Sign in to follow this  
kernow

Speaker recap

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Just wondering, what age would you consider doing this, if at all when there is no sonic degradation? 

I think my tannoys are coming up to 20+ years old, and it's not a tricky thing to do obviously. 

I guess a visual inspection might be worth it, but they might not be swelling or whatever. 

Cheers x

Edited by kernow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No degradation, no reason to mess about.

If you want to then go carefully, modern decent quality capacitors - teflon films and the like - do not have very similar characteristics to the mostly electrolytic originals used in Tannoys (even compared to when they were new), things like Q,D, ESD are not the same even if the capacitance is, so you risk changing the sound unless you take this into account. That's to leave aside batching and component selection. If the components used are 5% or 20-50% rated it doesn't mean that they were chosen solely on that specification, they could have been sufficiently cheap that the company bought in 50% tolerance components and selected out at 10% as cheaper than buying in 10% components.

My experiences with Tannoy crossovers suggested to me that the switches are worth attention, the miserable soldering and internal wiring is worthy of improvement, but the actual components themselves seemed to have remained solid. Others may have different experiences of course.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently removed all of the capacitors in my 1980’s Tannoys to resolder all of the component connections and whilst doing so I measured each capacitor and they were all still within 5% tolerance from new .


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are curious enough and have time on your hands, you can go on Amazon and get a digital LCR meter for £20 which will measure capacitance, inductance and resistance.

If you get really bored, you can start removing the caps and inductors from your speakers and measure them. You may find some caps have indeed degraded, especially if any are electrolytics. Film caps less likely to have degraded.

Either way, some expert audio engineers - including Doug Self -  will tell you that polyester caps distort, whereas polyprop caps do not. So if you're still in self-isolation, are very bored and have found any polyester caps in your speakers, you can perhaps replace these with polyrops -  your call!

The possibilities are endless and let's face it, times are hard and a man needs a hobby!

:-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve been looking into replacing capacitors on an old pair of Sansui SP 2500x speakers from the 70,s.

I acquired them from a regular customer that I used to do work for & now they’ve since emigrated.

 They’ve been in storage a good few years  but now with a bit more time on my hands I thought it’s something I can now take a look at .

I’ve had them connected at home and they working fine but it would be nice to get the caps replaced.Hoping to get them tidied up & use them in a separate room as a retro system set up eventually.

Not sure where’s the best to purchase from ?

 I’ve had a scout around on the net but I’m finding it difficult to obtain caps with the corresponding measurements to the originals.

Any help or advice out there would be appreciated (see pics)

thanks

5621E669-CA3C-4C2F-B8DE-F13D922B4638.jpeg

ABCE49BD-9423-4572-A9EE-ED2B704B1E22.jpeg

22426E61-DEC7-4B46-A574-B4AB81DE9738.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been a bit sceptical about re-caping speakers, but one of my (4) Wharfedale Teesdale sp2 was sounding a bit odd, difficult to put a convenient descriptive word on the sound. A distortion plot in ARTA showed this:

teasdale distort.PNG

Sounded much better with after decent budget recap!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moderator
Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Cygnusx1 said:

I’ve been looking into replacing capacitors on an old pair of Sansui SP 2500x speakers from the 70,s.

I acquired them from a regular customer that I used to do work for & now they’ve since emigrated.

 They’ve been in storage a good few years  but now with a bit more time on my hands I thought it’s something I can now take a look at .

I’ve had them connected at home and they working fine but it would be nice to get the caps replaced.Hoping to get them tidied up & use them in a separate room as a retro system set up eventually.

Not sure where’s the best to purchase from ?

 I’ve had a scout around on the net but I’m finding it difficult to obtain caps with the corresponding measurements to the originals.

Any help or advice out there would be appreciated (see pics)

thanks

5621E669-CA3C-4C2F-B8DE-F13D922B4638.jpeg

ABCE49BD-9423-4572-A9EE-ED2B704B1E22.jpeg

22426E61-DEC7-4B46-A574-B4AB81DE9738.jpeg

If you replace the electrolytics, you absolutely must use bipolar varieties. Cricklewood carry stocks of most of the values you need: https://www.cricklewoodelectronics.com/ALCAP-Bipolar-Axial-Audio-Electrolytics-50V-and-100V-for-Crossovers-etc..html

Alternatively, you could use Ansar polys, which appear in a number of decent crossovers: https://www.cricklewoodelectronics.com/ANSAR-SUPERSOUND-Polypropylene-Audio-Capacitors-Axial.html

Either way, bear in mind that you can (if you have enough space) parallel capacitors to get to the correct value. It's the opposite of the formula for resistors, in that parallel capacitors equate to the total of the individual values. So for example if you need 22uF, you can parallel 20uF and two 1uF.

Edited by rabski
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve been looking into replacing capacitors on an old pair of Sansui SP 2500x speakers from the 70,s.

I acquired them from a regular customer that I used to do work for & now they’ve since emigrated.

 They’ve been in storage a good few years  but now with a bit more time on my hands I thought it’s something I can now take a look at .

I’ve had them connected at home and they working fine but it would be nice to get the caps replaced.Hoping to get them tidied up & use them in a separate room as a retro system set up eventually.

Not sure where’s the best to purchase from ?

 I’ve had a scout around on the net but I’m finding it difficult to obtain caps with the corresponding measurements to the originals.

Any help or advice out there would be appreciated (see pics)

thanks.

thanks  for the links, advice & information ,I’ve placed an order today with Crickelwoodelectronics.

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moderator
Posted (edited)

Better? not really for crossover use. You'll most likely need wirewound 'coffin' ones, which are as good now as they have always been. The only issue is that wirewounds do tend to drift in value a bit. At least, some do. It's worth desoldering them and checking with a meter (you'll need to desolder one end, as the rest of the circuit will affect the measurement otherwise). If they're within 10% of the stated value, I'd leave them alone.

Technology has improved with the availability of specific thin-film metal types for signal circuits, where noise can differ, but not crossovers, where you need much higher wattage ratings.

Edited by rabski

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.