hermano

Anyone know anything about these?

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As with all unknown products from an unknown man-in-shed-with-a-dream, they have no credibility in a market absolutely stuffed with valid alternatives. As said above, £2k buys you a heck of a lot of second hand loudspeaker and all of them will retain value far better than an unknown.

It's all very clever to take pops at "mainstream crap" but for all we know your speakers might be the crap. There's nothing out of the ordinary in a three way ported mdf floorstander and so far you have ducked the questions on cabinet construction and driver complement. How come? And a couple more questions: What is your training and experience as an "acoustic engineer" and how is the crossover implemented in the Koyas?

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From little Acorns.......?

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The price of any piece of art is an agreement between the artist and the buyer. You are of course free to stick to your valuation but it remains just that!

Have you actually sold any Koyas yet? If not, your £1950 means as little as ICHM's £500.

Cheers JANDL100. There is so much hype in the speaker industry - meanwhile it's mostly a forgotten art the same way car mechanics no longer fix cars!

Yeah, I can't stand it when people refuse to provide basic technical information on their product and refer to themselves as "artists" and as their own God ;-)

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From little Acorns.......?

Get eaten by fat squirrels.

Fat-Squirrel.jpg

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The price of any piece of art is an agreement between the artist and the buyer. You are of course free to stick to your valuation but it remains just that!

Except that loudspeaker design is engineering, not art.

For any new product to be taken seriously, it should provide a detailed specification, with, at the very least graphs of the anechoic frequency response, polar diagram and distortion against frequency measured at 90dBSPL at 1m. That will show that the designer has a grasp of the technology, and that the loudspeaker has been designed rather than a DIY job. There's nothing wrong with DIY for oneself, but not if it's to be a commercial product, competing with the likes of Harman, KEF, B&W and Harbeth.

These loudspeakers look nice enough, and if well designed, manufactured, marketed and supported could well be worth £2,000 or even £20,000 but there's just no way of knowing from what was on eBay whether these are good loudspeakers or "white van" loudspeakers.

More information please.

S.

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Except that loudspeaker design is engineering, not art.

:nup:

WP_20140517_0021_zps65585511.jpg

:D

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:nup:

WP_20140517_0021_zps65585511.jpg

:D

Dear God :shock:

I dread to think what the travelling wammers got up to with that after a few biers...

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Dear God :shock:

I dread to think what the travelling wammers got up to with that after a few biers...

They sound ok :? Certainly better than they look.

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As with all unknown products from an unknown man-in-shed-with-a-dream, they have no credibility in a market absolutely stuffed with valid alternatives. As said above, £2k buys you a heck of a lot of second hand loudspeaker and all of them will retain value far better than an unknown.

It's all very clever to take pops at "mainstream crap" but for all we know your speakers might be the crap. There's nothing out of the ordinary in a three way ported mdf floorstander and so far you have ducked the questions on cabinet construction and driver complement. How come? And a couple more questions: What is your training and experience as an "acoustic engineer" and how is the crossover implemented in the Koyas?

Drivers are Peerless 8" bass, 4½ mid and 1" dome tweeter

Crossover is 3rd order bespoke design using air cored inductors and audio grade capacitors.

Cabinet is 19mm MDF and tuned to Butterworth B4 maximally flat alignment so a very natural sound.

My training comes from reading AES back papers on the subject of ported cabinet design by Thiele and Small. Just about as far into the subject one can go!

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Except that loudspeaker design is engineering, not art.

For any new product to be taken seriously, it should provide a detailed specification, with, at the very least graphs of the anechoic frequency response, polar diagram and distortion against frequency measured at 90dBSPL at 1m. That will show that the designer has a grasp of the technology, and that the loudspeaker has been designed rather than a DIY job. There's nothing wrong with DIY for oneself, but not if it's to be a commercial product, competing with the likes of Harman, KEF, B&W and Harbeth.

These loudspeakers look nice enough, and if well designed, manufactured, marketed and supported could well be worth £2,000 or even £20,000 but there's just no way of knowing from what was on eBay whether these are good loudspeakers or "white van" loudspeakers.

More information please.

S.

The brands you mention all produce speakers with an obvious compromise on established acoustic theory. They make up for that with an element of 'pseudo science' and simple branding, [h=1]Harbeth M30 speakers PAIR (used) £1440 . . . Really?![/h]

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Dr Nelson, I'm going to leave discussions of the speakers to those more knowledgeable/qualified/opinionated than me, but just wanted to say that I'm loving the stone and nature photography on your website, very cool.

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The brands you mention all produce speakers with an obvious compromise on established acoustic theory. They make up for that with an element of 'pseudo science' and simple branding, Harbeth M30 speakers PAIR (used) £1440 . . . Really?!

Sometimes people never know when they have a tiger by the tail, and I feel this is such an instance. :pop:

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Drivers are Peerless 8" bass, 4½ mid and 1" dome tweeter

Crossover is 3rd order bespoke design using air cored inductors and audio grade capacitors.

Cabinet is 19mm MDF and tuned to Butterworth B4 maximally flat alignment so a very natural sound.

My training comes from reading AES back papers on the subject of ported cabinet design by Thiele and Small. Just about as far into the subject one can go!

Does that mean I would be a brain surgeon if I read enough back issues of The Lancet? :^

The brands you mention all produce speakers with an obvious compromise on established acoustic theory. They make up for that with an element of 'pseudo science' and simple branding, Harbeth M30 speakers PAIR (used) £1440 . . . Really?!

Obviously the companies mentioned (except maybe Harbeth) will have marketing departments but that is because they are actual real commercial companies, doing what companies do. They also employ engineers, with training and qualifications and everything.

Those same companies are such bullshitters and blaggers... They obviously spend all that money on r&d, making their own drive units and cabinet manufacture just to hoodwink the gullible public.

Do you make your 19mm mdf loudspeakers without compromise in your kitchen? And is the mighty NAD 3020a your preferred piece of test equipment?

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Super Wammer

Nothing wrong with home made if it's good. Personally I think they look tacky but that's just me. The formica is remarkably like that in my kitchen which came from B&Q and peels off if you so much as look at it, but it's so horrible I try not to.

These loudspeakers look nice enough, and if well designed, manufactured, marketed and supported could well be worth £2,000 or even £20,000 but there's just no way of knowing from what was on eBay whether these are good loudspeakers or "white van" loudspeakers. S.

Fairly safe to say they're white van speakers; according to his website the designer lives in a white self-converted fruit van called 'Mercy' complete with 'bespoke' access panels! Aftercare could be a bit hit and miss on these what with the company having no fixed address. Sending them off to a service station having a whole new meaning. I'll watch out for cherries, plums and pairs of loudspeakers next time I pass a layby.

And is that £2k for a pair? 'KOYA are no ordinary loudspeaker.' Aaarghh. Maybe one should be KOY. It's certainly singular. New product from B&Q's Steyning research laboratory perhaps?

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Does that mean I would be a brain surgeon if I read enough back issues of The Lancet? :^

Obviously the companies mentioned (except maybe Harbeth) will have marketing departments but that is because they are actual real commercial companies, doing what companies do. They also employ engineers, with training and qualifications and everything.

Those same companies are such bullshitters and blaggers... They obviously spend all that money on r&d, making their own drive units and cabinet manufacture just to hoodwink the gullible public.

Do you make your 19mm mdf loudspeakers without compromise in your kitchen? And is the mighty NAD 3020a your preferred piece of test equipment?

The 3020 was my introduction to NAD and is an iconic bit of kit. Koya now sing nicely along with a NAD C372

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