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PhotoMax

Play the first digital (popular) recording ever and report back!

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I love Ry Cooder. He has had a great all over the map career.

But did you know Ry recorded the very first all digital album in popular music history?

Check out this report: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bop_till_You_Drop

I urge you to then play Bop Till You Drop (Tidal or Qobuz) on your Linn system and report back. How does it sound? I am on Orcas streaming this via a Majik DSM into Pass Labs pre and amp gear and D9 speakers. It sounds wonderful...

Edited by PhotoMax
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How's the finger?

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You should be hearing an echo from the direction of Point Roberts. Very nice sounding album. I've been enjoying Qobuz all day. This was a nice ending to a long listening session. Moving on to vinyl now.

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Just listened to it on Qobuz.

Interesting! I thought that Brothers in Arms was the first popular album digitally recorded.

It could be interesting to compare the first vinyl release:

https://www.discogs.com/Ry-Cooder-Bop-Till-You-Drop/release/1436845

I prefer Paradise & Lunch though.

M.

Edited by Matteo

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6 hours ago, Matteo said:

Interesting! I thought that Brothers in Arms was the first popular album digitally recorded.

I thought the same. When it came out, I recall seeing "DDD" on the package. Was impressed at the time.

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As usual somebody on the internet has been here before. There are possibilities of 1971 (only three tracks), 1972 (Classical), and 1978(Jazz) -  (depending on definition). You could argue that 1978 is a "commercially released popular album" - Archie Stepp ?

https://prince.org/msg/8/385075

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Also Dylan's Infidels (1983) was digitally recorded.

This album was produced by Mark Knopfler and engineered by Neil Dorsfman (as Brothers in Arms).

M.

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I played this album on CD tonight, having owned it in that format for God knows how many years.  Lovely sound, not at all clinical as you'd probably expect from an early digital recording, and of course it's prime Ry at his best.  One of those albums I've always loved but not played in years - thanks for the nod!

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Had a vinyl copy of Bop Till You Drop together with his next couple since they were first released. Was one of my favorite albums at the time and I still like it.

However, the sound is not the best. For want of a better word, it sounds a little brittle to me. Ry Cooder himself was very disparaging about the sound quality of his early digital recordings.

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That is true! I give him some slack though. Ry has been a leader in recording in so many ways. For such an early digital effort this album still holds up! I have heard far worse recordings done in the modern digital era.
 

Not many people will focus on recordings and sound variances like we do. 
 

Still, it is what it is. For us Linnies it is worth checking out as a historical point/place in time...

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Super Wammer
On 17/09/2020 at 10:53, Matteo said:

Just listened to it on Qobuz.

Interesting! I thought that Brothers in Arms was the first popular album digitally recorded.

It could be interesting to compare the first vinyl release:

https://www.discogs.com/Ry-Cooder-Bop-Till-You-Drop/release/1436845

I prefer Paradise & Lunch though.

M.

Great link,thanks!  I’d always had in mind that Nightfly was one of the first.   I also remember classical LPs with Digital Recording flagged on the sleeve some years before CDs arrived.  

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Just gave Bop till you drop a spin for the first time in years.  The album cover has the blurb about the advantages of digital recording etc.

Have to say it sounds pretty good to me.

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Posted (edited)

Just checked to confirm that I didn't buy a copy of this album. If it was touting Digital, this was probably putting me off, as I own quite a few Ry Cooder albums. Incidentally, I was working with Philips when CD players entered the market. So I took the opportunity to buy a very early Philips CD player on an employees' discount. The sound was very err, embarrassing to my ears. I returned the player next day, assuming some defect. But I learned that it 'worked as designed', and I stayed away from everything 'D' for a couple of years, thereafter.

Edited by TooManyCatweazles
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I’ve had Bop Till You Drop on vinyl from the day it was released and actually bought it because it was the first digitally recorded LP (I also have the first digitally recorded classical LP, which was a Strauss New Year’s Day concert on Decca if IIRC). I’ve always liked it and it sounds just fine on a Klimax  LP12.

I managed to stay away from CDs until ‘92 when I felt the Karik/Numerik was good enough.

’troll

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