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Local music storage on NAS, Melco, NUC, etc.


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Growing up, music was a huge influence in my world, and sometimes felt like the one thing that made sense to me.

‘I made friends with people that had a large collection of vinyl LP’s and was exposed to a lot of great rock music that went well beyond what I heard on AM radio, or Classic Rock FM stations. I loved the garage bands and one hit wonders, but really enjoyed the album rock played on FM radio. Instead of the usually top 40, 3-4 minute singles played on the radio, I gained a love of songs that were 10 minutes or longer, and could even take up a whole side. Albums from Yes, Genesis, Led Zeppelin, Moody Blues and others, dominated my world.

In hindsight however, I don’t know how I missed buying so many important albums of that era. I now have a profound appreciation of those groups, such as the Doors, Steely Dan, Eric Clapton, and Jimmy Hendrix, to name a few.

‘I feel so privileged to have lived through such an amazing time for music, and being able to have been part of that history.

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one of the benefits of buying music is that I'm not at the mercy of the streaming service when it comes to latest remaster... I can look for and wait for the master I want. cheap subscription of any streaming service helps to choose what to buy. 

plus, there are albums not available on any service I tried so got to buy them.

Edited by dari
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Obviously we are all of a certain age!

It's only this year that the incredible creativity of the year of 1971 has been brought home to me as the 50th anniversary rolls around. 

I have, according to my assett Nas a collection of over 900 Cds. they are also cluttering up two large suitcases in my garage. They sound significantly better when converted on the fly as WAV files . Since I upgraded to Katalyst the 192/24bit files sound even more magnificent. Qobuz has increased my appreciation of many of my old Cds as they have been released in Hi res.

Streaming has encouraged me to be much more eclectic in my tastes. Classical, Jazz , Rock, Blues, There is so much great music out there. We really do live in an amazing era. Time to do my daily gratitude genuflection 😉

Cheers  

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there are obvious benefits that comes with the streaming platforms (like low monthly cots or huge libraries) but one thing I cannot stand is the lack of customisation of the home screen (would be even better to be able to set what you want to see on the platform in general).. so Tidal, Apple Music, Spotify - all of them really - throw at me pop, rap and all that crxx.. from that perspective, Qobuz seems to be a for a more mature customers. 

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On 10/09/2021 at 18:53, akamatsu said:

My hierarchy is;

LP, Qobuz, Tidal, CD

If I like it, I buy it on LP. If not available on LP then stream on Qobuz. Not on Qobuz, Tidal. Not on Tidal, buy and rip on CD.

I tend to purchase music because I like owning it, and I want to support the artists. I'll buy a CD to support the artist, even if streaming on Qobuz or Tidal is available. I also don't want to be left without the music if Qobuz/Tidal no longer offer an album.

I also know people who only stream Tidal/Qobuz, and that suits them perfectly. Some of us are more into collecting than most.

Michael,

It seems to be the more comprehensive way to buy and play music now.

As the LP12 at home was in phase inversion – I didn't check until yesterday, and 2 of the 4 brand new wall electrical outlets are inverted !?! – the quality of the analogic sound is way better and it fills in the room now……………… So, your hierarchy is great 😊

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3 hours ago, Chris 1970 said:

Michael,

It seems to be the more comprehensive way to buy and play music now.

As the LP12 at home was in phase inversion – I didn't check until yesterday, and 2 of the 4 brand new wall electrical outlets are inverted !?! – the quality of the analogic sound is way better and it fills in the room now……………… So, your hierarchy is great 😊

I'm 14 weeks since ordering the KSH. I should be hearing it all at my house soon. Yours and others' comments are getting me pretty excited about it all. Thanks!

Streaming subscriptions vs owning isn't an either/or situation. I find it most advantageous to tap into the strengths of both.

Edited by akamatsu
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21 hours ago, Newton John said:

Thanks for all the answers. Food for thought.

All CDs ripped securely except one track, Refugees- Radio 1 John Peel 1971 last track on the Pawn Hearts Sessions. dBpoweramp struggled a bit with a few tracks at the end of the CDs, but usually got there eventually.

Qobuz has everything from the box set except the high res versions on the Blu-rays. i.e. all 17 CDs including both original and new mixes.

So far I've only listened to the new mixes of the albums. At present, I'm trying to familiarise myself with the music of all the bands that I'll be seeing at a festival next weekend. After that, I intend to delve into the box set and book.

Van Der Graaf Generator were only the second gig I ever attended on 3rd March 1969 at the Bay Hotel in Sunderland when I was fifteen (the first was Pink Floyd a couple of weeks earlier - those were the days. I missed out on so many great bands because they were usually on a Monday, a school night). I can be precise about the details because the promoter appended his records for the period to his autobiography. John Peel was there and the support was Black Sabbath.

Although I remember enjoying their performance that evening, I've never really got into any of their albums until recently. I thought the box set was a good opportunity to make up for lost time.

Thank you for the detailed and very useful post. It is interesting to know Qobuz has copies of these albums too. My shelves are fairly full and I keep saying this will be my last box set and then another compelling collection comes along. During lockdown I bought sets by Colosseum, Barbara Thompson, Gong and Steve Hillage as well as VDGG’s Aerosol Grey Machine box and the vinyl rereleases from Peter Hammill and the K Group. I also bought the complete Nirvana vinyl box set (the Uk band from the 1960s, not the 90s band from US) and I’m delighted with them all.  The last set I bought before VDDG’s Charisma Years was by Caravan. 

I wonder if a Qobuz subscription would cure me from my box addiction. Perhaps after the Let It Be box set arrives it would be good to stop.  

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On 11/09/2021 at 16:08, Jail4CEOs2 said:

While they all had their start last century, try this century's Wilco, Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Leonard Cohen's last two records, Raising Sand by Bob and Alison, James Taylor, October Road, Jackson Browne, The Naked Ride Home, and Steely Dan, Two Against Nature just squeaks in to this century too, as it was released in Feb 2000. That's a fine load of this century fare.

Although my music collection is heavily weighted towards the 60s and 70s, I agree there have been some great release this century. I’m not familiar with the albums you list, but I shall try to have a listen to some of them. I would suggest albums by Basia Bulat (Oh My Darling), Kate Rusby (Ghost), Karine Polwart (This Earthly Spell), The Eccentronic Research Council (1612 Underture) and Public Service Broadcasting (The Race For Space). 

There are, of course, last century bands still making great albums such as Van Der Graaf Generator’s Trisector and Grounding in Numbers, Half Man Half Biscuit’s - well everything they’ve done really - Eddy Grant’s Reparation and Scott Walker’s The Drift. 

I’m sure there is more … 

I think Peter Hammill must have written this song with me or someone just like me in mind 

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Jeremy Clarkson wrote in the Sunday Times a few weeks back that all the best music was written and recorded from the early 70’s to the start of punk and everything else is rubbish. While I don’t entirely agree with him, nearly all my favourite albums are from that period

There are plenty of records from other time periods which are indeed excellent, and not quite rubbish - but as a whole, if one casts a wide and deep net into the music recorded, produced, and sold during the 1970's, there is so much more of it that is good, than bad (my personal opinion of course) because the competition back then was hardcore. And, it was a worldwide phenomena. It brought out the best in talent as a result. Nowadays, with everyone being able to make beats on a computer fairly easily, the competition is lacking because people care less and less about musicianship any longer it seems, with rare exception.

I read an article by Bill Bruford on The Absolute Sound (I know, a trash rag* but a decent writeup nonetheless) that sort of touched on this recently: https://www.theabsolutesound.com/articles/absent-without-leave

And I highly agree with @Ian H's assessment of OP's question.

*I say this somewhat jokingly, but the fact is as much as I am not a huge fan of Stereophile, I am less a fan of Absolute Sound. Great for thumbing through the latest high-gloss ads, though.

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