Cheap alternative to Origin Live Upgrade Transformer (PSU)

John (big)

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I looked around the internet looking for an upgrade AC-AC PSU for the Origin Live DC motor on my Hydraulic Reference Turntable.

I found a couple of references to a Maplin L54BR AC-AC 12v 3a PSU being up to the job.

Today I phoned Maplins to confirm they had one in stock and to reserve it, I drove to Ealing Broadway with my 18 year old son whilst I went round the block, parking in Ealing is so poor like many others with cars, I go elsewhere to shop.

In Maplins the assistant quizzed my son as to the use for an AC-AC psu who ended up saying he had just had a lecture from me that 90% of psu's are AC-DC etc. only when satisfied did my son get the psu; well done Maplins.

This evening I pluged in the L54BR nothing went bang, I left it for the usual 3 minutes to stabilize no adjustments needed on the control unit, I have been listening to music most of the day so I dropped the needle on to a track my initial reaction was better more fluid bass and better/slower timing seemingly more space.

This follows on from some preamp mods and will require thought, so far very pleased...

 

Cable Monkey

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I am a fan of the Maplin AC-AC transformers. I have a couple in situ and find them a cost effective replacement for my MF cylindrical units (X-LP and X-CAN).

Oddly enough I am a long time user of the OL DC motor but have never thought it necessary to try an alternative to the basic one supplied. I will admit to some annoyance at the eye watering cost of relatively simple upgrades, which in turn taints my view of all else Origin Live. However I doubt they lose much sleep over that fact! :)

I shall give your suggestion a go. After all, it will cost me nothing to try it!

 

KevinF

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I fancy you pay Origin Live for the intellectual property as well as the material cost of the upgrade component. Why is that unreasonable? I doubt you download music from sharing sites and thus avoid paying the artists for creating it.

 

Cable Monkey

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I fancy you pay Origin Live for the intellectual property as well as the material cost of the upgrade component. Why is that unreasonable? I doubt you download music from sharing sites and thus avoid paying the artists for creating it.
Itellectual property? A bigger transformer? Get real Kev!

 

John (big)

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An aluminium box with one circuit board + cheap PSU & motor = £255 I have now been told of further low cost upgrades to the circuit board... I must admit the Origin Live works well.http://i605.photobucket.com/albums/tt134/palace2009/turntable/025_zpse568b03b.jpg

r
025_zpse568b03b.jpg
ntable/025_zpse568b03b.jpg

 

KevinF

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Itellectual property? A bigger transformer? Get real Kev!
If a manufacturer knows that changing a component in a product results in better sound, then that's a form of IP. You are paying for the intelligence and/or the experience that achieves the sonic result, not the cost of the component on its own.

This is far from unusual. Add up the component and materials cost of an amplifier that retails at say £1,000 and it's a fair bet that with most manufacturers you'd be hard pushed to arrive at a bill exceeding perhaps £100. The rest of the ticket price is know-how (and, er, marketing and VAT).

However, I agree that Big John did the rational thing by sourcing the transformer elsewhere. I bet it made a very pleasing difference to the TT.

 

Cable Monkey

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If a manufacturer knows that changing a component in a product results in better sound, then that's a form of IP. You are paying for the intelligence and/or the experience that achieves the sonic result, not the cost of the component on its own.This is far from unusual. Add up the component and materials cost of an amplifier that retails at say £1,000 and it's a fair bet that with most manufacturers you'd be hard pushed to arrive at a bill exceeding perhaps £100. The rest of the ticket price is know-how (and, er, marketing and VAT).
There comes a point where something in the public domain can no longer be justifiably considered someone elses ip. Fair play to them, they charge what some people are willing to pay, but that is their choice and not a legal obligation as the use of the intellectual property explanation suggests. Here is a suggestion for you. Why not use a transformer fit for purpose from the start? Why sell a product with compromised performance? Because by doing so you can actually make more money! That is where the know-how comes in! And this is said as a customer, not a hater of the brand or product.

 

John (big)

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There comes a point where something in the public domain can no longer be justifiably considered someone elses ip. Fair play to them, they charge what some people are willing to pay, but that is their choice and not a legal obligation as the use of the intellectual property explanation suggests. Here is a suggestion for you. Why not use a transformer fit for purpose from the start? Why sell a product with compromised performance? Because by doing so you can actually make more money! That is where the know-how comes in! And this is said as a customer, not a hater of the brand or product.
Now there is a novel concept...

 

Vinyl Art

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IP isn't actually a protection of rights scheme on its own. It is a catchall all phrase used to describe patents, Copyright, trade Secrets, Trade marks etc....each of these right s are granted in law and can be protected.

As an example, if a subcontractor designs and operates your company's web page the subcontractor retains the copyright unless agreed in the contract terms.

registering a trading name does not protect it, you would need to register it as a Trade Mark to acheive that.

IP does not run out of time unless it is part of the legal framework, such as patents.

being in the public domain does not diminish, in it's own right, any of the IP protections granted. As an example "Coca Cola" prtects it's trade mark vigourously and it has been in the public domain for a hundred years.

 

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