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Good evening everyone

I have had two Kandids so far, serial numbers 0420 and 1430. Now I've heard that the current Kandids with a serial number >2000 are supposed to sound significantly better than their predecessors. Is anyone among you able to verify this statement, and further describe the differences both sonically and in its construction?

Many thanks in advance.

Rille

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I was being a little flippant. However, I believe that Scantech only average one Kandid a day, so imagine that production techniques improve over time. The Klyde certainly improved over its lifespan. I had a late model and found none of the criticisms that were made in the past.

’troll

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I agree with you, because I have had similar experiences with the Akiva as you did with the Klyde. I had one of the first Klydes and didn’t want one after that. With the Akiva, I had three ones, I noticed that it got better and better over the years. In my last Akiva, the attachment of the stylus in the cantilever has been changed.

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Makes sense in anything manufactured over time. Techniques improve, material get swapped out etc. We see it in cars with many  first year problems ironed out over the 4-5 year lifespan of any model. 

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  • 1 month later...

Last Thursday, my new Kandid arrived. It is already my third one and has the serial number 2093. As always, the installation went off quite quickly.

After a week of play in, in which nothing dramatic has actually happened, it plays so gracefully. Nothing but nothing distracts from the musical happenings. No matter what music is played, I accept almost everything as it comes and I’m just under the spell.

Finally, the harmony I have long missed in the Akiva/EkosSE combination, which I have always appreciated so much, is back and even better. As if the music goes straight out of the grouve into the head without detours. Kandid/Ekos SE1 is a fantastic combination. It’s hard to believe it could get any better. It’s a wonderful feeling to have arrived.

Thank you to the divine hands and ears that made this possible.

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I just checked the serial number of mine; 1941. I was expecting to see 1999. :D

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Linn has always had a policy of continuous improvements in parts and manufacturing, it is only when a significant design change is made when they change the model designation.  Ekos SE to Ekos SE/1 is an example.  The way the diamond was mounted to the cantilever in the Akiva was changed three times in the life of that cartridge.  I'm sure other changes are made as well.  I'm not so sure about how much the actual construction techniques at Lyra change over time as they are hand made by Yoshinori Mishima who is a master cartridge builder, although we hopefully all learn as the days pass.  But in our constantly changing world, where rapid improvements in materials and manufacturing technology are the rule in electronics, materials and the ability to machine them to tighter tolerances are improving all the time.

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Posted (edited)
On 28/04/2021 at 17:57, ThomasOK said:

I'm not so sure about how much the actual construction techniques at Lyra change over time as they are hand made by Yoshinori Mishima who is a master cartridge builder

... not to mention what the parts suppliers like Ogura may have changed, or not changed over the years

Edited by TooManyCatweazles
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1 hour ago, TooManyCatweazles said:

... not to mention what the parts suppliers like Ogura may have changed, or not changed over the years

Yes, my understanding is that Ogura makes the stylus/cantilever/coil assemblies that Lyra use for themselves and the Kandid.  They also make them for a number of other cartridge manufacturers including Koetsu.  Obviously it would have been Ogura who made the diamond mounting changes I mentioned above. 

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, ThomasOK said:

Yes, my understanding is that Ogura makes the stylus/cantilever/coil assemblies that Lyra use for themselves and the Kandid.  They also make them for a number of other cartridge manufacturers including Koetsu.  

Wow, that's interesting.  I would imagine this assembly is a major (if not the major) contributing factor to the sound of the finished cartridge.  I guess the magnets and mountings also contribute but I'm still surprised how different these cartridges sound. 

Edited by sktn77a
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On 01/05/2021 at 17:14, sktn77a said:
On 01/05/2021 at 17:09, ThomasOK said:

Yes, my understanding is that Ogura makes the stylus/cantilever/coil assemblies that Lyra use for themselves and the Kandid.  They also make them for a number of other cartridge manufacturers including Koetsu.  

Wow, that's interesting.  I would imagine this assembly is a major (if not the major) contributing factor to the sound of the finished cartridge.  I guess the magnets and mountings also contribute but I'm still surprised how different these cartridges sound. 

Certainly the diamond/cantilever/coils are a major part of the sound of the cartridge.  But there are two important things to consider here.  One is that the cartridge body materials, how they are assembled, the magnets and the fine adjustments made by the master cartridge makers all play a part.  To give a couple examples, Lyra claims a proprietary technique for mounting the assembly to the body, done by hand by Yoshinori Mishima.  They also designed a suspension system that compensates for the tracking force to have the coils and the magnetic structure perfectly aligned when the stylus is in the groove at the proper tracking force.  When I read about this design I thought for sure somebody else must have thought of it but they have patented it, nobody has claimed it was not original and Linn also notes it as an advantage of the Kandid design.  Another important thing to realize is that Ogura will make the assemblies whatever way they are requested to.  Most of the coils in the Koetsu ranges are silver plated copper, except the lower few models.  Lyra and Linn use pure copper.  The companies use various profile diamonds on various models, coil formers can differ, cantilever lengths differ, etc.  So even the Ogura made parts can be quite different from one cartridge to the next.  Combine that with the differences in suspension, body materials and shapes, system of mounting the cartridge to the headshell, magnetic materials and how those are mounted to the body and you have room for a lot of variation in sound.  That is compounded by different sonic goals of the different designers involved.  So, yeah, they can sound quite different.

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I’m sure I don’t know what was done differently.
What I noticed during the assembly, however, was that the cable lugs of the Kandid can be slid more easily onto the contacts of the EkosSE/1. But they are by no means loose. I guess they sit more precisely and therefore more flat on the contacts. I checked with a friend. He also noticed this during the assembly of the Kandid.

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