JANDL100

Random astronomy things

Recommended Posts

Various astronomy threads seem to have come and gone on the Wam over the years, with none very active atm as far as I can see.

I know there are quite a few folks who are interested in the subject, so I thought I'd start a new thread about whatever astronomy-related things you want to share.

I'll kick off with a recent 'video sequence' taken by a probe on its way to the planet Mercury.
It was launched in 2018 and is following a complex path, including multiple planetary flybys, and will arrive Mercury 2025.

Anyway, it's just completed a flyby of our very own planet Earth, and this amazing vid sequence has been put together of the view it had as it passed us by.

A sequence of images captured by one of the selfie cameras on BepiColombo shortly before the closest approach.

https://www.esa.int/Science_Exploration/Space_Science/BepiColombo/BepiColombo_takes_last_snaps_of_Earth_en_route_to_Mercury

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another video sequence, even more jaw dropping imo.

The Rosetta spacecraft mission to the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67p), which completed in 2016 with a landing on the surface.

400,000 individual images were taken and a clever clogs has put together an amazing video sequence from them.

Watch - and then gather up your jaw from the floor. :o

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some more info on the above comet encounter ...

"In 2016 an exciting mission was ended.
The Rosetta spacecraft made its final manouver. A controlled hard-landing on the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67p).
Before that Rosetta accompanied the Comet for more then 2 years. It researched valuable scientific data, brought a lander on to the comets surface and took a vast number of pictures.

2017 Esa released over 400000 images from Rosettas comet mission.
Based on these material Motion Designer Christian Stangl and Composer Wolfgang Stangl worked together to create this shortfilm.
The sequences are digitally enhanced real-footage from the probe.

Watch the beauty of an active alien body, far out in the dephts of our solar system.

Read a detailed description of the Rosetta Mission
esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Rosetta/Europe_s_comet_chaser "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Super Wammer

Thanks Jerry I enjoyed that.:^

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one of the most amazing galaxy collisions - it looks like the centre galaxy has smashed right through the other, causing an expanding ring of stars formed by the shock wave from the collision.  Billions of stars, just smasheroo!

Probably best observed from a distance rather than being in one of the galaxies! :P

When Galaxies Collide

https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_2085.html

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moderator
Posted (edited)

Let me add an image I took a few days ago using a 127mm refractor from my back garden near Reading:

NGC_4565_colour_small.thumb.jpg.a750ca026fe81e754c3dfd3ffdb1d522.jpg

Can you spot the smaller galaxies?

 

Edited by George 47
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's amazing, George.

So much detail of the spiral pattern and dust lanes, despite the galaxy being almost edge-on.
Who needs the Hubble Space Telescope? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The biggest spiral galaxy in our part of the universe, it's 232 million light years away from us and way outside our own Local Group of galaxies which is dominated by the Andromeda Galaxy and our own Milky Way.   UGC 2885 has about 1 trillion stars [a million million], 10 times as many stars and is 2.5 times wider than the Milky Way galaxy. - it's a bit of a mystery how it grew so large, perhaps multiple mergers with other galaxies in the distant past.  The Milky Way is considered a large spiral galaxy, but it's dwarfed by this one.

STSCI-H-p2001a-m-2000x1500.png

https://astronomynow.com/2020/01/06/godzilla-galaxy-one-of-largest-observed-hosts-a-trillion-suns/

Edited by JANDL100
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

One of my favourite photos from the Curiosity Rover currently pottering about on Mars.

It's part way up Mount Sharp, which is the central peak within the large Gale Crater which was created billions of years ago by the impact of a very large meteorite.

In the foreground you can see the rocky terrain around the rover, sloping up toward the peak, and in the misty distance a section of the walls of the crater about 75km away.
Just look at the size of the crater wall.  Wow.
To me it's as if I'm standing there myself, amazing.

https://www.sciencealert.com/this-is-curiosity-s-view-as-it-bravely-toils-on-lonely-mars?fbclid=IwAR3RT6-zpb3mkGxNTK3k0jeBb6oHRByvGxByQNRi17TFx6S5fmJ64kMNJh0

gale-crater-nov-2019_1024.jpg

Edited by JANDL100
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Super Wammer
On 11/04/2020 at 10:05, George 47 said:

Let me add an image I took a few days ago using a 127mm refractor from my back garden near Reading:

NGC_4565_colour_small.thumb.jpg.a750ca026fe81e754c3dfd3ffdb1d522.jpg

Can you spot the smaller galaxies?

 

Due to our recent move I've not had a chance to set up my telescope yet...undecided where to put it yet..

Kindest regards Julian 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

What with the virus lockdown, maybe now is the time to start an active interest in astronomy ....

Here's what to see in the night sky while you're stuck at home

While everyone is staying safe and doing what they can to cope with the coronavirus pandemic, we at Space.com have a list of astronomy activities you can do from your own backyard or balcony. All you need is your own eyes, a bit of time and a spot to stand outdoors, even just beside your living quarters. We hope this will help you find activities to do while waiting out the quarantine.....

https://www.space.com/night-sky-observing-from-home-guide.html

Edited by JANDL100

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'New images reveal fine threads of million-degree plasma woven throughout the Sun's atmosphere'

'The ultra-sharp images were taken by NASA's High-Resolution Coronal Imager (or Hi-C for short), a unique astronomical telescope carried into space on a sub-orbital rocket flight. The telescope can pick out structures in the Sun's atmosphere as small as 70km in size, or around 0.01% the size of the Sun, making these the highest resolution images ever taken of the Sun's atmosphere.'

There's a good, short vid on the link showing even more detail - https://phys.org/news/2020-04-images-reveal-fine-threads-million-degree.html?utm_source=nwletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=weekly-nwletter

'The exact physical mechanism that is creating these pervasive hot strands remains unclear, so scientific debate will now focus on why they are formed, and how their presence helps us understand the eruption of solar flares and solar storms that could affect life on Earth.'

New images reveal fine threads of million-degree plasma woven throughout the Sun's atmosphere

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moderator

sgr_lg.thumb.jpg.7f7e652b06ddf277c19cae60942d8ec4.jpg

The center of our Milky Way galaxy has a  supermassive black hole called Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), located in the middle. It is revealed in these images. 
The large image contains X-rays from Chandra in blue and infrared emission from the Hubble Space Telescope in red and yellow. The inset shows a close-up view of Sgr A* in X-rays only, covering a region half a light year wide. The diffuse X-ray emission is from hot gas captured by the black hole and being pulled inwards.

This supermassive black hole is 4 million times the mass of the Sun

SupermassiveBlackHoleBinary.thumb.jpg.e945eff37d17da72bb2edb0ea982ced1.jpg

This image is of a galaxy that has absorbed a previous galaxy and the result is two supermassive black holes in the centre.

Each black hole’s mass is more than 800 million times that of our sun. As the two gradually draw closer together in a death spiral, they will begin sending gravitational waves rippling through space-time. Those cosmic ripples will join the as-yet-undetected background noise of gravitational waves from other supermassive black holes. Even before the destined collision, the gravitational waves emanating from the supermassive black hole pair will dwarf those previously detected from the mergers of much smaller black holes and neutron stars.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Astrophysicists in punch up over dark matter study results! :fight::clout:

"That’s the crux of the argument: the new paper suggests others picked up on background noise instead of the x-ray signal, and those others say the new paper happened to miss the real signal itself."
https://futurism.com/the-byte/research-doesnt-find-dark-matter-milky-way?mc_cid=83509432be&utm_term=0_03cd0a26cd-83509432be-246888077&utm_medium=email&mc_eid=092f9d027b&utm_source=The Future Is&utm_campaign=83509432be-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_04_13_09_04

What the hell is Dark Matter*?  Something, and there must be a hell of a lot of it, is keeping galaxies from flying apart due to how fast they are spinning - but it can't be directly seen at all. :?
Nobody knows for sure what it is, or even if it definitely exists, but there are lots of guesses, investigations and heated arguments. :) 

Scientific research at its most fundamental. :geek:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_matter

Edited by JANDL100

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moderator
Posted (edited)

And don't ask about Dark Energy. We know four facts about it and that is IT. And it accounts for about 75% of the universe.

From last night, NGC 4631 or as it has been nicknamed The Whale Galaxy:

93509613_NGC4631_LRGB.jpg.6259d9d4fd4bd48eff9a7cced0fc345b.jpg

And if you think it looks weird, NGC 4631 contains a central starburst, which is a region of intense star formation. The strong star formation is evident in the emission from ionized hydrogen and interstellar dust heated by the stars formed in the starburst. The most massive stars that form in star formation regions only burn hydrogen gas through fusion for a short period of time, after which they explode as supernovae. So many supernovae have exploded in the center of NGC 4631 that they are blowing gas out of the plane of the galaxy. This superwind can be seen in X-rays and in spectral line emission. The gas from this superwind has produced a giant, diffuse corona of hot, X-ray emitting gas around the whole galaxy.

Edited by George 47
  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.