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Transport Vs Streamer


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1 hour ago, DomT said:

Up sampling is an interesting point. I can understand why some people may like it.

I would expect most people to like it. Only a few have non-oversampling DACs.

It just a matter whether to do it in the DAC or with software.

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The Benchmark DAC 2 for example:

CONCEPTUAL OVERSAMPLING

The digital filters in the DAC2 operate at a conceptual sample rate of about 250 GHz. Incoming audio is conceptually upsampled to 250 GHz and then down sampled to 211 kHz using a filter that mathematically behaves as if it is operating at a 250 Giga-sample-per-second rate.

Edited by tuga
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7 hours ago, DomT said:

Up sampling is an interesting point. I can understand why some people may like it.

I listened to an upsampled track at@Fourlegs’s house on his big system. We compared it to the same track non-upsampled. I can’t remember the technology or the amount of upsampling but Nick suggested it was an excellent example of it. He really enjoyed the upsampled version. It didn’t do anything for me at all musically because nothing from a musical standpoint had changed; the music just sounded bigger. 
 

@Blzebub May or may not be your thing?

I don't know enough about this subject (upsampling vs not) to comment.

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Super Wammer

had a play with a audiolab cdt today . what a fine little unit . nice and heavy and well made. not a fan of slot loaders but piece of cake to use . sounded pretty good , i think it edged out my marantz 6007 possibly   

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7 hours ago, tuga said:

I would expect most people to like it. Only a few have non-oversampling DACs.

It just a matter whether to do it in the DAC or with software.

.

The Benchmark DAC 2 for example:

CONCEPTUAL OVERSAMPLING

The digital filters in the DAC2 operate at a conceptual sample rate of about 250 GHz. Incoming audio is conceptually upsampled to 250 GHz and then down sampled to 211 kHz using a filter that mathematically behaves as if it is operating at a 250 Giga-sample-per-second rate.

I had forgotten that. But having heard a ‘before’ and ‘after’ upsampling is not something that I would particularly pay for if not already included as it doesn’t enhance musicality for me; it’s a HiFi thing. 

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Super Wammer

I use JRiver to upsample to 24/192 which is what my DAC operates at. Sounds good to me vs. non-upsampled.

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One other potential advantage of using off-board upconversion (upsampling + PCM>DSD conversion) into a DAC with NOS mode is the ability to bypass the on-chip Sigma Delta Modulator (SDM).

Most DACs use Delta-Sigma D/A chips which convert PCM to DSD in the last stage of the Digital-to-Analogue conversion, and by using software like HQPlayer, Audirvana or JRiver into NOS DACs one can have full control of the upsampling, filtering, noise-shaping and SDM conversion, and all that the DAC does is to convert the final bit stream into analogue.

Most DACs upsample, filter, dither and ΔΣ-modulate using off the shelf chips or all-in-one chips with basic algorithms. This computing requires power and produces noise which affects the D/A conversion and may produce jitter and IMD at ultrasonic frequencies which could translate as an audible "hardness" or "glare".

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This is the diagram of the AKM AK4493EQ chip used in the previous version of the RME ADI-2 DAC (due to a fire at AKM which resulted in a shortage of AK chips, the current model now uses an ESS chip, which sadly cannot be fully bypassed - no DSD Direct mode):

BdE1WVS.gif

Edited by tuga
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Here’s my recent experience of trying out new cd transports with my Denafrips Ares 2.  Tried Audiolab 6000 CDT, much more detailed than my pimped Node 2i into the same DAC, but not full bodied enough for my liking. Tried Leak CDT, which is made by Audiolab’s parent company, similarly priced and shares some of its internals, and there was a world of difference apparent immediately, detail and body in abundance, and the presentation far more relaxed and organic. The Leak is unmistakably better than pimped Node 2i into same DAC, and is the best I’ve ever heard digital in my system. I’m talking about comparing cds and corresponding rips here. Bits are not just bits.

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On 12/11/2021 at 17:39, MotherSky said:

I think the reasoning is that you can buffer the data, and read it from a cache, rather than '"on the fly" - this tallies with my experience up to a point: my former reference digital source was a PSAudio PWT that read the disc to a RAM buffer, before passing the data to my DAC - the same files played from my NAS or Qobuz were perceptibly inferior (though differences were marginal once I'd invested more seriously in my streaming "chain") - I have similar results using the facility of my Auralic to directly connect a high quality disc drive - it buffers from the disc in a similar way.

 Possibly Linn make the assertion because they can't make a decent CD player....

I believe the Audiolab and Leak CDTs both feature a buffering function which reads ahead before feeding the data upstream, which might partially account for their fine performance. 

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Just picked up a second hand CD today. I'm giving it a spin on my Audiolab CDT transport currently and very fine it sounds

However when i get a chance i will rip it to My Melco N100 hard disk server

streaming rips from the Melco over ethernet into my DAC is consistently better with less digital glare / edge

YMMV

Edited by mtbmarkymark
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