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A simple method to upgrade Windows 10 to 11 on Unsupported hardware if you want to give it a try.


Mikeb
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The link below is a simple method to update Windows 10 to 11  using an official Microsoft windows 11 iso download and method.

https://gearupwindows.com/how-to-install-windows-11-on-unsupported-pcs/

I have updated two laptops, one with no supported hardware an old mobile intel i5, and another amd dual boot Linux/windows 10 with 2.0 TPM but unsupported cpu. 

The installations were not a clean type version but one to include all my files and apps which I still required.

Both updated with no problems including the dual boot setup and seem to work well. I also checked the sfc of both installations with no problems indicated.

After installation windows updates worked perfectly. However, it cannot be completely relied upon in the future that Microsoft will continue this on unsupported hardware.

During the updating it is important that you ensure the check box not to update during the installation process is ticked, any updating can be done later.

If you update Windows 10 using the above method it is at your own risk and a backup of important data essential.

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Hi Mike

I also get the processor not supported error.  I am running an I5 3570k as as you had but was you processor  supported?

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No the intel i5 nor the amd processors were on the supported list.

However, as I stated above I found it was important at the time of the initial installation that the box asking "if you DO NOT want to update now" is ticked  and that you carry out any updates after the installation, which is all good. Initially I missed that box as it was hidden under the question and it then checked if the processer was supported and informed it wasn't, so I went back a  couple of steps and made sure the box was clicked and all ok when I continued with the installation. Hope that makes sense.

By the way as this is an audio related Forum I don't think any of the audio drivers have changed compared to the windows 10 installation so there are unlikely to be any significant increase in sound quality, at least for the time being.

So far I have been happy with Windows 11 but you do need to learn where everyday things that you use are located which is not too difficult and will probably become second nature after a few times using the computer.

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Thank you for this following the instructions step by step I have updated my Toshiba Laptop with AMD chip with no issues .

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I have a laptop that initially reported (via MS's PC Health Check app) that it didn't meet the requirements for Win 11 because TPM wasn't enabled, and Windows Update also said Win 11 requirements not supported. So, went through the rigmarole in the BIOS to enable TPM, rebooted, and the Health Check app now shows all the requirements for Win 11 are met, but Windows Update still complains that there's a problem. Any ideas...?

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On 10/10/2021 at 10:03, Mikeb said:

The link below is a simple method to update Windows 10 to 11  using an official Microsoft windows 11 iso download and method.

https://gearupwindows.com/how-to-install-windows-11-on-unsupported-pcs/

I have updated two laptops, one with no supported hardware an old mobile intel i5, and another amd dual boot Linux/windows 10 with 2.0 TPM but unsupported cpu. 

The installations were not a clean type version but one to include all my files and apps which I still required.

Both updated with no problems including the dual boot setup and seem to work well. I also checked the sfc of both installations with no problems indicated.

After installation windows updates worked perfectly. However, it cannot be completely relied upon in the future that Microsoft will continue this on unsupported hardware.

During the updating it is important that you ensure the check box not to update during the installation process is ticked, any updating can be done later.

If you update Windows 10 using the above method it is at your own risk and a backup of important data essential.

my laptop is ok with the upgrade but I had a warning that some apps might not be supported so I held back

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12 hours ago, Tony_J said:

I have a laptop that initially reported (via MS's PC Health Check app) that it didn't meet the requirements for Win 11 because TPM wasn't enabled, and Windows Update also said Win 11 requirements not supported. So, went through the rigmarole in the BIOS to enable TPM, rebooted, and the Health Check app now shows all the requirements for Win 11 are met, but Windows Update still complains that there's a problem. Any ideas...?

After telling me yesterday that the machine wasn't compatible, this morning Windows Update says "This PC can run Windows 11"...:doh:

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4 hours ago, Tony_J said:

After telling me yesterday that the machine wasn't compatible, this morning Windows Update says "This PC can run Windows 11"...:doh:

That is oh so Microsoft .

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Lenovo T420 , my old play around on machine, successfully installed and upgraded post installation. Now says fully up to date

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10 minutes ago, slavedata said:

Lenovo T420 , my old play around on machine, successfully installed and upgraded post installation. Now says fully up to date

Did Windows Update consider it to be suitable for Win 11 or did you upgrade using the ISO download?

Edited by Tony_J
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I am not too much of a luddite with computers, but I have had my fingers burned far too often in the past with OS upgrades. I also have some issues in the form of a few pieces of relatively old, highly useful (to me) and now unavailable software. If it all goes slightly wrong, that would leave me with a problem. Plus, to be honest, why bother? It's taken me a fair while to get Windows 10 to work and do things the way I want, rather than the way someone in Silcon Valley thinks is best.

Frankly, I still think 7 Pro was better.

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8 hours ago, Tony_J said:

Did Windows Update consider it to be suitable for Win 11 or did you upgrade using the ISO download?

Windows 11 upgrade using the ISO download rejected the machine on grounds of processor and having only TPM  1.2

I renamed the .dll file detailed above to .dxx to disable it and followed the simple instructions. It then installed with no issues. Post installation it upgraded as usual and is working fine.

Edited by slavedata
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