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:^ True and if my memory serves me right, "Nice enough" was one of many "Sampler" albums which allowed you to dip your feet into upcoming bands, like Free Fairport, King Crimson etc. Along with the likes of "You can all join in", "Rock Machine turns you an", "Picnic", "All good clean fun" and too many others to mention' these were the albums which allowed me to discover some of my favourite "Underground" bands of the late 60's. A great time, when music meant a lot more than it does today.:dunno:

:peace:

Great record that i borrowed in about '84 and which opened my eyes to lots of music i'd not heard before.

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Hi All,

To be quite honest I can not see the point in trying to labell everything and put everything into "pigeon holes" except in the very

broadest terms. The way things have gone in recent years beggars belief with so many descriptions given to so much music.

A good number of these catagories do not even seem describe the type of music.

If this trend were to be projected far enough forward in time the inevitable result would be a new catagory for every tune or song.

Remember when there was just "Pop" and "Classical"?

Rgds.

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Hi All,

To be quite honest I can not see the point in trying to labell everything and put everything into "pigeon holes" except in the very

broadest terms. The way things have gone in recent years beggars belief with so many descriptions given to so much music.

A good number of these catagories do not even seem describe the type of music.

If this trend were to be projected far enough forward in time the inevitable result would be a new catagory for every tune or song.

Remember when there was just "Pop" and "Classical"?

Rgds.

:nup: Nope, even I cant remember that far back happy-old-009.gif.

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Great question, I didn't really think much in categories back in the late 70s when I was alternately playing Yes, Camel, Zappa, George Duke, Brand X, Colosseum (I and II), Caravan and the like (as well as a ton of classical music, and other stuff by all sorts from Bowie to Dylan - especially Dylan).

Essentially I liked it because it was proper music, played by musicians - unlike punk, which was a pretty unintelligent/downmarket form of youth rebellion for the most part (a few eventually learned to play their instruments and sing but that came later). Or disco, which was all about dressing like a prat and dancing (FFS).

It was only later that things got classified into strict genres. I doubt anyone who heard the last Zeppelin gig at Knebworth knew they were listening to 'heavy metal' any more than I though 'I'm going to see a prog band' when I went to see Yes in 78 at the Glasgow Apollo.

Retrospectively things can be more clearly classified but I'm not sure back then anyone gave a monkeys, you liked a band, or followed individual musicians, not a 'genre'. Bill Bruford is a case in point - drummer for Yes, King Crimson, his own eponymous jazz-rock fusion outfit, and straight modern Jazz with Earthworks all in a decade. Classify that!

Rather than sitting down and stroking your beard and playing with your spectacles looking all serious and stuff. Yeah thats much better than dancing with sexy ladies in tight shiny clothes and having yourself a fun night of debauchery :D but I'm versatile enough to do both and have natural rhythm so can dance like a motherfucker, the ladies love it. carlton.gif

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I agree with Monty that classification by genre means little but for a rough guide - "I'm into Blues" what does that mean? - Robert Johnson (ok definitely), Muddy Walters (pretty well), Coltrane (no but there is a blues form to so much), the Stones (well sort of), Zeppelin (not really but plagiarism is I guess the best form of creativity).

Whizzer - are you coming to Whittlebury? Meet you in the Cymbiosis room, will arrange for some King Crimson to be dubbed onto Sister Sledge and you can demonstrate what makes the ladies go whoo hoo. Mrs Strat is likely to be there to judge!!!!!

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Seems to me daft to slam folk music for depressing, moarnful lyrics, on several counts.

- It doesn't affect how the music sounds and appeals ( or not ) to the listener - Of course it does it sounds like music for the dead or at least those that have really bad pox .

- Comparatively, with music that formed roots of rock music, it is hardly alone - think of blues most particularly ! Also C&W - But blues does shift the mood with some rhythm and beat. You can't groove to Guthrie (and I quite like some his stuff!)

- In days long past people had less choices and ability to change circumstances than they do today - Yes they did, they could have worked harder on land and reaped more - lazy slobs;-)

- Besides it simply isn't true that lyrics were all or mainly like that - OK then peasant boy cheer me up some

You're wrong you need to reconsider your position as Notty's Agent.

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Actually whilst I liked early Queen up to Killer Queen - great live band and fun/witty and inventive - I equally agreed your excellent (doubt I'll say that again mate!) critique in your thread. Dire Straits (for the most part excellent band) but guess what the Knopfler solo stuff - well it's all a bit folky and whilst some is very good some is less than engaging.

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I'm sorry

You're sorry? - blaggards like you never repent until it's too late - when you think there might be an outside chance of salvation - well there isn't Notaclue will be dismissing you forthwith and you'll be over a bridge in a sack full of bricks.

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Relayer is great. Tales From Top is a hard listen in one session. Tormato must be my least favourite Yes album. What was Wakeman playing? The keyboards sound like Casio and Bontempi stuff from Argos :eek:

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Super Wammer
Relayer is great. Tales From Top is a hard listen in one session. Tormato must be my least favourite Yes album. What was Wakeman playing? The keyboards sound like Casio and Bontempi stuff from Argos :eek:

Musically, I would agree that Relayer is the best Yes album but the recording itself is pretty poor in places. Tormato deserved the tomatoes thrown at the cover !

k

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Relayer is great. Tales From Top is a hard listen in one session. Tormato must be my least favourite Yes album. What was Wakeman playing? The keyboards sound like Casio and Bontempi stuff from Argos :eek:

Depends what you are listening for. For musicianship and sheer musical invention, Relayer and Fragile are where it's at. Tales was where it all got out of hand (too much acid, clearly) but when I was 14 I loved it.

Probably these days the one I reach for - that works best as an album and is fairly pretty accessible to those who don't sit and count beats to try and work out what the time signature is - is Going for the One, it was all down hill from there IMO. I was lucky enough to catch the Wondrous Stories tour in '78.

As for disco, I could never stand the noise and never did manage to pull in a nightclub ... Gave up trying early on, in general the air-headed chicks who went there had no appeal anyway, I usually managed to pull the more intelligent using wit, charm and conversation, kind of hard to do with Cool and the Gang blasting at 100db.

Anyway if you can say anything about anything it's that back in the day, 'Prog' however you define it was generally for nice boys in sensible haircuts, however the bands dressed.

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According to the ego-maniac that is Jon Anderson, the reason for Tales to turn out the way it did, was based on a throw away line from a jounalist. The journo stated that, in order for Yes to top Close To The Edge, they would have to set the Bible to music. Jon thought, "well fuck you. I will use Eastern mysticism instead." As Yes's recording process was getting small pieces together to form a whole under the direction of Anderson (and a loosely formed democracy*), it kind of took on it's own life. They found that it got out of control quite quickly but Jon thought that it had merit. Thus a double album of 4 tracks was born.

While they all are in agreement that it wasn't their finest hour (leading to Wakeman leaving), there is some concensus that it contains some great moments, just too much filler.

I think it's a great album. Not their best (that title changes according to my mood) but still worthy.

*The democratic part was EVERYBODY had a say about EVERYTHING. Hours were spent analysing whether the required Bass note should be an F or an F#. But they ALL had to agree :roll:

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Musically, I would agree that Relayer is the best Yes album but the recording itself is pretty poor in places. Tormato deserved the tomatoes thrown at the cover !

k

Hi Bob,

I have had the "Relayer" LP ever since it came out and even though I have allways thought it fantastic I had also thought that

something was not quite right.

When after some years my GL85 TT finally gave up, I replaced it with a 1210 and first of all used it with my old M75ED which

was soon replaced first with an AT 95E, better, and finally with an AT440MLa mod'd with the resisters in parrallel to eliminate

the HF peak. It made Relayer sound very much better and it seems the information is there if you can dig it out.

Fragile, Close to the Edge, Relayer.

What a magical collection, and what super times they hail from.

Rgds.

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I can't stand Relayer... its all just hard work and too noisy. Close to the Edge is their best IMO. Bill Buford agreed - he left after that as he reckoned they'd never do better.

The Yes Album is a a good one too.

I enjoy Going for the One a lot, some of the arrangements and interplay between the musicians is just spellbinding especially the organ/bass/drums in Parallels and piano/guitar in Turn of the Century. Unfortunately, like Relayer, it was let down by poor recording while Close to the Edge and earlier albums were superbly engineered.

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