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I have recently embarked on going through Peter Gabriel's catalogued career starting with the first Genesis album. I just listened to "Foxtrot." I have multiple copies from different countries of the Genesis albums (LPs) from the first through "Lamb Lies Down on Broadway" and beyond.

I've been determining which copy of which album sounds the best. I'm doing this for obvious reasons as I want to listen to the most enjoyable music. What I just realized is that I'm tuning my hifi at a level that hadn't occurred to me before. My system really does provide a higher level of access to the recordings. I'm thinking there are some of you out there who have experienced this and are also enjoying their systems by really getting in touch with the music so intimately.

Cheers,

Michael

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I can relate.  Over time I have acquired several family record collections resulting in duplicate versions of LPs. I began cataloging the combined collection at the start of the pandemic (time on my hands).  I listened to the duplicates to determine which ones went into the main collection. Some pairs/triplets were different pressings made around the same time, some were original pressings versus reissues, some were original mono versus later stereo.  The LP12 always revealed differences and clear winners - earlier pressings>later ones, original stereo>original mono, original mono>later stereo, heavier vinyl>flimsy vinyl.  For me there has been one downside to this.  The LP12 presents such a wealth of information/music that I sometimes find myself focused on the engineering/mix to the detriment of the musical message. That's no fault of the table, just something I must overcome.

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Perhaps covered in detail elsewhere but I'll mention that I've been setting a pair of Keltiks (new install) and I've used a few Peter Gabriel songs (CD) and listened repeatedly to them while adjusting crossover settings and speaker locations. I put on the same song from the LP (USA LP from the original release date period) and the lack of separation vs. the CD was vast, completely changing the locations and the overall perspective of the instruments and voice.

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17 hours ago, Jazz Kisaten said:

I can relate.  Over time I have acquired several family record collections resulting in duplicate versions of LPs. I began cataloging the combined collection at the start of the pandemic (time on my hands).  I listened to the duplicates to determine which ones went into the main collection. Some pairs/triplets were different pressings made around the same time, some were original pressings versus reissues, some were original mono versus later stereo.  The LP12 always revealed differences and clear winners - earlier pressings>later ones, original stereo>original mono, original mono>later stereo, heavier vinyl>flimsy vinyl.  For me there has been one downside to this.  The LP12 presents such a wealth of information/music that I sometimes find myself focused on the engineering/mix to the detriment of the musical message. That's no fault of the table, just something I must overcome.

Thank for the reply. Yes, I think you get it. It occurs like another level up when you just hear the music and the recording, and the hifi system just becomes transparent. I had the experience last night listening to Genesis, "Selling England by the Pound." The recording and pressing were so good. I was listening and noticed how at ease I was. That was not my system creating that ease, but rather the system getting out of the way and revealing the quality of the recording. Of course it only occurs that way. We know what the system is doing.

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6 hours ago, akamatsu said:

Thank for the reply. Yes, I think you get it. It occurs like another level up when you just hear the music and the recording, and the hifi system just becomes transparent. I had the experience last night listening to Genesis, "Selling England by the Pound." The recording and pressing were so good. I was listening and noticed how at ease I was. That was not my system creating that ease, but rather the system getting out of the way and revealing the quality of the recording. Of course it only occurs that way. We know what the system is doing.

Yep, the system is always the best when you lose awareness of the equipment and just become lost in the music.  That capability of a system has nothing to do with price IME but happens when quality components are well matched and well setup.

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Posted (edited)
20 hours ago, ThomasOK said:

Yep, the system is always the best when you lose awareness of the equipment and just become lost in the music.  That capability of a system has nothing to do with price IME but happens when quality components are well matched and well setup.

I can go back decades in my memory and recall modest systems curated and set up well that just made music. They all had turntables.

Edited by akamatsu
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akamatsu, if you're going through Gabriel's career and including the Genesis stuff, does this mean you're anti- Trick of the Tail and all Genesis that comes after?   I guess what I'm asking is: what is your Genesis cut-off point?

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Just now, wildwildWes said:

akamatsu, if you're going through Gabriel's career and including the Genesis stuff, does this mean you're anti- Trick of the Tail and all Genesis that comes after?   I guess what I'm asking is: what is your Genesis cut-off point?

If I had to pick a cut-off point, it would be "Duke." I have Abacab, but it occurs as a little too "pop" these days. Trick of the Tail and Wind and Wuthering were two of my favourite albums years ago. As I said elsewhere, I'll circle back to these after I'm done with the Peter Gabriel stuff. It could be a while, but I have most of it on 45 rpm remasters, so it should go a little faster. :D

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I noticed that my best copies of "Selling England by the Pound" and "The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway" have a blue Charisma label. So I poked around on the web and found this article. It appears that blue means UK reissue, probably late 1970s. They sound superb.

http://www.cvinyl.com/labelguides/charisma.php

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Get in the zone.....  put on "Fly on a WIndshield", crank up the volume, sit back and wait for it!!!

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9 minutes ago, sktn77a said:

Get in the zone.....  put on "Fly on a WIndshield", crank up the volume, sit back and wait for it!!!

Will do! I think I know to what bit you are referring. Volume will be cranked!

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  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Having not touched SO2 for about half a year+ now, I eventually read all pages of this thread, and asked myself, what if?

In a momentary lapse of reason, and so much distance over time, I decided against the slow step by step approach, and favoured a dramatic change of events. Thus, I set all absorption values to 0, and preference to the default of 80/20. With the new profile calculated I listened the rest of yesterday's evening. And concluded it this morning.

"Better, or worse?", as the optometrist is used to ask.

Switching back I must say, that my original setting, derived after hours of stepwise adjustments yields the better SQ. Voices and instrumentts sounds more detailed, with more texture - which leeds to more emotional involvement of this listener.

I also noticed in this thread, how different building standards in our locales are. Maybe, it can be attributed to this factor, that what works there, don't neccessarily works here.

I'll leave it at my original settings. Maybe that's indiscipline regarding Linn's recommendations, but I can only shout: I like it! 😉

Edited by TooManyCatweazles
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On 29/05/2021 at 02:53, TooManyCatweazles said:

Having not touched SO2 for about half a year+ now, I eventually read all pages of this thread, and asked myself, what if?

In a momentary lapse of reason, and so much distance over time, I decided against the slow step by step approach, and favoured a dramatic change of events. Thus, I set all absorption values to 0, and preference to the default of 80/20. With the new profile calculated I listened the rest of yesterday's evening. And concluded it this morning.

"Better, or worse?", as the optometrist is used to ask.

Switching back I must say, that my original setting, derived after hours of stepwise adjustments yields the better SQ. Voices and instrumentts sounds more detailed, with more texture - which leeds to more emotional involvement of this listener.

I also noticed in this thread, how different building standards in our locales are. Maybe, it can be attributed to this factor, that what works there, don't neccessarily works here.

I'll leave it at my original settings. Maybe that's indiscipline regarding Linn's recommendations, but I can only shout: I like it! 😉

My anti-skate was off and re-measured the VTF (was off by .05!) Saw a Linn video where they were measuring w an electronic gauge. Had been doing it for years w the mat off.  But now sounds great!   Celebrated with a record that I was the first in Brooklyn NY to buy!  

IMG_1630.jpeg

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17 hours ago, mskaye said:

Celebrated with a record that I was the first in Brooklyn NY to buy!  

Nice choice! I was a big Mott the Hoople fan in the mid 1970s. One of their best albums. I was at SXSW in Austin, Texas about 15 years ago and saw a free outdoor concert by Ian Hunter. It was a dream come true as he performed a few Mott the Hoople songs.

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Posted (edited)
On 31/05/2021 at 02:04, mskaye said:

Saw a Linn video where they were measuring w an electronic gauge. Had been doing it for years w the mat off.

Which brings us to the question, how much the TF changes due to the mat. It should depend on the arm's method to create TF. When it's done by a spring like with most Linn arms, I'd expect TF to be slightly higher with the mat. If it's created by mass like with Naim Aro, I would not expect a difference. But measurement is always better than speculation. And as the history of science tells us: you can always rule out unexpected results as measurement errors when you haven't understood what you're measuring 🙈

Edited by TooManyCatweazles
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