skypickle

What are people using to stream music to their Linn

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I wish Linn would simplify things and allow Their DSM to hook up to a smb share or even allow me plug a usb drive into it. But as it is, I need another piece of software running to 'serve' the music. More power consumption, more points of failure.  So I have a usb drive and I think I'll just install minim server onto a pi and use that.

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QNAP HS251here too, but using minim server and controlled using Kazoo on an iPad. Also problem-free for several years (once I’d worked out I needed to instruct my router to give the NAS a fixed IP address)!

Ian

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The Internet

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I am really suprised that people are still buying NAS drives these days. We have a Dell Power Edge Server for our business and use that to store our ripped music (last ripped a CD in 2016). I never consciously pick the ripped CD to play using Roon. We use Tidal pretty much exclusively. For the occasional blast of nostalgia we play records from our youth on our LP12.

CJ

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As some of my music is not available on neither Tidal of Qobuz I opted for a NAS a couple of months ago. I'm quite happy with it. 

Here are my thoughts about NAS and ripping or downloading vs streaming:

  • CD's are quite cheap on the S/H market, buying gives you also something to own. 
  • It narrows your choice, you already know what you like since you already have it in your library
  • Streaming service is still a subscription and not a cheap one. most importantly for me, you will never own it. 

@skypickle I had a cambridge streamer before the DSM, it worked with USB drives, but is not te same look and feel as the server option.  Every time you started the thing up it needed to load the USB. If I now launch the NAS it is up and running in a couple of seconds. 

my 2 cents. 

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Posted (edited)
38 minutes ago, Pennypacker said:
  • CD's are quite cheap on the S/H market, buying gives you also something to own. 
  • It narrows your choice, you already know what you like since you already have it in your library
  • Streaming service is still a subscription and not a cheap one. most importantly for me, you will never own it. 

Haha, these comments ring true with me too. Maybe most people here can relate in a similar way?

I think it's an age thing. My teenage daughter would never consider buying a CD or DVD. Why do that when it's available to stream?

I would be interested in what the age demographic of a hifi forum actually is. I'd bet pretty much all over 40 years of age and perhaps an average of maybe 55-60? Obviously that's a wild guess on my part. (I wish I knew how to make up one of those quick tick box online surveys you often see!) Incidentally I fit snuggly into the latter group. :)

However, I think the streaming services are actually very cheap compared to what we used to spend on new CD's from Tower Records, HMV and Virgin. Now, for as little as £1 per month we have perhaps 70-90% of all the music ever recorded at our fingertips. And often, that monthly subscription caters for the whole families musical needs.

I don't regret spending hours ripping CD's to the NAS, but most of my listening is now streamed via subscription. 

Mike.

Edited by SnapperMike

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There is always another way of looking at things:

  • CD's are quite cheap on the S/H market, buying gives you also something to own. 

Something you have to find storage for in your house

  • It narrows your choice, you already know what you like since you already have it in your library

It narrows your music appreciation as you will never stumble on something new that you like

  • Streaming service is still a subscription and not a cheap one. most importantly for me, you will never own it. 

Why own it when it will be worthless in 10 years. A Tidal subscription is much, much cheaper than a NAS drive with a couple of large hard drives.

No need to rip cds, no tearing hair out over dodgy metadata, no awkward back-up process, no extra box in the house, no learning curve in how to operate, no complicated software updates

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I wonder if climate change will alter the view of younger listeners. I seem to remember reading a column in one of the hifi magazines a few months ago (Hifi News?) that said, based on current technology, streaming a song more than 35 times had a greater carbon footprint than if you had played a local copy (because the server farm the data was sitting on needed to be air conditioned, and the data then transmitted over networks that themselves demanded power/cooling). I don’t have the source evidence to back that up though so it may not be true. And the technology is improving all the time so the number of plays may increase before the balance is tilted in favour of a local copy. 
 

If the basic argument is true though, then I assume a download would be more planet friendly than a new CD or vinyl LP, but that secondhand CDs or vinyl would be best of all. If kids are prepared to change what they drive or eat based on advice, perhaps they’ll also change to use streaming to discover new music, but then buy a copy (on whatever medium works for them)? Probably still store it on their phones though, backed up to the cloud so not saying they’ll be buying NAS.

Ian

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CJ's 'for and against' points are all good. For most of us, I suspect, what works best is determined by our mood at the time, how much audio quality actually matters during normal, relaxed listening, and how 'disposable' we feel the music we are listening to actually is. For instance, I watch TV for undemanding diversion. I have never recorded programmes except for catch up purposes, and, with the catch up services now available on my TV, have pretty much stopped making any recordings. My viewing consists mainly of what is available on the catch up services; for me, TV programmes are entirely disposable.

Music is different. Music was, in a number of ways, an essential part of my upbringing, and it has always been an important part of bringing together things that are intellectually, culturally, emotionally and, yes, spiritually important to me. The process of rediscovery associated with listening again to a work or recording I have not heard for some time can be even more satisfying than getting to grips with something new and unfamiliar. I have a Spotify subscription that allows me to explore the unfamiliar (and dispose of things I don't engage with), but enjoying the music collection I have built up over the years, with its juxtaposition of familiarity and new discovery, is like wandering through my garden and seeing plants flowering that I didn't even know were there.

David

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QNAP TS-251 for ripped CDs and Hi-Res downloads. Tune-in Radio for channels [quite fond of WQXR Public Radio from NYC: classical]. Tidal for music my dear partner likes to hear, and friends who come over. Being a mostly classical and jazz guy, and the rock music I listened to in my youth was mostly the rebellious type [Bowie, Velvets, Doors, NYDolls, Eno, Ayers, Clash, Marley (when he came on the scene), etc) so few friends left from that area of music, Tidal is available for others, mostly. Having said that, it does have a lot of great jazz, and a fairly good classical catalogue, you just have to learn how to navigate it: much is well hidden, so you need to know what you want, rather than being able to properly browse to find.

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Posted (edited)

I have a QNAP 251+ with 2 X 4TB Western Digital Reds configured to create more than 7 TB of memory.

On my NAS, I have a selection of 16-44, 24-88, 24-96, 24-176 and 24-192 music, as well as a collection of 24-96 5.1 music streaming through my OPPO to stream in 5.1, ripped from my DVD-Audio collection.

I am streaming my music from the QNAP to  a Bonn H8 Silent Angel switch, and then to my AEDSM. My whole network is Cat8.

I find the sound quality of music from my NAS, significantly better than through Tidal.

Tidal drops out, has inconsistent timing issues and sounds like lower resolution to me.I have also found that trying to set up Space Optimisation using Tidal or Qobuz is very inconsistent and I would definitely recommend streaming from a NAS when setting up SO.

I do stream  Internet radio, such as Radio Paradise and Groovy Reflections 

Edited by Paulssurround

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It’s obvious that most of you have good internet access. Here, i have comcast and my tidal HQ subscription was always dropping out due to bandwidth issues. So I prefer to use a small hd -4 terabytes - and this allows me to load up music from a pc and not have a pc running 24x7. Having a NAS with scheduled start up and shutdown is an attractive option.

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Posted (edited)

This is what I am using for streaming music to my Linn Majik DSM:

- Streaming service: Tidal subscription
- locally stored music: abt 80.000 songs stored on Synology NAS (DS218+), most of them own ripped CD and Vinyl collection, ripped with DBPoweramp (CD) respectively VinylStudio (Vinyl)

- Roon Subscription with..
- Roon Core: Cirrus Nimbini 2.5 (a fanless NUC ordered at Cirrus7, Germany)
- Roon End Point: Usually my iPad
- Ethernet connection (Nimbini, Linn Majik, NAS)

What is important for me when streaming music?

1 OFFLINE ACCESS TO MY PREFERRED MUSIC

Although I really enjoy my Tidal subscription I still buy physical media (CD or vinyl) or at least downloads of the music I really hate the idea of not "possessing" music as I want to be able to have access to "my" music even in case my streaminfg service will go bust, I don't have access to the internet etc..

2 EASY SETUP

I don't like spending hours in tagging my ripped music finding covers etc.: dbPoweramp and Vinylstudio are fantastic tools in this repect
Same applies to the hardware: The Linn Majik DSM is really easy to handle. The Cirrus Nimbini is absolutely incredible in this respect: It came with a preinstalled (by Cirrus7) Roon OS and I virtually only had to connect it with the power- and ethernet cable and to set the Nimbini as Core via the web interface on my iPad. It took not more than abt 3 hours to scan all 80.000 songs.

3 EASY LISTENING

Roon is a fantastic software and using my iPad (or sometimes my Macbook or iMac) as Roon endpoint is great fun.

Jens

This is my Fanless Cirrus7 NUC

1.jpeg

Edited by JensA

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