JANDL100

Random astronomy things

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^They don't want to pay for the excess baggage and are ashamed to say :cool:

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More interesting asteroid/comet insights.
This time from a(nother?) bodged Lander mission.
A couple of years back the Philae probe crash landed on the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.


www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-03043-4

Recently published detailed analysis of the crash site shows that "Philae touched the surface at four points over two minutes: it slid down a slope, cartwheeled through a crevice and hit a boulder, then bounced on its head before departing for its resting place. The third impact was the most revealing. The top of the craft made a 25-centimetre-deep imprint in boulder ice."

Woof!! What a cockup.

But, the aforementioned detailed analysis of the multiple crash impacts has allowed a lot of new discoveries about the surface to be made.
Apparently, the comet doesn't have a solid surface at all, it's more like cappuccino froth, even fluffier than recently fallen snow.
Which may also explain why the plan to fire a harpoon into the surface to anchor the probe failed to work.

So, learning a lot, even from apparently disastrous failures!

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"How many habitable planets are out there?

Recent research has estimated that there could be as many as 300 million potentially habitable planets in our galaxy. Some could even be pretty close, with several likely within 30 light-years of our Sun."

For the first time this research takes into account observations from both the Kepler and Gaia orbiting telescopes. Kepler looking specifically for Exoplanets and Gaia observing the positions and movement of millions of stars in our galaxy.

phys.org/news/2020-10-habitable-planets.html

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"NASA's Leaking Asteroid Sample Is Finally Secure! Now to Get It Back to Earth" 

https://www.sciencealert.com/nasa-secured-the-precious-asteroid-sample-320-million-km-away-and-it-s-coming-home

Edited by JANDL100

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Dark matter found?

This would be a tad embarrassing if it's correct.
The multi-billions spent in the hunt for exotic dark matter particles... when actually dark matter is merely a non-interacting state of the ever so normal hydrogen atom?
Whoops. 

Interesting article, but I am way underpowered to know if there are strong counter arguments. I shall have a look round. 

https://sciencex.com/news/2020-10-dark-hypothetical-undiscovered-particles-physical.html

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Hmmm....

He is unhappy with people using new sub-atomic particles to explain dark matter so uses a new 'flavour' of hydrogen atoms to account for most of the dark matter. The exsistence of this flavour is an idea and possibly, some small quantities have been found. But he now wants acceptance of its exsistence for 25% of the mass of universe. I am not sure if anyone is 'looking' for this material but if it accounts for a large proportion of 25% of the mass of the universe then it would be easier to detect. I appreciate its interactions are minimal but we have detected weakly interacting particles such as neutrinos, which can go through half the earth without any difficulty. It maybe because his idea has not got great acceptance that people may be a bit reluctant to spend large amounts of instrument time looking for it. I can't remember how many ideas there are for dark matter but it is a lot although recently it has been thinning out a bit with warm dark matter becoming a slight favourite. Interesting article though.

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An asteroid called Apophis - maybe it's the next major impactor on Earth, in 2068.

And its orbit is changing unpredictably due to pressure from sunlight. 

Interesting article here with a good animation showing how its orbit intersects with the Earth's for the 2029 encounter. 

https://earthsky.org/space/asteroid-99942-apophis-encounters-2029-2036-2068

Edited by JANDL100
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Here's an impressive mind boggle.


... Two black holes each weighing around 85 and 66 times the mass of the Sun, collided to form a larger black hole weighing 142 times the mass of the Sun.
Something strange is happening to simple addition arithmetic here ... the remaining deficit, totalling 9 solar masses, was released as gravitational wave energy, making it the most energetic event in the universe that we’ve ever detected.

So 9 solar masses was converted to pure energy in this merger. Phweesh.

astrobites.org/2020/11/03/bh-escape-speed/

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Here's an extreme exoplanet.

K2-141b, an Earth-size exoplanet with a surface, ocean, and atmosphere all made up of the same ingredients: rocks.
.. . featuring the evaporation and precipitation of rocks, supersonic winds that rage over 5000 km/hr, and a magma ocean 100 km deep.
The night side experiences frigid temperatures of below -200 C. The day side of the exoplanet, at an estimated 3000 C, is hot enough to not only melt rocks but vaporize them as well

It would be an interesting place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there.

phys.org/news/2020-11-supersonic-rocky-lava-planet.html

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Tree rings may hold information about nearby supernovae and their impact on Earth. 

https://phys.org/news/2020-11-tree-clues-impacts-distant-supernovas.html

"the eight closest supernovas studied, all seemed to be associated with unexplained spikes in the radiocarbon record on Earth."

Edited by JANDL100

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That is interesting also because radiocarbon dating assumes a constant level of C-14.  If this level has fluctuated as they suggest then it would call many radiocarbon dates into question.

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flames_1024.jpg

New Radio Images Show Galaxies Like Flames Burning in The Dark

The Perseus galaxy cluster is huge, one of the most massive objects in the known Universe. It contains thousands of galaxies enveloped in a huge cloud of hot gas. And the new VLA images - the first in high resolution in the low-frequency 230 to 470 mergahertz range - reveal previously unseen details in the large-scale radio structures.

https://www.sciencealert.com/new-radio-images-show-galaxies-like-flames-burning-in-the-dark

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