Ekos? I use a very precise digital scale as I am a bit OCD and find it relatively easy to get the VTF precisely set.

CJ

I think you answered the question yourself. The problem is that one needs to utilize a precise digital scale with the Ekos to get VTF accuracy. How many dealers do you think do that?

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10 hours ago, Daveyf said:

The problem is that one needs to utilize a precise digital scale with the Ekos to get VTF accuracy. How many dealers do you think do that?

Mine does. And I know better (now :$) than to mess with his settings.

David

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Seems with the later Ekos/SE  (Longer head shell, maybe others)   You need scales at home, as I don't see any other way after transporting the deck how to get the tracking weight accurate. 

To get it home you needed to have removed the counter weight for transport, so now you have to start again the set up when home. 

TBH I'm pretty disappointed with the arm and it's "quality"    The anti skate won't come completely off, so you can't static balance the arm, making tracking weight setting impossible without scales.  I preset the TF dial to what I want then with scales tune the counter weight to match the value on the dial. The actual weight and dial are then all aligned. 

Also the lift lower devise is poor compared to the original Ekos arm,  if you lower the lever too quick the damper sticks in the up position.  The original arm you could lower it fully and let the damping gently lower it for you.  

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1 hour ago, 9designs said:

Also the lift lower device is poor compared to the original Ekos arm,  if you lower the lever too quick the damper sticks in the up position.  The original arm you could lower it fully and let the damping gently lower it for you.  

My Ekos SE/1 behaves differently to the way you describe..  All I need to do is push the lever beyond a "tipping point". Once the stylus is on the record, the lever drops smoothly to the lowered position; you don't have to push it all the way. It might be worth checking with Linn whether your arm is faulty.

In my case, my dealer came on site, so used his scales to check the VTF with the deck installed in its proper position. Incidentally, what make of digital scale do you use? I ought to get one, and they're not expensive, but I'm not familiar with the different brands that are available.

David

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It's been like it from "new", it was an exdem arm from Cymbiosis.   Yes if you go slow enough it will do like you say, too quick with the lever and it will not lower the arm.   The original Ekos on my other deck is simply a better made arm. 

Unbranded scales, off ebay, made in China. When I looked many looked the same whether they were branded or not, so probably all came from the same factory. Has it's own calibration weight, seems to work fine.  

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2 hours ago, 9designs said:

 Yes if you go slow enough it will do like you say, too quick with the lever and it will not lower the arm.   The original Ekos on my other deck is simply a better made arm. 

Even if I move my lever fast enough to produce suspension wobble, my arm lowers. In normal use, I don't have to move the lever particularly slowly; let go as soon as i hear the stylus make contact, and the lever then descends slowly to its lower rest position.

Thanks for the info. on the scales.

David

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5 hours ago, 9designs said:

It's been like it from "new", it was an exdem arm from Cymbiosis. 

So it was not new and could have done with a little tlc before being sold. Simple.

CJ

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The cueing device on newer Ekos arms is designed differently to the old ones.  If you push it down you can push it too far and the cam will interfere with the action of the cueing.  It has always been recommended with this device that you just get it started and let the lever go down by itself.  The reason for this change is that the older cueing device has an actuator that pushed the cam but was not connected to it allowing you to drop the handle and still have the piston drop slowly.  The problem with that is it allowed the handle to rattle.  Because of this a number of people removed their cueing devices, myself included, as it sounded more musical with it off the arm.  The new cueing device addresses this problem and the difference with it removed is minimal.  You just have to learn to use it a bit differently.

As to the Kandid, it is made by Lyra but engineered by Linn so there is no reason for it to have the same family sound of Lyra cartridges.  When Jonathan Carr, the designer of Lyra cartridges, was asked how much of the design of the Akiva was theirs he replied that the Akiva did not share a single part with any Lyra cartridge - it was designed by Linn and made to their specs.  I believe the Kandid is quite similar in sharing few if any parts with Lyra cartridges, obviously the body, mounting and connection to the tonearm cabling are all significantly different.  The Kandid does incorporate the "new angle" system from Lyra but it is otherwise a very different cartridge with its own design and voicing.

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By the way, speaking of the Krystal...it's sourced by Goldring and I think this Goldring Ethos is essentially the Krystal with a different body.  Specs are the same. I wonder if there are internal differences. Knowing the sound of a Goldring, I think this is a "sound" theory.  Fellow Linn people, am I wrong here?  And apologies if this has been pointed out before. 

https://www.goldring.co.uk/goldring-ethos.html#tab0

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1 hour ago, mskaye said:

By the way, speaking of the Krystal...it's sourced by Goldring and I think this Goldring Ethos is essentially the Krystal with a different body.  Specs are the same. I wonder if there are internal differences. Knowing the sound of a Goldring, I think this is a "sound" theory.  Fellow Linn people, am I wrong here?  And apologies if this has been pointed out before. 

https://www.goldring.co.uk/goldring-ethos.html#tab0

So, knowing that the Krystal is Goldring made, and Goldring offer cartridge repair and retipping, can one assume that a worn out Krystal diamond/ cantilever can be replaced by them at full original spec, with little or no difference compared to new ? 

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2 hours ago, arm said:

So, knowing that the Krystal is Goldring made, and Goldring offer cartridge repair and retipping, can one assume that a worn out Krystal diamond/ cantilever can be replaced by them at full original spec, with little or no difference compared to new ? 

I think the answer would be yes.  https://www.goldring.co.uk/goldring-cartridge-repair-refurbishment

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4 minutes ago, mskaye said:

Sounds too good to be true with minimum charge £300 and I could assume about £400-500 max for re-tipping based on my experience with ESC working on my old Troika several years ago. Surely someone with a Krystal has tried at this point ? 

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59 minutes ago, arm said:

Sounds too good to be true with minimum charge £300 and I could assume about £400-500 max for re-tipping based on my experience with ESC working on my old Troika several years ago. Surely someone with a Krystal has tried at this point ? 

Not too good to be true. Goldring is a small operation as is Soundsmith in the US which does similar high quality re-tips and re-builds - rumored to be improvements over originals.  

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1 hour ago, mskaye said:

Not too good to be true. Goldring is a small operation as is Soundsmith in the US which does similar high quality re-tips and re-builds - rumored to be improvements over originals.  

Soundsmith do indeed do re-tips and re-builds. Unfortunately, IME, the results are not as good as what the original sounds like. Ask anyone who owns a Koetsu for example, whether the re-tip by Soundsmith sounds as great as the re-tip by Koetsu ( albeit, the price for a Koetsu re-build is a lot higher). 

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26 minutes ago, Daveyf said:

Soundsmith do indeed do re-tips and re-builds. Unfortunately, IME, the results are not as good as what the original sounds like. Ask anyone who owns a Koetsu for example, whether the re-tip by Soundsmith sounds as great as the re-tip by Koetsu ( albeit, the price for a Koetsu re-build is a lot higher). 

Good to know. I did say rumored!  You obviously get what you pay for...And yes, the cost of a manufacturer rebuild is usually quite costly. I have read that Soundsmith cartridges - which I have never owned or heard - do offer rebuilds etc. at a much lower cost than most manufacturers.  To some people that's important.   

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