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Yesterday, I had a musician over to hear my Linn system. It is not his first visit to my home to hear my Linn, but he is gobsmacked by the sound quality that Linn makes

He plays his 12 guitars, piano and other instruments and has a very musical family that sings and plays professionally. He has spent a lot of time in a professional recording studio and is very familiar with recording studio techniques.

He mentioned that the only way to get this kind of sound quality for recorded music that Linn is producing, is to actually be in the studio with the musicians, if and only if they are having a good day performing together. He says there are many things that can go wrong in a studio, and it is not often that all the variables come to get the kind of sound quality that Linn is able to get.

‘When he was listening to the music I played, he would close his eyes and follow every note in his head, on the guitars and keyboards, imagining in his mind playing the instruments and exactly where he would by placing his fingers to play. He was totally immersed in the music.

‘I thought I would pass that on to all the Linn enthusiasts here.

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I had a similar experience several years ago. A friend who played in local touring bad [festivals, bars, etc.] came over and asked to hear "Nights in White Satin". Part way through, he blurted out "Holy Crap; that is the first time I have ever heard that guitar in the background. I know it is there because we play it. I have never heard that from any stereo or radio in my life". And that is the essence of Linn: to hear it all and just listen.

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On 11/09/2021 at 06:03, Eldarboy said:

I had a similar experience several years ago. A friend who played in local touring bad [festivals, bars, etc.] came over and asked to hear "Nights in White Satin". Part way through, he blurted out "Holy Crap; that is the first time I have ever heard that guitar in the background. I know it is there because we play it. I have never heard that from any stereo or radio in my life". And that is the essence of Linn: to hear it all and just listen.

It is great to get confirmation from musicians, on how our Linn systems sound, and how well they reproduce the organic sound of live instruments  

‘Linn does a fantastic job of that   😊

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Yes I have a friend who is in a well known band (in NZ at least) he has come around to listen to his mixes in my system - and I have a very modest system by comparison with many of you. Have to say he seems to get fantastic spatiality and dynamics in his recordings.  He tells me he uses magic boxes to achieve this! now where have I heard that before? He appreciates the accuracy and dynamics of a good domestic system to hear their final production. 

This is one of their earlier albums. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Killervision

He has just given me their latest album on vinyl but its still in shrink wrap as I haven't a turntable anymore.

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One of my friends in my old village, sadly desceased last year, played guitar and recorded with a number of bands mainly in the seventies. We often discussed music. He was graciously interested in my guitars, playing and home recordings. Yet, he never showed much interest in audiophile matters, aside from a preference for analogue. I get the impression that there aren't many musicians who are audiophiles. Maybe, that's just because they can't afford expensive hifi gear, but I wonder if it's also because they can reconstuct the music in their heads from a few clues and don't need a high end stereo to spell it out for them. I recall my friend's active critical listening with intense concentration to my recordings.

I find these things difficult to put into words, so I hope this doesn't come over badly. There's a detached trance like feeling that I get when listening to music is really good and all enveloping (no drugs involved). I suspect most of us have similar experiences. On rare and memorable occasions, it can be the same with playing guitar. I could tell you about a few instances of this that I can remember vividly in detail years and even decades later. For example one occasion in my garden on a still summer's evening or another during a band practice in an empty community hall. I even got it once just listening to the sound of the breeze in the trees while on holiday in Greece. A few years ago, I attended a guitar workshop conducted by an exceptional guitarist who played concerts all over the world. He asked the students if they had ever been to that place I described. Pretty well everyone there said it had happened to them, too. The guy said he went into that state a few minutes into every performance he gave and called it the lizard brain.

Edited by Newton John
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7 hours ago, Newton John said:

I get the impression that there aren't many musicians who are audiophiles. Maybe, that's just because they can't afford expensive hifi gear, but I wonder if it's also because they can reconstuct the music in their heads from a few clues and don't need a high end stereo to spell it out for them. I recall my friend's active critical listening with intense concentration to my recordings.

7 hours ago, Newton John said:

The guy said he went into that state a few minutes into every performance he gave and called it the lizard brain.

Great views 😊

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The late John Peel who helped launch the careers of many bands used to listen to music on a lo-fi system. He's reasoning was most folk would listen to his show on a less than perfect transistor radio and he wanted to make sure the sound quality was adequate for his entire audience to enjoy his shows. 

Back in 1983, Kate Bush's `The Dreaming' was digitally mastered to provide the sound she wanted. Kate was interested in production techniques and produced the album herself. Shortly after it was done, Linn approached Kate. Having heard about Kate's production interests, Linn felt it was time to demonstrate the superiority of properly handled analogue recording.

Linn said Kate was mighty impressed by their analogue-vs-digital demo, but Kate said: "I wouldn't say I was necessarily impressed by their demonstration, but yes, I feel there's an awful lot in analogue recording. We had a lot of problems working with digital for `The Dreaming' which was digitally mixed. Editing was the main one -- it was so time-consuming. Some things obviously were easier working digitally -- otherwise we wouldn't have used it. But the vast majority I reckon would have been easier on tape. Particularly as I was working with people who'd worked with tape all their life. In the end we brought in a guy who was familiar with digital equipment from classical recordings he'd worked on. And it didn't take very long after that. The problems rather put me off digital. We all felt a kind of alienation from the process of creation using it. There's something reassuring about a tape that you can see and touch. You've more trust in it somehow. There was a feeling of uneasiness about using digital that stemmed from the fact that we felt it wasn't as easy to use in many respects as tape is."

Apparently Kate listens to her music through a Naim system.  Though I did read Paul Simon uses a Linn system or, at least, has an LP12. 

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On 13/09/2021 at 17:52, Newton John said:

I get the impression that there aren't many musicians who are audiophiles.

Most musicians don't care much for typical domestic audio equipment, but I have known many who are very much what they consider "audiophiles". They are just obsessed with different things, things like pedals, loop machines, reverbs, gates, compressors, microphones, preamps, DIs, guitar, bass, and other instrument amps, synthesizers, consoles, etc. - and that is just on the electronics side of things, not even mentioning instruments and such. It is simply a different level of appreciation for the same thing, music. Some of them do own nice stereos, but most are used to studio equipment which can and does often perform better at similar price points to domestic gear.

I have heard of some big names who own expensive domestic kit but I always wonder how good it actually sounds. I highly doubt many of these names take the time (or have allowed someone else to take the time) to implement their "high end" products properly, unlike the engineers they hire for the studios they record in, which have very specific requirements in terms of noise transmission and control, acoustics, etc.

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4 hours ago, Elad Repooc said:

Most musicians don't care much for typical domestic audio equipment, but I have known many who are very much what they consider "audiophiles". They are just obsessed with different things, things like pedals, loop machines, reverbs, gates, compressors, microphones, preamps, DIs, guitar, bass, and other instrument amps, synthesizers, consoles, etc. - and that is just on the electronics side of things, not even mentioning instruments and such. It is simply a different level of appreciation for the same thing, music. Some of them do own nice stereos, but most are used to studio equipment which can and does often perform better at similar price points to domestic gear.

I have heard of some big names who own expensive domestic kit but I always wonder how good it actually sounds. I highly doubt many of these names take the time (or have allowed someone else to take the time) to implement their "high end" products properly, unlike the engineers they hire for the studios they record in, which have very specific requirements in terms of noise transmission and control, acoustics, etc.

Yet, Alan Parsons was scathing about audiophiles describing them as people who used his records to listen to their equipment rather using their equipment to listen to his records.

Edited by Newton John
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10 minutes ago, Newton John said:

Yet, Alan Parsons was scathing about audiophiles describing them as people who used his records to listen to their equipment rather using their equipment to listen to his records.

I agree with this and it’s why I would never describe myself as an audiophile.

’troll

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5 hours ago, Elad Repooc said:

They are just obsessed with different things, things like pedals, loop machines, reverbs, gates, compressors, microphones, preamps, DIs, guitar, bass, and other instrument amps, synthesizers, consoles, etc. - and that is just on the electronics side of things, not even mentioning instruments and such. It is simply a different level of appreciation for the same thing, music.

Yes, this perfectionist and adventurous research of tweaks and sounds is important.

One of the great thing for a music lover is to catch all these details too, as it's a part of the musician signature itself.

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Quite deliberately Brian Eno chose his own hi-fi system to be of average quality so he can check-out his studio tapes on the sort of system most people will be listening to the final product on. His monitors follow the same philosophy.

"The monitors I've found appealing are Lockwood's with Tannoy Reds. I find a lot of the newer monitors with horns and whatever are very exciting to listen to but are also very tiring when you have to monitor on them for ten hours a day."

Brian also likes Eclipse single driver loudspeakers 

image.jpeg.5610640a06d831690ee4759a6186e74b.jpeg

I first heard these speakers in Mostar, (Bosnia) playing a record that I helped to produce, so I was quite familiar with the music on the record. What impressed me more than anything else was how tight the bass was and how absolutely accurate it seemed. There was no hang over of the bass. It seemed very sharp, very short. The bass drum sounded fantastic. In fact I pulled the drummer of the band, who had played in the record I produced, in to listen. He said, 'I've never heard a bass drum sound like that on a recording.

There is something about the very high speed [response to sound reinforcement] of those speakers. I guess, because they're small speakers; they move very fast and they damp [finish moving] very quickly as well. That seems to be an important part of the sound. The operating principle seems to me to be excellent. It's a completely new idea as far as I can tell in speaker technology and, having listened to them for a little while, I am extremely impressed by their potential. They are also very accurate in getting close to the real sound image and the actual positioning of each instrument. It is a new principle; a different kind of idea from other speakers and, I suppose, it's the beginning of a new road towards a new way of listening to sound.

One thing I like is they are not in speaker boxes. I am sick of boxes. I like the fact this is a beautiful shape and it looks like something from this century, the 21st century, not from the last century and it sounds like something from this century as well”

I have a MDSM in my bedroom with Eclipse TD510s and the result is very good. I bought the speakers some time ago. I would be dubious of recommending them as the price for a new pair is more than double what I paid. 

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Super Wammer

Floyd Toole stated in his book that musicians' performances in listening tests were "not distinctive."

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On 15/09/2021 at 07:57, Nestor Turton said:

Brian also likes Eclipse single driver loudspeakers

The one time I heard an Eclipse system, I was quite impressed. I always liked Fujitsu plasma displays, and their computers, so I'm not surprised they make just as excellent audio gear.

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