Jump to content

Synology NAS transfer DS212+ to DS220+: hand-holding required


Recommended Posts

On the back of some hugely helpful posts here by @SnapperMike@JensA @Solanum and others ...

... I've bought to replace my DS212+ and its 2x WD Red 3TB drives:

  • a DS220+ and 2x WD Red 10TB
  • a WD MyBook Duo with 2x WD Red 6TB

oh, and I already own a 3TB WD MyPassport drive which I've yet to use.

The DS220+ and 2x 10TB in RAID 1 (mirrored) will be my main NAS, primarily for Music but also containing some documents and images.

The DS212+ will take 2x 6TB in RAID 0 and act as offsite (in my wifi-enabled outbuilding c.50m from house) backup for the DS220+. It will also take over as Time Machine backup destination for all house computers.

The MyBook Duo will take my 2x 3TB drives and go to Kendal. If I can be bothered, I'll update it every 6 months or so with my music collection for use when I'm there.

Despite, or perhaps because of, a career in what is from the outside described as "IT", the prospect fills me with dread. Ok, and a little excitement at the prospect of learning something. So I'm going to take this a step at a time and would appreciate the guidance of those who have walked this path before me.

Proposed step 1 to follow in next post.

Thanks for being there.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 44
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Thanks folks. I am pleased to report that I have a huge chunk of music on my NTFS-formatted MyPassport drive. I've reconnected to complete the process. It takes far longer than I expected but see

Apologies to @jamesrfisher who I also should have tagged for the NTFS suggestion. Awesome, dude, as they say in... actually, where do they say that?

Brilliant. Usbshare1-2 it is. Let me give that a shot tomorrow. Crikey, what a forum. It has, you know, like experts and stuff.

Posted Images

Step 1 should, I think, be to take a copy of everything on my Synology DS212+ onto my WD MyPassport. This is currently formatted as exFAT but can be any format required.

What's the fastest way of copying my contents across? Physically attach the MyPassport to the DS212+ and use USB Copy? I'd prefer not to use HyperBackup, if I understand correctly, as I'd rather be able to access (if required) my files from the MyPassport than to have to restore them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Step 2 is to copy all my music files from DS212+ to DS220+. 

I guess the answer to “how” is as above but enlighten me if not.

 I then need to mount the drive as one of my Mac login items and change the path on iTunes, which I use to upload my music, to point to 220+ instead of 212+. 

It will be a relief when this piece is “live”!

 Thanks 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, TheFlash said:

Step 1 should, I think, be to take a copy of everything on my Synology DS212+ onto my WD MyPassport. This is currently formatted as exFAT but can be any format required.

What's the fastest way of copying my contents across? Physically attach the MyPassport to the DS212+ and use USB Copy? 

Yes, always a good idea to do a full backup before any migration just in case.  In fact, I recommend doing two and putting one in the safe / sock drawer.  If you do make a mistake (like accidentally formatting the wrong drive - easily done) then you still have a spare backup.  It's not wasteful because once it is all set up you can start rotating your backup drives, which is good practice.

USB Copy will work to make the backup.  exFAT needs a licence which costs £3.99 (search exFAT in package center).  May be less hassle just to reformat the drive using FAT32 (if none of your files are above 4GB) or NTFS.

10 hours ago, TheFlash said:

Step 2 is to copy all my music files from DS212+ to DS220+. 

I guess the answer to “how” is as above but enlighten me if not.

There are several methods to achieve this:

https://www.synology.com/en-uk/knowledgebase/DSM/tutorial/Backup/How_to_migrate_between_Synology_NAS_DSM_6_0_and_later

The simplest might be to try Migration Assistant.

Failing that, back up the old NAS configuration and then restore it on the new one.   You can copy the files back in using Hyper Backup or the USB drive.

Instructions in that link above using Hyper Backup - just use common sense to replace that step with restoring using USB Copy if that's the method you decide.

Quote

 I then need to mount the drive as one of my Mac login items and change the path on iTunes, which I use to upload my music, to point to 220+ instead of 212+. 

If you are decommissioning the old NAS, then just set the new one up with the same system and share name.  Shouldn't then need to change.  
If you have changed it, then you just need to load in the new iTunes library by opening iTunes with the Shift key held down: https://support.apple.com/en-gb/guide/itunes/itns3259/windows

Quote

It will be a relief when this piece is “live”!

Good luck :)  Remember as long as you a spare backup drive in your safe / sock drawer then you can't go wrong. 

Chris

Edited by jamster
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers Chris. I'm kicking off step 1!

I will not be decommissioning the DS212+, I'll be using for offsite backup on same network so will need to sort my naming to differentiate between NAS's. All in good time.

Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, jamster said:

Yes, always a good idea to do a full backup before any migration just in case.  In fact, I recommend doing two and putting one in the safe / sock drawer.  If you do make a mistake (like accidentally formatting the wrong drive - easily done) then you still have a spare backup.  It's not wasteful because once it is all set up you can start rotating your backup drives, which is good practice.

USB Copy will work to make the backup.  exFAT needs a licence which costs £3.99 (search exFAT in package center).  May be less hassle just to reformat the drive using FAT32 (if none of your files are above 4GB) or NTFS.

There are several methods to achieve this:

https://www.synology.com/en-uk/knowledgebase/DSM/tutorial/Backup/How_to_migrate_between_Synology_NAS_DSM_6_0_and_later

The simplest might be to try Migration Assistant.

Failing that, back up the old NAS configuration and then restore it on the new one.   You can copy the files back in using Hyper Backup or the USB drive.

Instructions in that link above using Hyper Backup - just use common sense to replace that step with restoring using USB Copy if that's the method you decide.

If you are decommissioning the old NAS, then just set the new one up with the same system and share name.  Shouldn't then need to change.  
If you have changed it, then you just need to load in the new iTunes library by opening iTunes with the Shift key held down: https://support.apple.com/en-gb/guide/itunes/itns3259/windows

Good luck :)  Remember as long as you a spare backup drive in your safe / sock drawer then you can't go wrong. 

Chris

This all sounds like great advice from @jamster. @TheFlash It sounds as though you have thought everything through in great detail. I'm sure following jamster's suggestions above will prove to be successful. Go for it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers Mike.

If I can Step 1 to execute that would be an encouraging start!

WD My Passport reformatted as FAT32, usbshares recognised but nothing happening

1613754023_Screenshot2021-05-03at10_03_43.thumb.png.603bde3cc5cb40fd626187442b359528.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Aha, discovered the Copy button... I wondered what that did :doh:

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

2036848918_Screenshot2021-05-03at10_28_48.thumb.png.9576cd752811f572974322d0fab3eae4.png

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I'm certainly no I.T. expert, and I've only had my DS200+ for a few months, and still lot's to learn. The easiest option I've so far found was maybe once a month connect up my various back up media ( my NAS drive usually get's my ripped music straight from source). That obviously depends on the amount of new material you have each month and the time that would take.

I'd also draw your attention to this thread, although this specifically relates to QNAP drives, it's only a matter of time before they make an attempt for Synology drives . Just make sure  you have everything up to date, lock down your drive with enough security settings, employ the anti-virus programme  and disable the admin log in. 

Edited by d88
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, d88 said:

II'm certainly no I.T. expert, and I've only had my DS200+ for a few months, so still lot's to learn, the easiest option I've so far found was maybe once a month connect up a spare drive to the NAS unit and just copy over. That obviously depends on the amount of new material you have each month and the time that would take.

I'd also draw your attention to this thread, although this specifically relates to QNAP drives, it's only a matter of time before they make a try for Synology ones . Just make sure  you have everything up to date, lock down your drive with enough security settings, employ the anti-virus programme  and disable the admin log in. 

Very good advice @d88. I am back to normal thanks to my backup and have implemented all possible security measures on my NAS. One thing I stopped, was my scheduled backup. I have an old HP Prolient micro server that switches its self on once a week and does a mirror backup of my NAS. Had I not noticed the corrupt files and stopped the scheduled back up, my backup would have been overwritten with the corrupt (ransom ware attacked) files and I would have been in trouble. So the moral is, make sure the files you are backing up are your original files. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

All my fears are coming true. My career "in IT" combined with a dread of actual IT: a match made in heaven.

Formatting the MyPassport in FAT32 limited the available space which got consumed to the point where the disk was reported as full; so I reformatted as exFAT (I had already bought the capability).

I went out for a few hours this afternoon. When I came back, music files I recognised were still being copied. Very encouraging. I then got a message saying the target drive was full, which it can't be. And then other messages about the process being stopped. And some unusual meesages about the diskstation closing down yet it didn't...

I ejected the disk properly and have connected it to the Macbook on which I now type. Screenshot attached. I don't appear to have any music files on the drive.

I'm on the verge of either (a) giving up and sticking with what I had or (b) finding a man/woman who can do my series of changes for me and paying for the privilege. Sometimes life really does feel too short.

2106563023_Screenshot2021-05-03at20_02_05.thumb.png.79bb1c7c23b3a4a3e9f84318ff4ee037.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Billz said:

Very good advice @d88. I am back to normal thanks to my backup and have implemented all possible security measures on my NAS. One thing I stopped, was my scheduled backup. I have an old HP Prolient micro server that switches its self on once a week and does a mirror backup of my NAS. Had I not noticed the corrupt files and stopped the scheduled back up, my backup would have been overwritten with the corrupt (ransom ware attacked) files and I would have been in trouble. So the moral is, make sure the files you are backing up are your original files. 

That's good to hear your back to normal Billz. I fully understand the convenience and the ability to store, save and backup at the same time with different media, however, I took the approach from the outset not to use my NAS drive as my source of doing this for various reasons, and one of them was security. When I rip a file, I will then send the original ripped file from the source,  to my various media backups directly. That way I can be sure it's a direct copy from the source and in theory I'm never dependent solely on my NAS drive or other media back up. If I find an issue I can compare independently from at least two seperate sources that have come from the original rip. 

OP - unfortunately  I can't give any real practical advice, however, did you check the disk capacity after formatting it and did you check the size of the music folder you were transferring over ? (apologies if you've covered this previously).

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, d88 said:

OP - unfortunately  I can't give any real practical advice, however, did you check the disk capacity after formatting it and did you check the size of the music folder you were transferring over ? (apologies if you've covered this previously).

Yes. My total capacity on NAS is 3TB and my USB drive is 3TB (and was showing same on DSM). I was copying only the Music folder, not photos or other docs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

With large drives FAT or exFAT is very inefficent on disk usage. This is because FAT has a limited number of address blocks so it divides the drive into larger  chunks to match its address tables. Net result is the minimum file size is bigger. That is why you have run out of space.

The drive should be formatted as ext4 for a Linux box usage or NTFS for a windows box. NTFS is read only for Apple .

But the drive you are formatting is just a USB drive for backup / transfer to the new machine? In that case I would use NTFS.

My server is a Vortexbox running Fedora 25 ie Linux. It's  backup routine is to a USB drive which it formats in NTFS format.

Edited by slavedata
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...