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Cisco 2940 switch set up help needed


savvypaul
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1 minute ago, jamster said:

You must have been quick off the mark as I changed it to argumentum ad ignorantiam.  I meant to refer to the logical fallacy you are using, not you personally. (I realised I'd misremembered it.)  That fallacy is very prevalent on this forum.  Don't feel singled out.

This reminds me (albeit in reverse) of when I ran a railway line. One of my Group Station Managers wrote to tell me that he felt he had been indirectly criticised. I told him that could be easily corrected.

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1 hour ago, savvypaul said:

This reminds me (albeit in reverse) of when I ran a railway line. One of my Group Station Managers wrote to tell me that he felt he had been indirectly criticised. I told him that could be easily corrected.

Good story, thanks for sharing.

23 hours ago, bencat said:

A question because I really am not that knowledgeable in this area . At Kegworth I used a Linskys RE6400 WiFi extender which has an ethernet socket at the bottom and I connected this last time to a router then anything that needed a connection to the router. Would I be able to connect the Linsky to a switch and then all the rest to that ? If i can then I will bring a switch and use it at the show anyone interested can hear it working if they want to . If the above will not work then sorry will have to just use the Netgear Router again .

Yes.  You can use it as an access point (connected via Ethernet) rather than a repeater (picking up and rebroadcasting the existing Wifi signal).  It is generally considered a better way to do it.  Use the second option (Access Point) shown below:

image.thumb.png.06636383be7c2466d8689a38755cffa2.png

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7 hours ago, jamster said:

Good story, thanks for sharing.

Yes.  You can use it as an access point (connected via Ethernet) rather than a repeater (picking up and rebroadcasting the existing Wifi signal).  It is generally considered a better way to do it.  Use the second option (Access Point) shown below:

image.thumb.png.06636383be7c2466d8689a38755cffa2.png

Thanks for that will bring one with me along with the netgear router and see if I can get it working.

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On 13/03/2021 at 10:36, jamster said:

With an unmanaged switch, there is nothing to configure.  Unmanaged = no end user configuration at all.  

We may have been talking at cross purposes.

I was referring to "unmanaged switches" according to the EDS / Hewlett Packard / DXC Technology IT service team definition of "managed switches"

Which is as follows:

Managed switch = Installed and configured and managed by a remote team that is constantly monitoring the state of the network, 24/7 365. If any switch goes down, a high priority "ticket" is raised to investigate it / get it fixed / replaced. These switches can be reconfigured at any time by the Network Management Team, subject to the appropriate "change request" paperwork being raised, or a ticket in the event of it not working properly. This "Managed Switch" definition can - in certain contexts - be extended to switches that can become managed switches.

Unmanaged switch = a switch that cannot be managed effectively by a remote Network Management team. It's possible that such switches may still be configurable.

Unconfigurable switch = a switch that cannot be configured in any way.

Anyway, regardless, every Cisco and HP Procurve business switch that I've come across can be used with no configuration whatsoever. Simply by using the default factory config. Giving the best of both worlds. You can use them fresh out the box or you can configure them. Whatever suits the particular user best.

Configuring these switches is entirely optional.

I don't know if configuiring these switches would result in sound quality improvements. Because I've not tested it yet, and I'm not aware of anyone who has. Which seems a bit ridiculous given some of the more "esoteric" networking tweaks that have been reported to have affected the sound of hif-fi systems.

There is no doubt that configuring business switches should lead to minor user benefits, such as the speed at which a PC starts to communicate on a network after being switched on - by enabling spanning tree portfast on the appropriate ports. I personally find it annoying to have to wait 30 seconds to browse on the internet after switching a PC on.

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On 22/03/2021 at 22:45, lindsayt said:

We may have been talking at cross purposes.

I was referring to "unmanaged switches" according to the EDS / Hewlett Packard / DXC Technology IT service team definition of "managed switches"

Which is as follows:

Managed switch = Installed and configured and managed by a remote team that is constantly monitoring the state of the network, 24/7 365. If any switch goes down, a high priority "ticket" is raised to investigate it / get it fixed / replaced. These switches can be reconfigured at any time by the Network Management Team, subject to the appropriate "change request" paperwork being raised, or a ticket in the event of it not working properly. This "Managed Switch" definition can - in certain contexts - be extended to switches that can become managed switches.

Unmanaged switch = a switch that cannot be managed effectively by a remote Network Management team. It's possible that such switches may still be configurable.

Unconfigurable switch = a switch that cannot be configured in any way.

Yes I was using the simpler definition of an unmanaged = unconfigurable, see:

"an unmanaged switch is simple, connecting Ethernet devices with a fixed configuration that you cannot make any changes to"

https://blogs.cisco.com/manufacturing/managed-vs-unmanaged-switches-explore-the-benefits-of-network-automationdtidesootr000515ccidcc001101

"Compared with managed switches, unmanaged switches seem to be more “brainless”. They are a type of plug & play Ethernet network switch. What users need to do is to plug them in and wait them to work." 

https://community.fs.com/blog/managed-vs-unmanaged-switch-which-one-can-satisfy-your-real-need.html

Quote

Anyway, regardless, every Cisco and HP Procurve business switch that I've come across can be used with no configuration whatsoever. Simply by using the default factory config. Giving the best of both worlds. You can use them fresh out the box or you can configure them. Whatever suits the particular user best.

Configuring these switches is entirely optional.

Agree but I tend to find that the "out of box experience" is not as well optimised for home networks.  As you say, spanning tree is often enabled by default, which is rarely necessary on a home network and can sometimes cause issues.  A basic unmanaged switch won't have it:

https://community.netgear.com/t5/Unmanaged-Switches-Forum/Netgear-GS308/td-p/1717979

Quote

I don't know if configuiring these switches would result in sound quality improvements. Because I've not tested it yet, and I'm not aware of anyone who has. Which seems a bit ridiculous given some of the more "esoteric" networking tweaks that have been reported to have affected the sound of hif-fi systems.

There is no doubt that configuring business switches should lead to minor user benefits, such as the speed at which a PC starts to communicate on a network after being switched on - by enabling spanning tree portfast on the appropriate ports. I personally find it annoying to have to wait 30 seconds to browse on the internet after switching a PC on.

Yup, me too.  I switch off STP on edge ports (same effect as portfast).  

My view is that switch should make 0% difference to sound quality. 

1. Clearly, transmission of packets on layer 3 is unlikely to cause any SQ degredation, any serious use of streaming will be using either TCP, or UDP with its own error correction algo on top, to ensure the stream arrives "bit perfect".  (Latency is less relevant to streaming as almost all streaming receivers will use a healthy buffer).  Any network malfunction is likely to be experienced as sound cutting out / stuttering, which is very easy to spot cf.  loss of fidelity ("veiled", "loss of fine details" etc.)

2.  There's an argument that a switch could introduce EMI from a noise PSU.  I am not expert enough to rule this out entirely but I have read that it would be rare and that any sensible DAC should filter out any material EMI on the inbound anyway.  I have also not seen any evidence that CISCO PSUs are intrinsically lower noise than any others. 

We've been over this in other threads and I know there are people who disagree with me based on their own experience. I can't rule out that those people have an unusually EMI susceptible DAC or a particularly noisy switch, but without empirical evidence I do find it hard to accept that this problem is prevalent.

I can see why it may trigger "audiophilia nervosa" though, and a level of confirmation basis as a result.

I think the best argument for owning a CISCO or other professional switch is because it is fun to :)  I have several VLANs, multi-WAN and all sorts of other trickery on the go. 

Chris

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17 hours ago, Fourlegs said:

Has anyone connected their cheap as chips Cisco 2940 with fibre?

My two new eBay ones are working fine by cable but I thought I might just try connecting them by fibre for fun. 

If I knew how to I would but sadly I do not.

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On 22/03/2021 at 22:45, lindsayt said:

We may have been talking at cross purposes.

I was referring to "unmanaged switches" according to the EDS / Hewlett Packard / DXC Technology IT service team definition of "managed switches"

Which is as follows:

Managed switch = Installed and configured and managed by a remote team that is constantly monitoring the state of the network, 24/7 365. If any switch goes down, a high priority "ticket" is raised to investigate it / get it fixed / replaced. These switches can be reconfigured at any time by the Network Management Team, subject to the appropriate "change request" paperwork being raised, or a ticket in the event of it not working properly. This "Managed Switch" definition can - in certain contexts - be extended to switches that can become managed switches.

Unmanaged switch = a switch that cannot be managed effectively by a remote Network Management team. It's possible that such switches may still be configurable.

Unconfigurable switch = a switch that cannot be configured in any way.

Anyway, regardless, every Cisco and HP Procurve business switch that I've come across can be used with no configuration whatsoever. Simply by using the default factory config. Giving the best of both worlds. You can use them fresh out the box or you can configure them. Whatever suits the particular user best.

Configuring these switches is entirely optional.

I don't know if configuiring these switches would result in sound quality improvements. Because I've not tested it yet, and I'm not aware of anyone who has. Which seems a bit ridiculous given some of the more "esoteric" networking tweaks that have been reported to have affected the sound of hif-fi systems.

There is no doubt that configuring business switches should lead to minor user benefits, such as the speed at which a PC starts to communicate on a network after being switched on - by enabling spanning tree portfast on the appropriate ports. I personally find it annoying to have to wait 30 seconds to browse on the internet after switching a PC on.

I also used to work for HP and sell procurve LAN as well as the FC SAN switches and directors.  1997-2009.  Before the once great company went into free fall.

That said I am Deffo SOHO switch sq agnostic, I would not dream of using a managed switch on my home network. 
 

Been using the Netgear blue unmanned items for a few years now.  None has ever failed.  Small easily surface mounted, i label each port, fit and forget, beyond vacuuming or blowing dust out every few months. 
 

Zero touch. Cheap, reliable, performant. All that is needed for a home switch. 
 

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12 hours ago, Chumpchops said:

I also used to work for HP and sell procurve LAN as well as the FC SAN switches and directors.  1997-2009.  Before the once great company went into free fall.

That said I am Deffo SOHO switch sq agnostic, I would not dream of using a managed switch on my home network. 
 

Been using the Netgear blue unmanned items for a few years now.  None has ever failed.  Small easily surface mounted, i label each port, fit and forget, beyond vacuuming or blowing dust out every few months. 
 

Zero touch. Cheap, reliable, performant. All that is needed for a home switch. 
 

Indeed. A cheap consumer grade switch is all that is needed in order to expand a home network from the 4 ports commonly provided on routers provided by ISP's (Internet Service Providers).

However there are reports of people finding their audio systems sounding better with business grade switches or audiophile switches.

Bearing in mind how pleasantly cheap used or NOS business grade switches are, it makes a lot of sense to try these - as savvypaul has done.

With the business grade switches in my home and in every client site that I worked at, the switches were never vacuumed nor had dust blown out from them. They were simply installed and left to do their job with the Network Team monitoring them for any failures.

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1 hour ago, lindsayt said:

Indeed. A cheap consumer grade switch is all that is needed in order to expand a home network from the 4 ports commonly provided on routers provided by ISP's (Internet Service Providers).

However there are reports of people finding their audio systems sounding better with business grade switches or audiophile switches.

Bearing in mind how pleasantly cheap used or NOS business grade switches are, it makes a lot of sense to try these - as savvypaul has done.

With the business grade switches in my home and in every client site that I worked at, the switches were never vacuumed nor had dust blown out from them. They were simply installed and left to do their job with the Network Team monitoring them for any failures.

Sure, a few reports on audiophile quality switches.   Am still smiling at that notion. Try them all.  Measure away.  Foo is trying to take ip residence in the digital domain.  Good luck. Each to etc.  fools and... etc. 

matters not.  Tweak everything... 

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You really don't want to get into configuring and managing Cisco switches for a home HiFi setup. I'm Microsoft Cerified and a Microsoft Trainer  and I find the Cisco stuff heavy going. I leave that to my brother who is Cisco Certifed to Expert level and runs a Bank Network. It's way over the top for home usage.

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On 25/03/2021 at 21:23, Fourlegs said:

Has anyone connected their cheap as chips Cisco 2940 with fibre?

My two new eBay ones are working fine by cable but I thought I might just try connecting them by fibre for fun. 

Yes I have,  and surprisingly it does improve the sound.   You do need a Cisco 2940 compatible SFP transceiver module at each end.  I have heard people rolling their SFPs and getting changes in SQ, though I have not done this. 

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8 hours ago, Duckworp said:

Yes I have,  and surprisingly it does improve the sound.   You do need a Cisco 2940 compatible SFP transceiver module at each end.  I have heard people rolling their SFPs and getting changes in SQ, though I have not done this. 

Thanks, out of interest which SFP do you use? The supplier of my 2940 sent me these as a gift.

SFB.thumb.jpg.f93c60d70b208bd88a109c378b14cf6a.jpg

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48 minutes ago, Fourlegs said:

Thanks, out of interest which SFP do you use? The supplier of my 2940 sent me these as a gift.

SFB.thumb.jpg.f93c60d70b208bd88a109c378b14cf6a.jpg

I am offering a 2940 with two of these fibre receivers free for cost of carriage  otherwise it will be recycled!

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