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Ok, here’s the last word on audio reproduction.


PeteVid
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All Hi Fi forums can close down now, we’ve got there

https://aestheticsforbirds.com/2021/04/07/an-audio-professionals-take-on-vinyl/

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Christ. Can't you give us a precis?

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Yes he thinks digital is great and gives analogies that show he does not know what is analogue and what is digital. Thereby weakening his argument.

As you were, no new insight here.

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14 minutes ago, lazycat said:

Christ. Can't you give us a precis?

Teaching Granny to suck eggs.

Very long winded way of describing recording and audio techniques.

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The warmth of a recording depends on how it was recorded?  Really I thought that it was due to cabbage or was it moussaka?  Talk about the obvious!! Really not a great article and some unhelpful generalisations.  

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I thought this was going to be either an ultimate system or even amplifier you have no idea how disappointed I was. Not worth wading through the dross:yeah:

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I use CDs and LPs - this article made my ramblings seem compact .. anyway he misses the point that some of us have where we undeniably USUALLY prefer vinyl to CD -

He says "So is analog better than digital? Does a record sound better than an MP3 or a CD? The answer is not an easy one. The story is much simpler, however, if we embrace the idea I suggested at the beginning of this piece, namely that the playback of audio recording is the product of a long series transformations. We can accept that a musical performance was transformed through many processing steps to create a master recording. In general, the analog transformation steps add distortion, which many people find pleasant, and the digital transformation steps add very little distortion,"

His omission was - what master tapes were used to convert the analogue recordings of the past into digital. 

From my purchases of AAD CDs of LPs I already had in my collection, invariably the LP sounds better .. because the record companies to make a fast buck took any old tapes and converted them to digital with little care (it would seem).  There are exceptions, notably George Martin's work on the Beatles catelogue where he obviously paid meticulous care as to the digitisation process to ensure brilliant results.  I rarely pull out a vinyl copy of Beatles stuff to play on the hifi as the CDs sound great.  Other artists the CDs can be an utter disappointment.   Of course the other problem with vinyl is at what age was the stamper when the pressing was made .. I have bought replacement LPs where albums had been damaged or scratched in the past only to find the replacement sounded worse than the original pressing.

So I am in the camp where I believe some albums sound better on vinyl than they do on a digital medium but I am not a one foot in one camp person as I have lots of CDs I love and did not feel the need or want to rush out and get a vinyl pressing.  

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The problem with cds is most are mastered for cars rather than

HiFi systems. A lot are poor quality, in theory digital should be better but often is not. But then I would not buy LPS that are digitally mastered. 

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Better last words than "argh that was the high voltage line" though.

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On the subject of analogue mastering there is an interesting recent Darko Audio podcast where he interviews a mastering engineer. He said almost all recently recorded music is recorded digitally. When creating an analogue master he takes this puts it through a DAC then masters in the analogue domain using an analogue desk / effects. This is then sent through a ADC to a finished digital file since almost all current cutting lathes take digital input files. 

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I read up to the point of 'analogue is warm' and gave up at that point. Another stupid and incorrect generalisation.

Valve amps are all 'warm'. Vinyl is 'warm'. Not bloody here it isn't.

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Sometimes vinyl sounds better than CD. 

Sometimes CD is better than vinyl.

Sometimes a valve amp sounds warm.

Sometimes a valve amp sounds neutral, or even cold.

Mastering, production, amplifier design makes the biggest difference.

Not all curries are hot. Fried eggs are hot if you put a load of chilli flakes on the top.

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13 hours ago, mtbmarkymark said:

On the subject of analogue mastering there is an interesting recent Darko Audio podcast where he interviews a mastering engineer. He said almost all recently recorded music is recorded digitally. When creating an analogue master he takes this puts it through a DAC then masters in the analogue domain using an analogue desk / effects. This is then sent through a ADC to a finished digital file since almost all current cutting lathes take digital input files. 

Mastering in digital or analogue depends on what is required. Most mastering suites have both options. 

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6 hours ago, DomT said:

Mastering in digital or analogue depends on what is required. Most mastering suites have both options. 

Most LPs mastered since 1976 have been fed through a digital delay line to the cutter heads. This avoids the maintenance on the special two head tape machines required prior to this. It is still possible to get analogue tapes mastered on a two head machine, but I believe this is a rarely available option.

This means to be sure of a truly analogue LP, you need ones pressed before 1976.

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1 hour ago, bigfool1956 said:

Most LPs mastered since 1976 have been fed through a digital delay line to the cutter heads. This avoids the maintenance on the special two head tape machines required prior to this. It is still possible to get analogue tapes mastered on a two head machine, but I believe this is a rarely available option.

This means to be sure of a truly analogue LP, you need ones pressed before 1976.

What I was referring to was the actual mastering equipment that is used not what it was recorded on. Sorry it was not clear.
 

These days mastering suites typically have digital or analogue mastering tools depending on what it required. It’s not a simple to say that using an analogue compressor will improve a digital recording etc. Each album to be mastered has its own unique requirements.

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