floors and hifis

G

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I'm aware of the effects of walls (reflections) and soft furnishings (damping) in a room, but what are your thoughts on which type of floor is most flattering to a hi fi?

Rigid (concrete etc) or Resonant (eg sprung floorboards)?

I've had my hifi inabout a dozendifferent rooms over the last 14 years, and was thinking about where it sounded best (I recently moved house, so I'm trying to get the balance between it sounding good, and not being too in the way).

The two rooms where I have the fondest memories of lights-off, close eyes, picture-the-orchestra were both similar size (from memory, about 4m x 6m), with concrete/stone walls and solid concrete floor. These were bedsit/student rooms, so there was a bed and a sofa, plus carpet and heavy curtains and lots of books. But it has sounded good in rooms with suspended floorboards too.

My previous house had a concrete floor, but a lot of clutter (combined lounge/dining room, not really enough room for everything), and I never managed to get a particularly good soundscape. Current house: suspended floor (cellar below). Much 'friendlier, warmer' sound than I've ever had. Although this is great for background music, it is not really what I have a hi-fi for and there isquite noticeable loss of detail and spacial imagery.

Does the floor make much difference, do you think?

 

Papa Lazarou

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The floor composition makes a whole world of difference ime - so do the room furnishings and flooring material ie carpet or laminate.

In my house i have a wooden suspended floor, thats been laminated over. I'd gladly swop it for a nice concrete floor with carpet on top. Wooden floorboards resonate too much for my liking.

 

rockmeister

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wot they said.

best sound ever was on solid concrete with wood laminate overlay and a large soft rug in the middle...but it is kit dependant too, cos thats a cold and clean sound and isn't going to do anything very analytical many favours IMO. Nice with valves tho:)

 
G

Guest

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concrete everytime. we are having timber floors throughout our new house. fully glued down so i'm hoping it should sound good when i get the new jadis valve amp aswell.

 

Jim

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I suppose really what ever happens your stuck with what ever floor you have unless you excavate or get the local builders to fill it in.

But a solution would be a Behringer DEQ2496. This sorted my room acoustics out for as little as £200( a bit more if you want the mic). Got rid of boomy bass(and actually gave more bass)and a shrill top end. Jim.

 
G

Guest

Guest
Will certainly consider digital room equaliser.

Was happily enjoying some Mahler (actually Uri Caine 'Urlicht -gives Mahler the Jaques Loussier tratment and makes it sound much more Kletzmer, less Central European Classical tradition. I love it, but it is pretty wierd). Mywife said 'yuck, why don't you put on some Massive attack like we had on earlier' Luminous orange CD goes on CD turntable (hadn't listened to this before in the new house).

Instead of the precise dum dum dum dadum dum dum dum bass line, I get a blancmange. I say 'this sounds awful'. Lorraine (whoengineered the album!!!!!) is visting us, thinks I am referring to the music or the enginieering of the CD, but sees clearly how the room is bending the bassnote, taking away any definition, and leavingus with (her words) 'a wash of noise'. Not her intention at all. But probably as good as most hifis manage to produce. Just not whatI am used to.

 

stewartwen

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Hiya Petrohage, I have had this problem as well. My floor is a suspended type.

I recently hed the listening room floor underpinned. Awesome difference, also I had extra joisting placed under the floor too.

I also use a couplke of garden slabs from B+Q which are in turn placed on top of about half a dozen central heating bricks. These come from the insides of old storage radiators.

These may work for you.

Regards

Stewart

 

rockmeister

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good shout stew...exactly what I did when we moved to a suspended floor house. No need to treat the whole floor, but the area under the speakers...rip up boards, concrete in an extra joist and put bricks under all relevant joists...use old slates to make a tight fit, keeping these between the joists and the bricks (also act as a damp course if its earth under the bricks). Works well IMO.
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G

Guest

Guest
First step I think will be to get some concrete slabs for the speakers (give a bit of inertia). And refill the stands with sand. I remember this made a lot of difference when I last had a suspended floor. Then I emptied out the sand one time when I moved house to a concrete floor, discovered then that sand made almost no difference and thought maybe I'd been deluding myself about the effect. Now I think:

suspended floor: sand in stands has big effect,

concrete floor: little effect.

Also, Lorraine (my record engineer lodger) was raving about rubber flooring for sound isolation. I see there are some ads neatly appearing at the bottom of this thread, so that will be something to investigate when budget allows. May also help damp down the noise from next door (end-of terrace house).

 
U

Umberto

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My Arts are on a suspended floor and sound fine. I dont get too much bass or "floppy" bass. Could be down to the speaker / system / room interaction. I don't know for sure but i did have a set of Dynaudio 62 which i couldn't get right no matter where i placed them.

 

Chumpy

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Altthough I am extremely biased having deliberately bought my last 2 audio-room domiciles because of 'solid floors' (on which often I can enjoyably place loudspeakers/t'tables etc/racks...) I have often been astounded how often the sound LIVE or via cheap equipmentin vibrating-in-3D-wood (if not plasterboard/ply studding...)environments is super.

This is all subjective/pot-luck, and if you're really unlucky you continue to overspend.

 

Dannish

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Petrophage wrote:

Fill the stands with sand.
suspended floor: sand in stands has big effect,

concrete floor: little effect.
Depends on the stand i think. Just filled mine and i have concrete floors and there was definate tightening of the Bass. Had to damp some of the stuff in the room as it was vibrating in sympathy after the stands were filled:D

 

stewartwen

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Petrohage, I think you are on to something there re sand filling loudspeaker stands.

All we want for loudspeaker supports is a non resonant stand! This can be aceived in a variety of ways.

1. sand filling

2. lead shot

3.EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE FOAM.

3.flour really works well. Yes the stuff I bake with.

The reason that high mass infills are popular is to get some mass at the bottom of the stand and consequently altering the centre of gravity of the complete l/s stand.

If you are using small l/s on a tall stand the obvious solution is to half fill the stand with your chosen infill. And then fill the remainder with expanded poly foam.

The difference is astounding.

But most important is the transducers position in the room. If you pay attention to room acoustics you will get tight extension in the bass regardless of the flooring type.

But if you place your turntable on a stand (regardless of the type of support unless it is wall mounted) you will get loose sloppy bass with a poorly defined image .

Often room acoustics dominate the sound quality you will get.

Stewart

 

rockmeister

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dear stew

not sure mr townshend would agree about the fllor stands. I guess you mean on a suspended floor? Anyway, thee's as much air born vibration hitting a deck whatever shelf it's on, so a support that damps out that movement is a good thing...most wall stands are rigid, on spikes types I think?
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stewartwen

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Hiya Rockmeister, as far as Max Townshend agreeing with me..........I dont give flying fu*k. This has been MY EXPERIENCE!

After all Max isnt an engineer.

S

ps sorry for being so direct.

 

rockmeister

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I LIKE DIRECT..I WELCOME, NO, I EMBRACE IT WHOLEHEARTEDLY.

SO UP YOURS SONNY, AND IT'S ME WHO'S RIGHT.

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:)

 

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