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21 hours ago, Phobic said:

Sorry to be pedantic, but just in case others are reading this the DSM port is 100MB/s which equals 800Mbps. 100 Mega Bytes per second = 800 mega bits per second.

so the 100Mbps is far below what the DSM can actually do.

sorry wasn't trying to teach you to suck eggs :) it's never obvious how much knowledge people have so was just trying to be helpful.

there's clearly something odd going on with your powerline from what you say, very strange.

I think you may be wrong about 800Mbps.

According documentation this is Fast Ethernet port.

image.thumb.png.674449696bb4f67db2de08027e54ed59.png

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28 minutes ago, rduras said:

I think you may be wrong about 800Mbps.

According documentation this is Fast Ethernet port.

image.thumb.png.674449696bb4f67db2de08027e54ed59.png

100Base-T = 100MB/s

100MB/s = 800 Mbps

it's the difference between Bits and Bytes

https://www.attplans.com/resources/difference-mbps-and-mbps/#:~:text=In computer lingo%2C the lower,MBps stands Megabytes per second.

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deleted

Edited by Nopiano
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55 minutes ago, Phobic said:

That's incorrect - 100Base-T (aka Fast Ethernet) is 100 Megabits per second, not 100 MegaBytes per second. So Fast Ethernet is 100Mbps, or 12.5MBps.

Mick

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rduras is right:

100 Base-T = 100 Mbit/s = 12,5 MB/s

I really don‘t know why Linn uses a standard of the last millennium. Even 100 Mbit/s are enough for 192/24 a 1 Gbit/s line sounds better.

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ah oops, I'm wrong sorry :oops:

funny thing is I've been thinking that 100baseT was 100MB/s for decades and I've got a bloody degree in computing science :D

how embarrassing, that might explain some of the confusing conversations I've had with network architects in the past...

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On 21/12/2020 at 14:30, DavidHB said:

... especially as the Ethernet ports on DS(M)s are only 100Mbps. That is not only adequate for the intended use, but also, I believe, less noisy than faster connections.

David

And Sorry David, you were right :$

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19 minutes ago, Ben Webster said:

I really don‘t know why Linn uses a standard of the last millennium. Even 100 Mbit/s are enough for 192/24 a 1 Gbit/s line sounds better.

it's adequate to do what is required of the port, and, as I said, I suspect it's less noisy than a gigabit port, which helps to keep the analogue noise floor down. How can a gigabit port sound better? And even if it did, how would you know? Linn DSs and DSMs have only ever had 100Base-T ports.

1 minute ago, Phobic said:

And Sorry David, you were right :$

Thank you. But I did misread your post, so I guess  it's a case of :$ all round, But who cares, it's nearly Christmas.

David

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26 minutes ago, DavidHB said:

, I suspect it's less noisy than a gigabit port, which helps to keep the analogue noise floor down. How can a gigabit port sound better? And even if it did, how would you know?

I tried it with several different setups with Linn DS and other DAC who support 1 Gbit/s. Using a NAS with different NetCards where I can switch between 100 MBit/s and 1 Gbit/s

I don‘t know why but I guess (!) chips who only support 100 Mbit/s have more stress (and create more jitter). 1 Gbit/s chips may play in a more relaxed way.

Again: it’s only a try to explain what I and other people hear very clear in a multiple blind test.

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12 minutes ago, Ben Webster said:

I tried it with several different setups with Linn DS and other DAC who support 1 Gbit/s. Using a NAS with different NetCards where I can switch between 100 MBit/s and 1 Gbit/s

Yes, but that was at the NAS end. At the DS/DSM end, it's always been 100Base-T. Which in turn of course means that the connection to the DS/DSM always runs at 100Mbps. I'm not denying that changing the switch can sometimes have an effect on sound quality (which IMO is likely to be noise-related*), but the change cannot be a function of connection speed as such, as that does not vary.

David

*I have seen your suggestion that sound quality changes are the result of varying jitter in the network connection, on several occasions, including in a certain cable manufacturer's literature. But I have yet to see any explanation of how packet switched data, which is buffered, clocked and rendered as a stream at the receiving end can be subject to jitter generated at the sending end or in the cable.

Edited by DavidHB
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As mentioned above we tried it also with non-Linn (where we were able to switch between 100 Mbit/s and 1 Gbit/s).

But I only shared OUR experience and I bet the next generation of Linn Streamer will provide 1 Gbit/s (because older hardware isn’t available anymore 😜).

Edited by Ben Webster
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4 minutes ago, Ben Webster said:

As mentioned above we tried it also with non-Linn (where we were able to switch between 100 Mbit/s and 1 Gbit/s).

What applies to other brands may not be relevant to whatever design Linn produces. If you use your test as a basis for criticising Linn's choice of connection speed, you are not really comparing apples and apples.

6 minutes ago, Ben Webster said:

I bet the next generation of Linn Streamer will provide 1 Gbit/s (because older hardware isn’t available anymore

Arguably, the next generation of Linn streamers is already here, in the form of the Selekt and, more recently, the MDSM/4. Both of which have 100Mbps connections.

David

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I guess we will never have the same opinion. 😜

I‘m not critising Linn, I said „I don‘ t understand“. 

And the next (!) generation isn‘t available yet.

Merry Christmas.🎄 

Edited by Ben Webster
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2 hours ago, Ben Webster said:

rduras is right:

100 Base-T = 100 Mbit/s = 12,5 MB/s

I really don‘t know why Linn uses a standard of the last millennium. Even 100 Mbit/s are enough for 192/24 a 1 Gbit/s line sounds better.

Hmmm.  If one uses a mixed port Ethernet switch, you might not actually know which you think sounds better.  

Also network jitter aka varying latency is different to the jitter that audio buffs talk about.  Seldom an issue for hi res audio, but can affect VOIP and heavy video packets transfer rate consistency.  Buffers a re used to minimize packet jitter effects and latency can be automatically smoothed.

Read more here

https://techterms.com/definition/jitter

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