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mains cable/kettle lead. Make any difference in sound quality?


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390 quid,  audioemotion had one at 895 recently 

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8 hours ago, Blzebub said:

Is there any other arena of consumer electronics (outside of hi-fi) where replacing the supplied mains lead is even a thing?

I think it's all BS, personally.

Well you’re missing something. There’s probably no other arena so sensitive to noise, certainly not military grade or whatever.

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10 hours ago, tuga said:

It looks like another good candidate for a filtering cable.

Construction-wise it looks like they're using the best possible materials and topology to address potential issues (LCR, DA, RFI/EMI) and only 3 conductors (2 & earth) which is all that's necessary, not 5 like some other dust-throwing manufacturers (e.g. Nordost). And a filter. For £1,800.

I'm still left with a lot of questions...

Is RFI/EMI rejection and/or containment needed in normal domestic conditions; if not, which conditions require this and does one's system qualify?

Does a piece of equipment need such a filter in the first place?

Can you tell by listening alone?

Does the price/performance ratio justify the cost or would one would be better off investing elsewhere on the system?

SyncroCut.png

These aren’t questions though, are they? They’re assertions structured as questions. You already know your answers.

Let me give you mine: 

-yes, usually

- I’m not sure filter is the right description. Whatever, it’s rarely about just one piece of equipment. (The noise from) any one mains cables does not affect only the sound of the component to which it is connected.

- yes. If you can’t hear a difference, dont bother

- in most cases, yes. I’ve never spent more than £100 on a mains cable, and I’m not sure what that would buy me in component terms. Most people don’t spend £mega. If you do, you’d better make sure the rest of your system is top notch... and even then I’d question your sanity. It’s a power cable. Buy shielded. End of.

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9 hours ago, Blzebub said:

Is there any other arena of consumer electronics (outside of hi-fi) where replacing the supplied mains lead is even a thing?

I think it's all BS, personally.

Medical? Research labs?

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Going back to the IsoTek Syncro, you can buy a good dc filter for less than 100 quid, also what if your mains does not have a dc problem, will this degrade the sound?  Only something I read on another forum about dc blockers.

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8 hours ago, hifinutt said:

390 quid

That would be my second most expensive audio purchase, if I bought it. Second only to music first preamp. So no not for me! I'll stick with kettle leads!

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10 hours ago, tuga said:

Medical? Research labs?

Nope.

The placebo effect is so strong in humans that we have to include placebos in drug trials. Just being told by a doctor that the pills will make you better, makes people better, even if there is no active drug in the pills.

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9 minutes ago, Blzebub said:

Nope.

The placebo effect is so strong in humans that we have to include placebos in drug trials. Just being told by a doctor that the pills will make you better, makes people better, even if there is no active drug in the pills.

I was talking about instrumentation requirements. So measurable effects.

 I know about clinical trials, my wife’s a PI at the JR

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15 minutes ago, Blzebub said:

Nope.

The placebo effect is so strong in humans that we have to include placebos in drug trials. Just being told by a doctor that the pills will make you better, makes people better, even if there is no active drug in the pills.

The so called ‘placebo effect’ in an audio listening context has no connection with the observed medical effect of the same name that you describe.

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1 minute ago, rdale said:

The so called ‘placebo effect’ in an audio listening context has no connection with the observed medical effect of the same name that you describe.

Of course it does.

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9 minutes ago, tuga said:

I was talking about instrumentation requirements. So measurable effects.

 I know about clinical trials, my wife’s a PI at the JR

I was a Clinical Research Fellow at a very well-known research establishment in London for four years. We didn't use aftermarket mains leads on any equipment.

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7 minutes ago, Blzebub said:

I was a Clinical Research Fellow at a very well-known research establishment in London for four years. We didn't use aftermarket mains leads on any equipment.

It depends on the research I suppose. Meanwell medical PSUs come with a ferrite bead, and Supra supposedly sells medical grade cables, and I’ve seen medical grade network filters too.

A friend works at the Diamond cyclotron analysing tiny particles, not sure about cables but the vibration control is of massive importance.

I am all for fitness for purpose, over engineering doesn’t hurt to have (only your pocket) but it’s not likely to bring any improvement either... It’s like owning a GT3 racing Porsche do drive around town

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Posted (edited)
18 minutes ago, Blzebub said:

I was a Clinical Research Fellow at a very well-known research establishment in London for four years. We didn't use aftermarket mains leads on any equipment.

Well, case proven then!

Out of interest, how did it sound?

Edited by Griff500
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21 minutes ago, rdale said:

The so called ‘placebo effect’ in an audio listening context has no connection with the observed medical effect of the same name that you describe.

It depends on who is (mis)using the term.

Placebo effect, however, can be applied to numerous situations with exactly the same implied meaning: people perceiving an effect when in reality, nothing has changed.

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15 minutes ago, Blzebub said:

Of course it does.

There is no audio equivalent of taking a fake pill which you believe will make you better, actually having a measurable effect in making you better.
 

When used in an audio context it is just a cheap put down, and equivalent to saying that even experienced listeners imagine there are differences which don’t exist because they always expect them to exist.

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