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TICKS AND POPS


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Hi everybody, 

I need opinions and advise from some experts in vinyl here. 

Through the years I became interested in vinyl playback and as such I recently added a turntable to my secondary linn system.

The turntable is a thorens td316 (I know, not an lp12 yet ...) with a new cartridge Goldring e3 installed on it. It is plugged in a wakonda P.

As a starter I bought a new vinyl (a record from Ry Cooder) that I frequently use as a test record. Each time I am modifying something (placement etc) I use this record. Let's say that I played 5-10 times this record. Each time I use a record brush, but I did not cleaned it yet with a cleaning solvent .

Now I noticed after a few times of playing that the playback is constantly having some ticks and cracks, like there is dust on an otherwise clean looking record. Could this be static electricity and is this normal after 5-10 times of playing. Or could there be other physical factors that are important.

Just to be clear I don't remember that those clicks where present the first times I played this record. Thanks for your opinions, and advise. Is cleaning always needed on each record and after a few times of playing to let this disappear. Many many thanks folks for your advise.

Edited by Lorre
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Sounds like it could be static, especially if you clean the record with a brush before each use, you are possibly charging the vinyl up! Try not using the brush, or even using an anti static gun which can work very well under these circumstances.

also, is the deck and tone arm earthed correctly?

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If it is static, then simply removing the LP from the sleeve, especially if you’re standing on a man made carpet material, can create static.   I agree that excessive cleaning often increases static, and hence your record can attract more stray debris, hair, dandruff, fluff etc.  Generally, a bit of dust does no harm, and the stylus simply pushes it out of the way.  Hence, gently brushing excess dust and fluff off your stylus is a good idea.  

If the room is dry, try introducing a bit of humidity.  Some well watered pot plants, a room mister with plain water, a little sponge in a wet dish near your turntable, drying towels on the radiator (!) will all add humidity. It all helps. 

I personally never thought a Zerostat gun achieved anything, but that was decades ago when they were first launched.  Wait until you’ve a big collection, would be my advice. Some swear by them!

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I find L'art du Son record cleaning fluid, used liberally, helps with static, a lot, to the point where using the brush, more often than not, does not create static cling.

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If you are hearing a lot more surface noise as you continue to repeat play the record, it is very possible that you have damaged the groove with your stylus--if it is worn- or if it is not set up correctly. This is also somewhat normal of most records if they are played repeatedly over a largish number of cycles. Since you believe that your stylus and tonearm are set up correctly ( vis a vis SRA, VTF, anti skate and VTA), then the best solution is to make sure that everything is as clean as possible, including as Nopiano states, gunk off the stylus. 

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Linn once said that you don't need to clean the records from dust with any kind of tools. The needle of the Cartridge is the one that dips the deepest into the groove and gets the dust out. So you only have to clean your needle from time to time but you should not blow off the dust because you might blow it into the Cartridge housing.

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17 hours ago, Johannes said:

Linn once said that you don't need to clean the records from dust with any kind of tools. The needle of the Cartridge is the one that dips the deepest into the groove and gets the dust out. So you only have to clean your needle from time to time but you should not blow off the dust because you might blow it into the Cartridge housing.

Having collected LP's for decades, I can tell you that a good cleaning regimen with either a wet vacuum or a Ultra Sonic system is extremely beneficial. Letting the stylus push the gunk through the grooves, leading to groove damage makes no sense to me at all! Plus, making sure the stylus is clean is also imperative.

Edited by Daveyf
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10 hours ago, Daveyf said:

Having collected LP's for decades, I can tell you that a good cleaning regimen with either a wet vacuum or a Ultra Sonic system is extremely beneficial. Letting the stylus push the gunk through the grooves, leading to groove damage makes no sense to me at all! Plus, making sure the stylus is clean is also imperative.

I fully agree with this. In fact, I am a relatively recent convert from Johannes' way of thinking to Daveyf's. I use a Keith Monks small nozzle wet vacuum RCM, and would not now put any LP on the TT for the first time without cleaning it. I mark the inner sleeve of each cleaned LP, so that I know that it doesn't necessarily need cleaning. 

Jon Monks, who revived the RCM business founded by his late father, tells me that he has a customer, a Linn dealer in China, who will not sell an LP12 unless the customer also buys a (Keith Monks) RCM. 

David 

Edited by DavidHB
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On 12/10/2020 at 23:30, Lorre said:

yes, I think technically everything is well set up, I was told to use the record brush on each record, not so ? Anyway, when I have the time I will clean the record with disco stat

Linn's advice on record care used to be: Stay away from record cleaners, and let the stylus collect the dust. The stylus can be cleaned with the iconic 'green paper', which can be obtained from a Linn dealer - usually as a free gift.

Most recently, Linn appears to acknowledge the use of a RCM (record cleaning machine). A good practice, many of the people on this forum follow for decades. Myself not included. It has been on my purchasing list for decades, but somehow I always found some other upgrade to invest in - and I live in a small house 🙄

Edited by TooManyCatweazles
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I’ve had a wet clean RCM on my “ to buy” list for ages. I’m currently happy with a pair of “SpinClean” type baths - one to clean, one to rinse, but still think I’ll end up with a RCM, probably a Pro-Ject VC-E, that isn’t too big. The longer these lockdowns go on, the more I want to help the local economy.

’troll

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Got a project VCS2 as a Christmas present last year. Use it all the time and much better than the knosti I was using before.

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Is the Project VCS2 better than a Keith Monks?

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23 minutes ago, Johannes said:

Is the Project VCS2 better than a Keith Monks?

Not compared them to each other.

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30 minutes ago, Johannes said:

Is the Project VCS2 better than a Keith Monks?

6 minutes ago, emcc_3e said:

Not compared them to each other.

I have used both, as the (non Linn) Hi-Fi store in our local town has a record cleaning service using the VCS. There are quite a few Keith Monks models. I use the discOveryOne Redux, which is the more fully featured (and expensive) of the two models produced for the home user market.

It is impossible to do true A/B testing of RCMs, as, once a record is cleaned, you cannot return it to its previous state to try on another machine. But I am sure that the Redux gets more dirt off the record surface, so the records sound better after cleaning, than the VCS. The build quality is also better, and cleaning is quicker, a lot quieter, and involves less faff. The downside? The Redux costs three times as much as the VCS and is intended to use special cleaning fluid (albeit only about 5ml per side cleaned) which is only available from stockists. There is a much less expensive Monks machine, the Prodigy, which is made largely of bamboo, and is supposed to work as well as the Redux, albeit more slowly and lacking some of the convenience features of its more costly sibling. The Prodigy does use the "small nozzle" technology of the other Monks machines, which I think is the key to their effectiveness.

David

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