Phobic

Audiophile confession booth

Recommended Posts

Super Wammer
22 hours ago, Amormusic said:

Before I packed away all cds I was serious OCD and had them all ordered and categorised.

My kit must be central, exactly, in the rack. Years ago my mrs would move it by a mm or two just for a laugh. This wound me up no end.

I dust my speakers more than anything else in the house. I could live with a bit of dust here and there, its character building. But on the speaks, hell no! These boys gotta sparkle at me, like a smile, when I look at them 👍

I have to ensure that every CD is positioned within its case with the label aligned exactly upright. Some are more difficult than others as they don't have an "obvious" top or bottom, so I use the little writing around the edge of the CD, and centre it at the bottom. I once re-aligned the entire 3000-odd collection of a friend this way - I was up early and bored....

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Super Wammer
4 minutes ago, Jules_S said:

I have to ensure that every CD is positioned within its case with the label aligned exactly upright. Some are more difficult than others as they don't have an "obvious" top or bottom, so I use the little writing around the edge of the CD, and centre it at the bottom. I once re-aligned the entire 3000-odd collection of a friend this way - I was up early and bored....

Not entirely sure which 1 applies to you

OCD
/əʊsiːˈdiː/
noun
  1. PSYCHIATRY
    short for obsessive-compulsive disorder.
    "Hughes suffers from OCD and repeatedly washes his hands"
adjective
INFORMAL
  1. having a tendency towards excessive orderliness, perfectionism, and great attention to detail.
    "I'm not exactly one of those OCD people who is afraid of germs"
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, CnoEvil said:

I thought that was arguments about cables on HiFi forums. B|

It may have been that then, most likely both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, toms wait said:

It may have been that then, most likely both.

DSOTM sounds much better when expensive cables are used.

Does that cover both?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Super Wammer
13 minutes ago, CnoEvil said:

DSOTM sounds much better when expensive cables are used.

Does that cover both?

depends which way round you're connecting them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Phobic said:

depends which way round you're connecting them

Well, of course it does.....you can't plug the IEC end of a Mains Cable into the wall socket. :doh:

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, CnoEvil said:

DSOTM sounds much better when expensive cables are used.

Does that cover both?

 :goodone:... especially mains :ph34r:

Edited by 2010*zuma

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Jules_S said:

I have to ensure that every CD is positioned within its case with the label aligned exactly upright. Some are more difficult than others as they don't have an "obvious" top or bottom, so I use the little writing around the edge of the CD, and centre it at the bottom. I once re-aligned the entire 3000-odd collection of a friend this way - I was up early and bored....

Bless you Sir. There is another nutter like me!!

Mine were categorised and alphabetical and I could spot a switcheroo from 100 paces (family members did this for fun, b*stards. 😂).

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Super Wammer
Just now, Amormusic said:

Bless you Sir. There is another nutter like me!!

Mine were categorised and alphabetical and I could spot a switcheroo from 100 paces (family members did this for fun, b*stards. 😂).

Oh absolutely. I thought it went without saying that all collections need to be categorised alphabetically, and within chronological order within artist. And also in genres groupings too if you so fancy :D

I did do a really stupid experiment some years ago and thought I'd categorise all my classical LPs in label and catalogue number order. Looks wonderful on the shelf. But I'm buggered if I could find anything I want to listen to! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Jules_S said:

Oh absolutely. I thought it went without saying that all collections need to be categorised alphabetically, and within chronological order within artist. And also in genres groupings too if you so fancy :D

I did do a really stupid experiment some years ago and thought I'd categorise all my classical LPs in label and catalogue number order. Looks wonderful on the shelf. But I'm buggered if I could find anything I want to listen to! 

Unless it's done auto-biographically, it's not been done properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Jules_S said:

Oh absolutely. I thought it went without saying that all collections need to be categorised alphabetically, and within chronological order within artist. And also in genres groupings too if you so fancy :D

Um yes. This. Oh dear, I shall take myself off for a good talking to!!

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Jules_S said:

I did do a really stupid experiment some years ago and thought I'd categorise all my classical LPs in label and catalogue number order. Looks wonderful on the shelf. But I'm buggered if I could find anything I want to listen to! 

I'm glad that you said that it was a stupid experiment because I would have called it a stupid experiment if you didn't already.  :P  I've heard of people who organize their classical music by label.  That doesn't make any sense to me at all.  Does anyone ponder which piece of classical music to hear and then think to themselves, "Gee, I really want to hear an EMI today."  :D

Maybe there are people who think that way, but I really wonder what kind of fans of classical music they are if they take such an approach.  :zip:  So, yes, I'm glad that you've abandoned that approach.  ;)

Cataloging classical music recordings is not easy.  There really isn't a straightforward way of doing it.  The majority of my classical CD collection is kept in these shoebox looking boxes which are made just for storing CDs and hold ~30 jewel cases.  I have a stack of these boxes on a shelf in one of my closets.  My basic organizing structure works on these levels:

  1. CDs I purchase new and those I purchase used are stored in different boxes.  That might seem illogical to most here and I admit that it doesn't really make a lot of sense.  xD  That said, some of the used CDs I pick up have pretty grungy looking jewel cases (I usually make sure the CDs themselves are fine) and I don't want them rubbing shoulders with the CDs I've purchased new which I have tried to keep in as good shape as possible. 
  2. The second level of organizing music is by era.  Early music (Pre-Baroque to very early Baroque), Baroque, Galant/Mannheim music, early Classical era, late Classical era, 19th century Romantic music (usually broken down into groups of composer nationalities just to make sense of having multiple boxes within this category), and then 20th century+ music.  As the collection grows, I refine things a bit and that means sometimes adding categories and moving CDs around (all of that means updating the catalog too :S).
  3. Within each category/box, I organize things by composer.  Within a composer, I try to keep the chamber music together and the orchestral music together.  Sometimes a CD will have music from multiple composers on it.  Sometimes it's easy to make sense of that, but not always when you have something like a CD which has music from, say, Bach and Prokofiev on it.  o.O  In cases like that, I just put it with one of the composers and I have to rely on the catalog to be able to find the miscatagorized music.

There certainly are other ways of organizing classical recordings, but this system seems to work for me.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, HectorHughMunro said:

Here’s a confession that will alienate many;

I don’t like Dark Side Of The Moon. I don’t even think it’s a massively good recording. 

It's got lots of audiophile-approved tings, clangs and rattles, though! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Klassik said:

I'm glad that you said that it was a stupid experiment because I would have called it a stupid experiment if you didn't already.  :P  I've heard of people who organize their classical music by label.  That doesn't make any sense to me at all.  Does anyone ponder which piece of classical music to hear and then think to themselves, "Gee, I really want to hear an EMI today."  :D

Maybe there are people who think that way, but I really wonder what kind of fans of classical music they are if they take such an approach.  :zip:  So, yes, I'm glad that you've abandoned that approach.  ;)

Cataloging classical music recordings is not easy.  There really isn't a straightforward way of doing it.  The majority of my classical CD collection is kept in these shoebox looking boxes which are made just for storing CDs and hold ~30 jewel cases.  I have a stack of these boxes on a shelf in one of my closets.  My basic organizing structure works on these levels:

  1. CDs I purchase new and those I purchase used are stored in different boxes.  That might seem illogical to most here and I admit that it doesn't really make a lot of sense.  xD  That said, some of the used CDs I pick up have pretty grungy looking jewel cases (I usually make sure the CDs themselves are fine) and I don't want them rubbing shoulders with the CDs I've purchased new which I have tried to keep in as good shape as possible. 
  2. The second level of organizing music is by era.  Early music (Pre-Baroque to very early Baroque), Baroque, Galant/Mannheim music, early Classical era, late Classical era, 19th century Romantic music (usually broken down into groups of composer nationalities just to make sense of having multiple boxes within this category), and then 20th century+ music.  As the collection grows, I refine things a bit and that means sometimes adding categories and moving CDs around (all of that means updating the catalog too :S).
  3. Within each category/box, I organize things by composer.  Within a composer, I try to keep the chamber music together and the orchestral music together.  Sometimes a CD will have music from multiple composers on it.  Sometimes it's easy to make sense of that, but not always when you have something like a CD which has music from, say, Bach and Prokofiev on it.  o.O  In cases like that, I just put it with one of the composers and I have to rely on the catalog to be able to find the miscatagorized music.

There certainly are other ways of organizing classical recordings, but this system seems to work for me.

Do you ever get time to listen to any of it?

What's wrong with alphabetical on composer name?

Imagine if I had to rearrange my Led Zeppelin vinyl by genre, id be chopping my albums up into small torus's - or is it tori? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember hearing about somebody who (long before home computers were generally available) used to make a note of each time they played an album, and at the end of each year, they would produce their own top ten most played albums. We all thought this was weird and laughable at the time.

Although not exactly the same, Spotify now does something similar automatically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.