Townshend Audio

*White Paper* The Sound of Music and Error in Speaker Cables

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I have long argued that the most important factor in a speaker cable is its geometry: the way the two conductors are arranged. This is more critical than the conductor and the insulation because the wrong geometry causes high frequency distortion that results in a hard, edgy sound that many have encountered in their quest to build the ultimate system.

In the attached white paper I explain how to measure the effects that different geometries have on speaker cables and shows exactly what they do to the frequency response.

https://mcusercontent.com/37242be2279a7265bcf86ab2a/files/a8616d4b-11bd-43dd-94bf-9d1c4a1fe79b/The_Sound_of_Music_and_Error_in_Your_Speaker_Cables_1_.pdf

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At least try and show the author a bit of respect. Everyone's an expert these days.9_9

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On 20/11/2020 at 04:33, Townshend Audio said:

I have long argued that the most important factor in a speaker cable is its geometry: the way the two conductors are arranged. This is more critical than the conductor and the insulation because the wrong geometry causes high frequency distortion that results in a hard, edgy sound that many have encountered in their quest to build the ultimate system.

In the attached white paper I explain how to measure the effects that different geometries have on speaker cables and shows exactly what they do to the frequency response.

https://mcusercontent.com/37242be2279a7265bcf86ab2a/files/a8616d4b-11bd-43dd-94bf-9d1c4a1fe79b/The_Sound_of_Music_and_Error_in_Your_Speaker_Cables_1_.pdf

Worked for eight years in a factory making telephone cable.  One process that had to be set was 'the lay of the cable.' This was how the cables's cores were twisted together.  We had a laboratory which experimented with the 'lay' to see its effect on cross-talk.

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18 hours ago, Ron Hilditch said:

Worked for eight years in a factory making telephone cable.  One process that had to be set was 'the lay of the cable.' This was how the cables's cores were twisted together.  We had a laboratory which experimented with the 'lay' to see its effect on cross-talk.

Yep, that's a big factor in making Cat digital cable. Belden spent a lot of computer hours designing how the 4 pairs are twisted and how they lay.

Unfortunately the Townshend paper started with an incorrect premise and made dumb test errors.

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The main reason for the test in the first place was to find a simple measurement that quantified the difference between different geometries. The easiest way is to see what the voltage drop was across a single conductor. There is no sleight of hand or skullduggery going on here. I am an engineer and engineers only work with the truth, because everyone can see when your bridge falls down. (doctors bury their mistakes, lawyers suggest better luck next time, accountants can come up with any figures they like). What fascinates me, is the imagination of the trolls who don't want to know.

I know there is a difference between cables and the is not down to a slight frequency variation at 20kHz, there is something more going on and I have tried to identify it.

Please participate in the Zoom call at 6 PM GMT 5 Dec 2020. Details to follow.

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Super Wammer
On 20/11/2020 at 14:30, Speedskater said:

See thread:

*  *  *  *

That error filled paper is being torn apart in some more technical forums.

The author just doesn't understand how transmission lines work.

Could I ask as the methodology and details of the experiment have been set out clearly by the author have you tried it ? If so what were your results and did they differ from the findings in the paper ?

I make no claims to having anything like enough technical know how regarding this and most electrical subjects but it would be nice to at least find some way of measuring the differences that some of hear in different cables . This is what the author seems to be doing but appears to being derided for his attempts without in what i can see any attempts to replicate his work . I think a little bit more respect for trying to develop testing and cast light on a subject that is much debated is the very least he deserves . He may well be wrong and there may well be much more to be discovered but at least and attempt is being made to find a repeatable test to show a difference .

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23 minutes ago, bencat said:

Could I ask as the methodology and details of the experiment have been set out clearly by the author have you tried it ? If so what were your results and did they differ from the findings in the paper ?

There are standard methodology tests and have been so for decades. I'm sure that using standard tests, there will be measured frequency response differences in those many cables.

But those tests will be repeatable & reproducible and have quantifiable results. And no, many details in his test were not set out.

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On 24/11/2020 at 09:54, Townshend Audio said:

The main reason for the test in the first place was to find a simple measurement that quantified the difference between different geometries. The easiest way is to see what the voltage drop was across a single conductor. There is no sleight of hand or skullduggery going on here. I am an engineer and engineers only work with the truth, because everyone can see when your bridge falls down. (doctors bury their mistakes, lawyers suggest better luck next time, accountants can come up with any figures they like). What fascinates me, is the imagination of the trolls who don't want to know.

I know there is a difference between cables and the is not down to a slight frequency variation at 20kHz, there is something more going on and I have tried to identify it.

Please participate in the Zoom call at 6 PM GMT 5 Dec 2020. Details to follow.

Totally agree!  Used to be a cable sceptic, until I bought some Cable Talk biwire 3.1 cables, at the same time as buying new speakers.  Sounded flat and lifeless, so much so sent the speakers back to the maker.  Came back with  frequency response graphs and a clean bill of health.  Replaced the cables with 1.5 sq. mm flex and it sounded much better.  Experimented with different makes of speaker cables and eventually settled on MIT.  Now feel interconnects and power chords make a noticeable difference.  No problem if you don't agree, no need to get hot under the collar about it.  My money, my ears, my choice. 

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