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Place of the artists in the streaming way ?


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58 minutes ago, Chris 1970 said:

You are right… it's the new world.

But if recording music is the poor part of the diptyque album/live, recording studios will die too.

Then, how do you record jazz, classic, world, rock band, and even sophisticated electro… – in fact all but an artist locked in a closet – without a sound engineer, a mixing table, multiple different mics, elaborate connections, and… a great AD converter ?

I love albums in the "locked in a closet" way, some are brillant and in my favorite list. But this way can't be all the music; and for the artist, the unique way to explore… What about a saxophone there, what about an orchestral arrangement, what about the beauty of a real bass… ?

For example, in pop music, could the omnipresent Auto-tune be a lake of sound engineering in the first place ? Not just a style thing that will pass.

We all know theses stories of bands in studio for one year… or just one week of live recording to make a Masterpiece.
Without sound engineering, how do you do ?

well, I think they'll still need a studio as they need recorded music to sell the tickets. 

re the classical music: in my view, we live in a great times when it comes to high quality recordings. most of it is recorded in concert halls. 

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I love the story of MC Hammer when he was starting out. He was offered a record contract and turned it down. He said he could do better selling CDs out of the trunk (boot) of his car. :)

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1 hour ago, Paulssurround said:

When most of us were growing up, there were no personal computers, smart phones, video games or streaming

All we had was music on vinyl or radio.

‘I think music was more profitable for most musicians back then, and a single “hit” could be extremely lucrative and life changing for fame and fortune.

The smart money was often with rock groups that funded their own concert tours, and fortunes were made from royalties and concert ticket sales

Nowadays, I have no idea what the business model is?

Unfortunately the good old days weren't actually the good old days for artists.  The greed of the record labels and music publishers (where the real money often is) created a system where many artists who were huge hits were actually broke.  This article talks about the situation with Tom Petty and the unique for the time way he dealt with it.

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/tom-petty-defies-his-record-label-and-files-for-bankruptcy

This happened to more musicians than you would think.  The realization that they were being ripped off by the big labels is what lead to people like The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, King Crimson, The Rolling Stones and others to create their own record labels.  When Robert Fripp founded his record label, Discipline Global Mobile in 1992, he said "DGM has aimed to be "a model of ethical business in an industry founded on exploitation, oiled by deceit, riven with theft and fueled by greed."  Hmmm.

If you haven't seen it I would also highly recommend watching the movie "Standing in the Shadows of Motown".  It is a fantastic movie about the unsung musicians who were the backbone, and in most cases the musical genius, behind the Motown Sound.  As such they were responsible for more hits that The Beatles, The Stones and Elvis put together!  Yet most of them remained underpaid and relatively unknown, musical masters playing in piano bars, etc., until this movie came out.

I fully agree that the big record companies (and they are bigger than ever) are screwing over the musicians, but they always have been.  They are also screwing over the buying public by trying to see how many times they can get you to pay for the same music.  Plus, in order for them to not pay the musicians any substantial amount for their work we get to pay huge ticket prices for concerts so the musicians can make some money.  The one good thing with the electronification of music is that talented people can create wonderful music without the need for the big record companies and they can get it out there without them as well.  I think (and hope) in the long run the big media will find it has become obsolete and has been replaced by a more democratic music distribution system.  We will see.  In the meantime I will continue to buy LPs from musicians I like, including newer ones like Rodrigo y Gabriella and Khruangbin, and will buy them from the artists' site when available.

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1 hour ago, ThomasOK said:

If you haven't seen it I would also highly recommend watching the movie "Standing in the Shadows of Motown".

Seen it. Recommend it as well. I just checked and my DVD copy seems to have not survived the move from Austin to Point Roberts. :S

Okay, I just checked and it is available for free on Amazon Prime. :)

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17 hours ago, ThomasOK said:

If you haven't seen it I would also highly recommend watching the movie "Standing in the Shadows of Motown". 

Good tip. I will try to find it. Amazon Prime, I hope that is also here in the Netherlands. 

I once saw a film about studio musicians that laid the basis of many well known pop song. They were called the wrecking crew. See https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1185418/

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20 hours ago, ThomasOK said:

Unfortunately the good old days weren't actually the good old days for artists.  The greed of the record labels and music publishers (where the real money often is) created a system where many artists who were huge hits were actually broke.  This article talks about the situation with Tom Petty and the unique for the time way he dealt with it.

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/tom-petty-defies-his-record-label-and-files-for-bankruptcy

This happened to more musicians than you would think.  The realization that they were being ripped off by the big labels is what lead to people like The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, King Crimson, The Rolling Stones and others to create their own record labels.  When Robert Fripp founded his record label, Discipline Global Mobile in 1992, he said "DGM has aimed to be "a model of ethical business in an industry founded on exploitation, oiled by deceit, riven with theft and fueled by greed."  Hmmm.

If you haven't seen it I would also highly recommend watching the movie "Standing in the Shadows of Motown".  It is a fantastic movie about the unsung musicians who were the backbone, and in most cases the musical genius, behind the Motown Sound.  As such they were responsible for more hits that The Beatles, The Stones and Elvis put together!  Yet most of them remained underpaid and relatively unknown, musical masters playing in piano bars, etc., until this movie came out.

I fully agree that the big record companies (and they are bigger than ever) are screwing over the musicians, but they always have been.  They are also screwing over the buying public by trying to see how many times they can get you to pay for the same music.  Plus, in order for them to not pay the musicians any substantial amount for their work we get to pay huge ticket prices for concerts so the musicians can make some money.  The one good thing with the electronification of music is that talented people can create wonderful music without the need for the big record companies and they can get it out there without them as well.  I think (and hope) in the long run the big media will find it has become obsolete and has been replaced by a more democratic music distribution system.  We will see.  In the meantime I will continue to buy LPs from musicians I like, including newer ones like Rodrigo y Gabriella and Khruangbin, and will buy them from the artists' site when available.

Thanks Thomas

Great post

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4 hours ago, dikki said:

Good tip. I will try to find it. Amazon Prime, I hope that is also here in the Netherlands. 

I once saw a film about studio musicians that laid the basis of many well known pop song. They were called the wrecking crew. See https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1185418/

Yes, another good movie in a similar vein.  The Wrecking Crew were to the West Coast much like The Funk Brothers were to Motown, the music makers behind the music in the time before the groups were expected to play their own music.  After Standing in the Shadows of Motown came out the idea caught on and similar movies came out including The Wrecking Crew.  If you like documentaries about the unsung people who were, and in some cases still are, the people often responsible for the music we love you might also want to check 20 Feet from Stardom, a movie about the backup singers and their place in the music industry.  Also Muscle Shoals about the small Alabama town that was very important in Soul, R&B and Rock and Roll from the 60s through the present day.

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4 hours ago, ThomasOK said:

Yes, another good movie in a similar vein.  The Wrecking Crew were to the West Coast much like The Funk Brothers were to Motown, the music makers behind the music in the time before the groups were expected to play their own music.  After Standing in the Shadows of Motown came out the idea caught on and similar movies came out including The Wrecking Crew.  If you like documentaries about the unsung people who were, and in some cases still are, the people often responsible for the music we love you might also want to check 20 Feet from Stardom, a movie about the backup singers and their place in the music industry.  Also Muscle Shoals about the small Alabama town that was very important in Soul, R&B and Rock and Roll from the 60s through the present day.

The Muscle Shoals documentary is fascinating. I first heard of the studio when I bought There Goes Rhymin’ Simon back in the ‘seventies as one track (at least) was recorded there, and the gatefold sleeve had a small picture of it. First time I heard of two of the Roche sisters too!

Mick

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8 minutes ago, MickC said:

The Muscle Shoals documentary is fascinating. I first heard of the studio when I bought There Goes Rhymin’ Simon back in the ‘seventies as one track (at least) was recorded there, and the gatefold sleeve had a small picture of it. First time I heard of two of the Roche sisters too!

Mick

Is that the Muscle Shoals of "Sweet Home Alabama" fame?

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12 hours ago, Andyt916 said:

Is that the Muscle Shoals of "Sweet Home Alabama" fame?

I’ve always assumed so…

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18 hours ago, Andyt916 said:

Is that the Muscle Shoals of "Sweet Home Alabama" fame?

Yes it is.  They referred to the "Swampers", the nickname for the group of musicians, in the song.

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