Chefs: Who do you rate and who do you hate ?

Ozexpat

Wammer
Wammer
Nov 16, 2009
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the brewhouse
HiFi Trade?
  1. No
Inspired by another thread, which professional chefs do you rate and hate. Obviously, a certain amount of the "personality" will influence how you feel but a purely culinary opinion is also valid (that is why most of them are chefs after all).

Rate:

Mark Sargent - once out of the shadow of Ramsay, stripped his food back to basics. Excellent.

Heston Blumenthal - food as science. I wasn't sure until I tried it. Fantastic (once).

Jamie Oliver - unfashionable of me I know but once he shuts his gob and actually cooks, he's actually very good. Well in the Riverside days anyway.

Raymond Blanc - still cuts it. Le Manior is a real treat.

Marcus Wareing - another who reached new heights once shot of Ramsay.

Paul Bocuse - what he produced in the early 80s (and his restaurant in Lyon still does) just says "French" to me. I love it.

Cheong Liew - Adelaide's (possibly Australia's) first true celebrity chef. Innovative post-Nouveau who inspired a whole generation of young cooks.

Pierre the Bear - his hints and help have proved invaluable to many on here.

Hate:

Gordon Ramsay - head up his own arse and his food can't save it for him. Cunt needs a slap.

Angela Hartnett - that's right love, ignore your background and destroy millenia of good food practice. Italian food should have flavour. Not over seasoned bland swill.

Gary Rhodes - "just another knob of butter" ??? No Gary. Fucking NO !! Too complex. The produce gets lost under too many layers. Stupid hair.

Anthony Worral-Thompson - simple food.....ruined. Just about everything I saw at the Lamb Inn was overcooked. Dry chicken is criminal for a professional. Not to mention declaring bankrupcy (putting 80 people out of work and sending a few suppiers to the wall) then, free from debt, he reopened the Greyhound. Prick.

I'm sure I will think of some more before too long :p

 
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avole

Guest
Haven't tried any of their stuff. Have eaten in one of the Blanc chain restos - strictly average - and have tried one of Ramsey's cookbooks. On the evidence of that, the guy knows his classic French cuisine.

 

Diapason

Wammer
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Jan 6, 2012
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Simon
I'm not a chef, but I've never felt more shafted in a restaurant than I did at Bocuse in Lyon.

 

gintonic

Noise, distortion & faff
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Apr 25, 2012
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simon
HiFi Trade?
  1. No
Chefs and their teams whose food I like and who actually make an appearance in their restaurant kitchens........

Claude Bosi at Hibiscus in London

Alexis Gauthier at Gauthier Soho in London

Simon Rogan at Roganic (2 year pop-up in London, ate there on Saturday night for the 3rd time - shame it closes this week) and at L'Eclume in Cartmel (just booked to go again in August)

Roca Brothers at Roca El Celler de Can Roca in Girona and at the much more accessible Moo Restaurant located in the OMM Hotel in Barcelona

Richard Corrigan at Corrigans in London

Antonin Bonnet who was at the Greenhouse in London until last year

 

Diapason

Wammer
Wammer
Jan 6, 2012
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Simon
Out of curiosity, why?
Well as always YMMV, but I felt it was more tourist attraction than restaurant, trading on past glories rather than current greatness. Bottom line, the food just wasn't that great. Now fair enough, you could cheerfully argue that I just don't get the whole thing and am more impressed by current fashions rather than old-school French masters, and you'd be fair to point that out. But when your €80 bowl of truffle soup doesn't even have the slightest aroma of truffles when you break through the pastry, you have to wonder.

Apart from that the service was bollocks, genuinely bollocks, and with zero effort made. Little things like the wine arriving after we'd finished our first course didn't help (and since I was there with a wine lecturer, we weren't exact skimping) but the general sense was that nobody really gave a shit, and it was beyond the stereotypical French snootiness. It's quite a while ago now but my dining companions and I still talk about it. I've read a lot about it before and since, and some people still have very good experiences there, while some people report similar to ourselves, so it's possible we were just unlucky.

In contrast, Leon de Lyon the following night was utterly superb. I'm sorry that restaurant's no more.

 

Leonard Smalls

Wammer
Wammer
Aug 14, 2005
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Shropshire Borders,
Claude Bosi at Hibiscus in London
I went to Hibiscus a couple of times when it was in Ludlow.

And while it was very skilful cooking it was rather too fussy, sauces tended to be a smear on the plate and the whole place was as quiet as a library.

I actually preferred Bosi's "pub grub" place at Yarpole not far away!

Otherwise, I'm a fan of Shaun Hill's cooking; shame the Merchant House has gone from Ludlow. Foodie-wise we've only got La Becasse (Hibiscus wannabe), Mr Underhills (excellent seasonal produce, beautifully cooked, but "you'll get what your given" menu), and a decent Thai restaurant...

 
G

Guest

Guest
Foodie-wise we've only got La Becasse (Hibiscus wannabe), Mr Underhills (excellent seasonal produce, beautifully cooked, but "you'll get what your given" menu), and a decent Thai restaurant...
Best

Breakfast

Ever

Bar none

A woman at the table next to me ordered muesli (instead of the full English). You what? Why are you even here?

 
G

Guest

Guest
Best Italian food I ever had was in an un-named restaurant that was an extension to the owner's house.

Middle of nowhere in Umbria.

Wine was local, minutes old & came in jugs.

I'd read that pasta could be a religious experience & thought what a complete load of b*llocks.

But the two old dears (80 if they were a day) in the kitchen could still manage ravioli that came close to orgasmic.

Best Indonesian was in a scabby roadside caff in Bali.

The kitchen and toilet were hard to tell apart.

But their Nasi Goreng on thin plastic plates was sublime and my premonition of a serious dose of the "Screaming Wah-Shits" proved unfounded.

Biggest disappointment, Bibendum.

Tasteless food, tables too close together and snotty waiters.

I complained, but they didn't give a toss.

 

AdamK

Wammer
Wammer
Sep 29, 2005
2,723
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Bucks/Herts border
I always think the best food is to be found at restaurants on the way up - trying for a michelin star, or have got one and want more. Once they are up there writing books and doing TV series, forget it as they are not concentrating on the food anymore.

Best meal I have eaten this year was at The Sir Charles Napier

http://www.sircharlesnapier.co.uk/

So good that I'm going again this Saturday.

After Masterchef I very much wanted to eat at The Hand & Flowers in Marlow - attempting to secure a table booking has however proved nigh on impossible despite promises of calls being returned etc etc.

 

Vinyl Art

Wammer
Wammer
Feb 13, 2010
12,349
185
0
HiFi Trade?
  1. No
For me, the prices tend to push this out of my league. L'enclume just down the road from me would be a £250 to £300 pound meal and wine for 2. I imagine the others are much the same and the London based ones even more. I might try out the Pig N Whistle pub in Cartmel, now owned by the same, see what that is like.

I do like to hunt out good food at that bracket below 1 star Michellin level, but the chefs don't tend to attract much publicity, other than at a local level. I tend to avoid like the plague all hotel food, which in most places is still dire and overpriced. I say most, as some chefs have had great success with Hotels, again mainly in London, although I note Rogan is also working with the Manchester Hotel.

 

Diapason

Wammer
Wammer
Jan 6, 2012
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Simon
Totally agreed on the "up-and-coming" aspect. The best restaurant in Dublin at the moment (to my mind) doesn't have a star but is definitely gunning for one. Lunch tends to be fantastic value in these places as well.

 
G

Guest

Guest
Totally agreed on the "up-and-coming" aspect. The best restaurant in Dublin at the moment (to my mind) doesn't have a star but is definitely gunning for one. Lunch tends to be fantastic value in these places as well.
We've been going to a 1* Michelin gaff for 15 years for their Lunch For Less.

3 starters, 3 mains, 3 puds about 30 quid plus service.

Then buy a decent bottle of NZ Sauv Blanc.

3.jpg


 

Pierre The Bear

Wammer
Wammer
Sep 19, 2009
2,385
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LEEDS
AKA
John
Been buying these for years by the Michelin tyre garage.£3.49
1324301226243.jpg
I have no problem with McD's, they serve a purpose.

I would even consider buying one of their burgers IF one actually looked like this one but they don't and never have.

 

browellm

Wammer
Wammer
Sep 9, 2008
23,599
482
128
Inspired by another thread, which professional chefs do you rate and hate. Obviously, a certain amount of the "personality" will influence how you feel but a purely culinary opinion is also valid (that is why most of them are chefs after all).Rate:

Mark Sargent - once out of the shadow of Ramsay, stripped his food back to basics. Excellent.

Heston Blumenthal - food as science. I wasn't sure until I tried it. Fantastic (once).

Jamie Oliver - unfashionable of me I know but once he shuts his gob and actually cooks, he's actually very good. Well in the Riverside days anyway.

Raymond Blanc - still cuts it. Le Manior is a real treat.

Marcus Wareing - another who reached new heights once shot of Ramsay.

Paul Bocuse - what he produced in the early 80s (and his restaurant in Lyon still does) just says "French" to me. I love it.

Cheong Liew - Adelaide's (possibly Australia's) first true celebrity chef. Innovative post-Nouveau who inspired a whole generation of young cooks.

Pierre the Bear - his hints and help have proved invaluable to many on here.

Hate:

Gordon Ramsay - head up his own arse and his food can't save it for him. Cunt needs a slap.

Angela Hartnett - that's right love, ignore your background and destroy millenia of good food practice. Italian food should have flavour. Not over seasoned bland swill.

Gary Rhodes - "just another knob of butter" ??? No Gary. Fucking NO !! Too complex. The produce gets lost under too many layers. Stupid hair.

Anthony Worral-Thompson - simple food.....ruined. Just about everything I saw at the Lamb Inn was overcooked. Dry chicken is criminal for a professional. Not to mention declaring bankrupcy (putting 80 people out of work and sending a few suppiers to the wall) then, free from debt, he reopened the Greyhound. Prick.

I'm sure I will think of some more before too long :p
Of that list I've only eaten at Le Manoir. Absolutely lovely. Best hotel I ever stayed in too.

The Fat Duck is an utter cunt to get into, I gave up.

 

Pierre The Bear

Wammer
Wammer
Sep 19, 2009
2,385
58
93
LEEDS
AKA
John
Terry this is a great thread and so much to debate.

Thanks for rating me I'm truly honoured mate.

Thing about Gordon Ramsay is, your right his head is up his arse now and he does need a slap I agree with your comment and have talked about it with many folk but please remember that before he became a TV personality and therefore no longer a chef he was absolutely fucking amazing, he trained under Marco so had a great start but forget all the restaurants he owned\owns and all the TV shit and consider the fact he earned 3 Michelin stars. That takes sheer hard work and talent in buckets full. So once he got famous can you blame the guy for thinking, fuck 18 hour days sweating my arse off when I can make a lot more money on telly?

I no longer rate him as a chef but he WAS one of the best if not the.

What about Michael Caines? Lost an arm in a car accident and went on to earn 2 Michelin stars at Gidleigh park in Devon

http://www.gidleigh.com/restaurant/menus

 

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