wHIZZY

Why is music so important in your life

Recommended Posts

It stops me from wanting to watch TV. 

  • Like 3
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I knew. 

My father was a musician so there was always music and musicians in the house, my mum went to ballet school so she was always dancing and while me and my sisters all had music lessons I never really enjoyed mine, but sitting between the big speakers, with them turned to face each other like massive headphones and hearing a metronome in the background of a Rod Stewart song was the moment that sealed my fate. 

Since then I've always had music playing all day, at home, at work and in the car. 

Excellent question wHIZZY. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mother was a musician, so my love of music is probably hereditary.

It does a number of things for me such as making me feel good and allowing me to explore various emotions, including some darker ones, from the safety of my armchair.

Perhaps, in a way, some of us are music addicts. However, this addicition doesn't lead to people doing bad things so that they can get a fix, satisfy their cravings, and stop the shaking and sweats. Unlike with an addictive drug (so I'm told), a musical "fix" is always a positive, life-enhancing thing.

I feel happier after a good "sesh".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moderator

Because it can change my mood. It can make me happy, sad, glad or want to dance. I played guitar in my yuff and much later in life keyboards and to be honest I was not very good.  When you appreciate how difficult it can be and you hear the quality of some musicians you appreciate what they are doing. But for me the best musicians are not Mr Pyrotechnics but the musicians who can put the music and the silences together. My system allows me to hear both the skills of musicians and more importantly the message they want to get across. Mr Springsteen singing about the despair and pain of a blue collar worker with no work, or the sheer despair of Hollis Brown by Bob Dylan. Or the uplifting Beethovens Ninth or the power and majesty of Pictures at an Exhibition. Or a million new songs, themes, film scores, classical pieces.

Yes you can appreciate them with a 'normal' system but when you take care and select those components that work well in your room then that makes the difference between hearing the music and really enjoying it and what it does to you and your outlook.

My valves wear out quickly as they are on for most of the day but it is money well spent. Especially being locked indoors so much.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't really watch much television, most of it is rubbish and the news is just depressing. I'm lucky enough to have my own room to go and relax and listen to music it can really help when you are feeling a bit down.

I was out shopping the other day and there was a guy playing a saxophone he was really brilliant it made a boring shopping trip into an enjoyable one. I don't know if he was a professional musician but it would not surprise me if he was as they are having to get what work they can these days with Covid.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moderator

Music changed my life in my teens basically. We always had some music in the house, but it was my parents' tastes. As a teenager I discovered there was a world away from operetta and 'light classical' and just as important for a teenager, worlds of musical subcultures. I grew up in North London and as a teenager in the 1970s there seemed no better place in the world. It got me out of the world of moody introspection and into the world of possibilities. Some sensible, some less so. All formative.

I still rely on music to take me to a different place, and it still can.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My father was a keen self-taught musician and played the piano regularly, mostly Bach. We had a Bechstein grand at home. My whole family were/are doctors but at a formative age I realised that what made my father happy wasn't medicine but music. When I decided to go to the Royal Academy of Music he was sceptical since he thought it was a hobby, but it has been my whole life. The Academy was fun - students included Annie Lennox (played flute in my orchestra) , Simon Rattle (in my harmony class, and he had an incredible ear) Irvine Arditti (Arditti Quartet) and David "Joe" Jackson who played keyboards and sax in the jazz band where I played bass. My composition teacher was John Dankwoth. 

I freelanced as a jazz musician until my mid 30s, ending up in Norway for 6 years where I decided to set up as a psychologist for musicians. I returned to London after study and set up in 1988, and since then have seen a few thousand musicians as clients, written 5 books, led an MA course and worked at BIMM rock academy for 12 years, mostly with young singers. I'm mostly retired now, and have gone back to songwriting. Impossible to rehearse with musicians right now so any performing is way in the future, alas. I've had a very interesting life, and met a lot of fascinating people. Never made any money since my rates were always low for working musicians. I just wish I could go onstage with my songs - just one of all the unfulfilled wishes all of us have in the world we live in at present. 

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Super Wammer

To me it's a bit like asking why we eat food! I would rather be blind than deaf and never heard music again.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, wHIZZY said:

Why is music so important in your life.

I can't answer your question (?).

It just is.

I often hear it in my mind (when not listening) or sing as I go about.

Not a fan of background music though, quite the contrary. I wouldn't mind if it was made illegal to play music in restaurants, shops and other public spaces.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, tuga said:

Not a fan of background music though, quite the contrary. I wouldn't mind if it was made illegal to play music in restaurants, shops and other public spaces.

But it keeps the Foster's drinking riffraff away! 

Quote

A spokesperson for McDonald's said: "We have tested the effects of classical music in the past and played it in some of our restaurants as it encourages more acceptable behaviour.

https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/mcdonalds-restaurants-play-classical-music-1408559

Quote

Australian news outlets report that some McDonald’s locations down under have started serving Big Macs with a side of extra Bach. These outposts join locations in Scotland and the United Kingdom that have already effectively used classical music to squash drunken brawls. At a McDonald’s in Glasgow that prompted 200 police calls in just 14 months, managers now play a mix of classical tunes, ranging from full orchestral works to solo piano pieces. While playing late-night classical music isn’t yet a global company policy, the existing research suggests that it very well should be.

https://www.inverse.com/article/33942-mcdonalds-classical-music-drunk-suppression

So McDonald's uses classical music in both the United Kingdom and in Scotland...err, wait :o...either that London was written here in the US or it was written by the fish lady.  xD

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My whole life I’ve followed my fathers same interest in music and hifi. I remember the Tuesday music nights with his mates, music blasting from the lounge from when I was really young listening to great music from my bedroom. Now 40 years on I’m now part of that group.
My wife struggles to understand how I can listen to depressing songs, however for me it’s not necessarily the lyrics it’s more how the construction of the instruments and the production of the track. My wife is convinced I’ve got an addiction to music lol, if there is such a thing. I just couldn’t imagine life without it.

Edited by Beyond you
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Super Wammer

Like a few here, my Father was a music lover, mainly classical, and a bit of Jazz/ big band. He also made a lot of his own amps and speakers in the early days, when money was tight. He was an electrician so he had a head start on many DIYers.

Like Richard, I grew up in North London, but i also had a sister who was 9 years older than me. So at an age of 7, I was being subjected to some of the great music of the sixties through her (Beatles, Stones, Who, Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, CSNY ect) From my teenage years I got into the Trojan label, and all that entailed, sound systems, Youth clubs. Then Bowie arrived on the scene, I was 15, and had never scene or heard anything like it, and even better my parents hated it :) . I was lucky enough to see him twice on the Ziggy Tour, and was at The Hammersmith Odeon, when he retired"Ziggy "

"Hello my name is Colin, and I am a music, and HiFi addict."

Edited by greybeard
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.