Non-Smoking Man

Intermittent fasting diet

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Bazzer said:

Champagne and cigars for Lester , very tall wasn't he Jack for a flat racing jockey ?

Quite right Bazzer - nicknamed 'The Long Fellow', Lester was 5 8" and used to ride at around 8 stone 7 llbs my then girlfriend's weight. Of course a lot of them probably skipped breakfast - so there was their 16 hours off and 8 hours on.

Joe Mercer was born on 25th October 1934, began his riding career in 1947, and rode a total of 2810 winners. He retired from raceriding in 1985. He is still alive today.

5 times champion jockey Doug Smith lived for 72 years.

Said to 'posess rare strength in a finish' jockey Jimmy Lindley was born on May 16th 1935 and is still alive today. Jimmy was forced to ride over hurdles for a time due to weight problems and gave up his battlle with the scales to join the BBC commentary team - a path popular today. Lindley was of relatively normal propportions for a jockey.

Many jockeys retired from riding and became trainers - the Easterbys from Yorkshire are examples. Mick Easterby was born in 1931 and can still hold a conversation and train a racehorse: two things to note there - longevity and still got his wits about him.

Jack

Edited by Non-Smoking Man
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... But did they enjoy themselves? 

There's no point living to 108 and being miserable. ;)

I'd rather live to 78 and enjoy my food. And I say that at the age of 64 with 78 not seeming to be that far off!

Having said that, I have successfully lost weight by intermittent fasting and intend to maintain a fairly healthy weight by continuing to do so. 

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Posted (edited)
On 07/06/2020 at 08:46, JANDL100 said:

... But did they enjoy themselves? 

There's no point living to 108 and being miserable. ;)

I'd rather live to 78 and enjoy my food. And I say that at the age of 64 with 78 not seeming to be that far off!

Having said that, I have successfully lost weight by intermittent fasting and intend to maintain a fairly healthy weight by continuing to do so. 

These are top jockeys I'm referring to - these people and others in  the racing world live for the sport. The equation for them is not a balance of enjoyment and misery as if those two words encompass all that can be said about the matter. (I know you are being knowingly flippant here...but I only do 'serious' - its a Forum failing of mine.)

Admittedlly its the successfull jocks I've given as examples - I'm sure the less successful ones must have thought the sacrifice of not eating tough. However, if you read my resume of the Horizon proramme you will see that fasters , after a while, need less food when 'let loose' on an eating day. I have found this also. Any discomfort I may have I can offset against the gains - longer healthier life and more years to enjoy my daughter and support her rather than  being a sick burden.

Its been 1 month today and I have just got off the scales at 14 stone 12lbs - a loss of 9lbs. I'm pretty satisfied with that. I stuck to the minimum of 16 hours fasting per day.

Next report in 1 month.

Jack NSM

Edited by Non-Smoking Man

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In all honesty, the only "diet " that ever worked for me was exercise - now that it is relatively easy to convert power out put (on a bicyle) to wattage and to then leave a small wattage deficit every day.

It is not difficult. It is easy to calculate plus it gives you an aerobic workout at the same time. It is simple biology.

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One thing to bear in mind is that the body uses more energy to process a meal eaten early in the day than the same one consumed later. So just shifting all your meals a bit early and keeping them closer together results in weight loss, regardless of any other factors. It’s better to eat a good-sized breakfast within an hour of rising, then a moderate-sized lunch a few hours later, then a light meal in the early evening than waiting several hours to start eating later in the day. This ensures at least 15 hours of fasting and is more in tune with our hormones. Studies on the Seventh Day Adventists community in the USA show this is very effective for weight control and has other health benefits. Worth a look. 

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26 minutes ago, Tune said:

In all honesty, the only "diet " that ever worked for me was exercise - now that it is relatively easy to convert power out put (on a bicyle) to wattage and to then leave a small wattage deficit every day.

It is not difficult. It is easy to calculate plus it gives you an aerobic workout at the same time. It is simple biology.

That’s generally not the case. Exercise doesn’t use many calories. Eg. most people’s weekly gym workout session adds up to the same calories as the doughnut they reward themselves afterwards! :D

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18 minutes ago, Nagraboy said:

That’s generally not the case. Exercise doesn’t use many calories. Eg. most people’s weekly gym workout session adds up to the same calories as the doughnut they reward themselves afterwards! :D

I find exercise does reduce weight, increased metabolism? I don't go to a gym, I do cycling and play some sport. If I put on weight I just out some food. I'm about the same weight as I was 40 years ago. Never done fasting and don't intend to either. 

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2 minutes ago, BeeRay said:

I find exercise does reduce weight, increased metabolism? I don't go to a gym, I do cycling and play some sport. If I put on weight I just out some food. I'm about the same weight as I was 40 years ago. Never done fasting and don't intend to either. 

If the exercise reduces weight, why do you need to cut food if you put on weight? That’s kind of my point - the diet is more effective than the exercise. Of course exercise has some effect from calorie burning and metabolic changes but it’s much less important than the diet. A case in point is that there was a study that showed that regular marathon runners who ate a relatively poor diet had higher BMI than vegans who did no exercise.

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, Nagraboy said:

If the exercise reduces weight, why do you need to cut food if you put on weight? That’s kind of my point - the diet is more effective than the exercise. Of course exercise has some effect from calorie burning and metabolic changes but it’s much less important than the diet. A case in point is that there was a study that showed that regular marathon runners who ate a relatively poor diet had higher BMI than vegans who did no exercise.

When I'm not doing any exercise I tend to put on weight. Sport is in the summer. Cycling I don't do all the time. If I played sport and did cycling I would not  put on weight. I put on weight when sitting around in winter. Well don't have a bad diet then. Vegans, I'm not surprised. Eat sensibly and do exercise.

Edited by BeeRay
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Posted (edited)
54 minutes ago, Nagraboy said:

That’s generally not the case. Exercise doesn’t use many calories. Eg. most people’s weekly gym workout session adds up to the same calories as the doughnut they reward themselves afterwards! :D

You'll typically burn 500-600 calories a hour on a bike as opposed to 150 sitting on you ass. There's about 7 times that in a pound of fat.

Do the maths. :) 

Safe and sustainable. Not quick but it stays off.

Edited by Tune

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28 minutes ago, Tune said:

You'll typically burn 500-600 calories a hour on a bike as opposed to 150 sitting on you ass. There's about 7 times that in a pound of fat.

Do the maths. :) 

Safe and sustainable. Not quick but it stays off.

A whole hour of intense exercise for only 5-600 calories burnt. Most people won’t manage that level of exercise in a week. Yet if they just ate slightly less each day (ie one slice of bread a day less!)  they’d achieve the same calorie deficit. There’s really no argument here - It’s not my opinion, it’s a well known fact that diet changes lead to more weight loss than exercise. There are other benefits to exercise of course - eg. CV health and mood - but we’re talking about out weight loss here. 

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I know two big ;-) guys who guy out cycling for hours several times a week and they really push hard , they have been doing it for years and they are still big guys .

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Posted (edited)

^ That's my experience, too, Bazz.  I get a lot of exercise walking/hiking but the only thing that seems to shift the weight for me is calorie intake reduction.

Edited by JANDL100
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Personally, I’ve cut down on the protein and fat a lot and eat about 80% carbs the last 6 years, plus lots of beans and legumes with my vegan diet. At my age (40) there’s no need for large amounts of protein as funnily enough I’m not growing anymore, and fat is the most calorie dense thing so takes more calories to feel full. The fixation you often see with getting protein is mad. Protein is for growth and the time when a human needs the most protein is when they are an infant, yet human breast milk contains about 5% protein! So don’t worry about it.

One of the many good things about eating chickpeas, beans other things like that is when eaten at one meal, any food eaten at the next meal causes less of an insulin spike - even if the gap is evening meal to breakfast. Other things like eating berries at the same time as more unhealthy foods leads to less adverse reactions in the body. I always try to eat something healthy with anything unhealthy.

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Posted (edited)

Are we not the only mammals that continue drinking milk after we are weaned (if that is the correct term ) ?

Actually that's a stupid comment , other mammals haven't got access to it .

Edited by Bazzer

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