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CD's are they dead? Do they just smell a little? or are they the invention and bargain of the century?


hiesteem
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8 hours ago, Tony T said:

I am buying CDs quite regularly, mainly from eBay and mainly second hand. I am not meant to be doing it and it’s been half term so the boss has been at home, (she works at the school btw, she doesn’t attend in case it crossed your minds) luckily I didn’t order anything in the last few weeks so all is still cool. I do worry about getting caught but I reckon she can’t tell if I’m adding stuff to my collection in a similar vein to if she was buying shoes  or clothes on the sly, would I notice? No, I don’t think I would, life’s just too short and It’s not sexism either, it’s a fact.

Don't get caught Tony , you might get lines:sos:

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If you buy a ton of CDs from a charity shop, rip them and then donate them back to the charity shop that's illegal as you don't own the originals? Even though you were never the original owner and the artist has never, and never will make a penny from that CD again. I understand it bit think it's strange too.

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39 minutes ago, Joss said:

If you buy a ton of CDs from a charity shop, rip them and then donate them back to the charity shop that's illegal as you don't own the originals? Even though you were never the original owner and the artist has never, and never will make a penny from that CD again. I understand it bit think it's strange too.

If one used CD effectively becomes multiple digital copies that are 'owned'/used simultaneously then arguably this reduces the chances of someone paying for a version that the artist would make some money from. The other part of the legal logic of course is to disuade people from simply sharing copies of the ripped files (as was extremely common pre-streaming).

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12 minutes ago, MartinC said:

If one used CD effectively becomes multiple digital copies that are 'owned'/used simultaneously then arguably this reduces the chances of someone paying for a version that the artist would make some money from. The other part of the legal logic of course is to disuade people from simply sharing copies of the ripped files (as was extremely common pre-streaming).

I totally get the reasoning, it makes sense about other people not buying copies. I can imagine a good percentage of people don't own the original discs for all the music they have stored away on hard drives though. I wonder if anyone has ever been prosecuted.

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11 hours ago, Joss said:

I totally get the reasoning, it makes sense about other people not buying copies. I can imagine a good percentage of people don't own the original discs for all the music they have stored away on hard drives though. I wonder if anyone has ever been prosecuted.

In the UK no there has never been any prosecution for this type of action . In the US I think there may of been but I am not sure what the result of it was.

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Even in America successful prosecutions have been about file sharing and/or public performances using ripped music. The case that springs to mind is in Minnesota, but there has been a few others.   

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Well, these Humble pie discs I just picked up should be prosecuted. They are so WICKED!!!  Absolutely OUTRAGEOUS!!!!

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